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Measuring Up: HIV-Related Advocacy Evaluation Training for Civil Society Organisations (learner's guide)

Measuring Up: HIV-Related Advocacy Evaluation Training for Civil Society Organisations (learner's guide)

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Published by icaso_docs
This tool is a stand-alone learner’s guide for anyone interested in evaluating HIV-related advocacy.The overall purpose is to increase users’ capacity to evaluate the progress and results of their advocacy work. The guide is a resource for leaders, advocacy and monitoring and evaluation staff of civil society organisations (including networks) who are involved in designing, implementing and assessing advocacy projects at different levels – international, national and sub-national. See also Faciitation Guide.
This tool is a stand-alone learner’s guide for anyone interested in evaluating HIV-related advocacy.The overall purpose is to increase users’ capacity to evaluate the progress and results of their advocacy work. The guide is a resource for leaders, advocacy and monitoring and evaluation staff of civil society organisations (including networks) who are involved in designing, implementing and assessing advocacy projects at different levels – international, national and sub-national. See also Faciitation Guide.

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International HIV/AIDS Alliance(International secretariat)Preece House91-101 Davigdor RoadHove, BN3 1REUK Telephone: +44(0)1273 718900Fax: +44(0)1273 718901mail@aidsalliance.orgwww.aidsalliance.orgInternational Council o AIDSService Organizations (ICASO)65 Wellesley Street EastSuite 403Toronto, OntarioM4Y 1G7 CanadaTelephone: +1(416)921 0018Fax: +1(416)921 9979icaso@icaso.orgwww.icaso.org
MEASURING UP
 
 A guide for leArners
HIV-related advocacy evaluation trainingor civil society organisations
 AVLG 06/10
Advocacy learners cover.indd 1-222/10/2010 09:40
 
 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This guide or civil society organisations evaluatingHIV-related advocacy was made possible throughthe contribution o many people who accepted beinginterviewed and who participated during the eld test othe guide:Agust Eendy Bin Abd Rachim – Malaysian AIDS Council(MAC); Alan Msosa – AIDS and Rights Alliance orSouthern Arica (ARASA); D. Dhanikachalam – AllianceIndia in Andhra Pradesh;. Dozie Ezechukwu – Networko People Living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (NEPWHAN);Innocent Laison – Arican Council o AIDS ServiceOrganizations (AriCASO); Irene Naserian – Kenya AIDSNGOs Consortium (KANCO); Jasmin Jalil – MalaysianAIDS Council; Juan Jacobo Hernandez – Colectivo Sol,Mexico; Ken Morrison – Futures Group International;Meera Mishra (Consultant); Padma Buggineni – AllianceIndia secretariat; Pavlo Skala – Alliance Ukraine; P. S.Renuka – Alliance India in Andhra Pradesh; RosemaryMburu – Kenya AIDS NGOs Consortium (KANCO);Shaleen Rakesh – Alliance India secretariat; SunitaGrote – Alliance India secretariat; Valerie Pierre Pierre– International Council o AIDS Service Organizations(ICASO).The International Council o AIDS Service Organizations(ICASO) and the International HIV/AIDS Alliance (Alliance)would like to thank the Joint United Nations Programmeon HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the Canadian InternationalDevelopment Agency (CIDA) o the Government oCanada, Positive Action, the Ford Foundation and the Billand Melinda Gates Foundation or their nancial support.The contents are the responsibility o ICASO and theAlliance and do not necessarily refect the views o any othe aorementioned institutions.Written by Nicky Davies (Davies & Lee: AIDS andDevelopment Consulting, www.aidsdev.com) andAlan Brotherton (Alliance secretariat).Design by Jane Shepherd.Coordination by Kieran Daly and Mary Ann Torres (ICASO)and Barbara Pozzoni, Claude Cheta and Anton Kerr(Alliance).Copyright 2010 © International HIV/AIDS Alliance and theInternational Council o AIDS Service Organizations.Inormation and illustrations contained in this publicationmay be reely reproduced, published or otherwise usedor non-prot purposes without permission rom theAlliance or ICASO. However, the Alliance and ICASOrequest they be cited as the source o the inormation.ISBN: 1-905055-66-8Published: July 2010
International HIV/AIDS Alliance
Established in 1993, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance (theAlliance) is a global alliance o nationally-based organisationsworking to support community action on AIDS in developingcountries. To date we have provided support to organisationsrom more than 40 developing countries or over 3,000projects, reaching some o the poorest and most vulnerablecommunities with HIV prevention, care and support, andimproved access to HIV treatment. The Alliance’s national members help local communitygroups and other NGOs to take action on HIV, and aresupported by technical expertise, policy work, knowledgesharing and undraising carried out across the Alliance. Inaddition, the Alliance has extensive regional programmes,representative oces in the USA and Brussels, and works ona range o international activities such as support or South-South cooperation, operations research, training and goodpractice programme development, as well as policy analysisand advocacy.For more inormation about Alliance publications, please goto:
www.aidsalliance.org/publications
Registered charity number 1038860.
The International Council of AIDS ServiceOrganizations (ICASO)
Founded in 1991, the International Council o AIDS ServiceOrganizations’ (ICASO) mission is to mobilise and supportdiverse community organisations to build an eective globalresponse to HIV and AIDS. This is done within a vision oa world where people living with and aected by HIV andAIDS can enjoy lie ree rom stigma, discrimination, andpersecution, and have access to prevention, treatmentand care.The ICASO network o networks operates globally, regionallyand locally, and reaches over 100 countries around the world.The International Secretariat o ICASO is in Canada and itsRegional Secretariats are based in Arica, Asia and the Pacic,Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and North America.For more inormation about ICASO and its RegionalSecretariats, please go to:
www.icaso.org
Advocacy learners cover.indd 3-422/10/2010 09:40
 
1
 
MEASURING UP \\  A GUIDE FOR LEARNERS
The need or advocacy to address the challenges oHIV is widely acknowledged and accepted. There isample evidence o the changes good advocacy hasbeen able to bring about, rom improving healthsystems and treatment supply chains to enablingthe voices o the most marginalised to be heardand or communities to be empowered to meet thechallenges o HIV themselves.However, in many places there are stilloverwhelming silences that prevent eectiveresponses, and we remain ar rom the goal ouniversal access to prevention, care, supportand treatment to which the world’s leaders rstcommitted in 2002. Many donors and governmentsrecognise the need or advocacy to help create thechanges to systems, programmes and culturesthat are needed to stop new inections and enablethose who live with HIV to lead ull and productivelives. Increasingly, the private sector, governmentsand other unders are willing to und advocacyprogrammes and positions, and many civil societyorganisations are nding it possible to acquireresources to conduct more systematic advocacywork.Yet it is oten hard to demonstrate the impactand eectiveness o advocacy work, especiallyin the eld o HIV, or a number o reasons. Thelength o time needed to achieve policy and socialchange is one, as this usually ar exceeds thelength o time or which any project will be unded.Another is that evaluating advocacy requiresnew or modied techniques rom those we useto evaluate interventions or service delivery. Thislearning guide arises rom a workshop conductedby the Alliance, ICASO and Constella Futures in2008, in which we looked at some promising newapproaches being developed to try to address someo these challenges. Participants at that workshopwere keen to spend more time looking at these newtechniques to see i they could help them meet thespecic challenges o HIV-related advocacy.This resource brings together useul concepts andmodels we have identied rom new literatureon advocacy evaluation, much o it developed inand or social change work in the global North.We have taken these ideas and piloted them withcolleagues working in low- and middle-incomecountries, to act as a springboard or civil societyorganisations to develop approaches that meettheir needs or accountability, planning anddelivering results. Because this is relatively newthinking, this resource is not a step-by-step ‘howto’ guide. Instead we want to encourage people totry these approaches and adapt them to their needsand circumstances. So the guide comes with a seto resources that is intended to help advocatesthemselves acquire enough o a working knowledgeo the eld to train themselves and each other.The good news is that with a little planning,advocacy evaluation is able to be fexible, cost-eective and to deliver meaningul inormationto advocates and unders on how our work isprogressing, even i our ultimate goals still seem along way o. This guide outlines key messages oradvocates planning to evaluate their work.We hope you nd this guide useul and welcomeany eedback you have, and especially anyexamples or case studies o advocacy evaluationyou may be willing to share. Feedback and ideascan be sent to the email addresses below:
advocacyevaluation@aidsalliance.orgadvocacyevaluation@icaso.org
Key messages or advocacy evaluation
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It is important to negotiate with donors to designan advocacy evaluation that is realistic andworthwhile, and that is adequately resourced.Engagement o donors in evaluation design isthe most eective way to negotiate an eectivedesign.
l
Advocacy evaluations need to be fexible andable to adapt to changing circumstances, asdoes advocacy work itsel.
l
Since HIV-related advocacy work oten haslong-term goals, it is appropriate and practicalto consider interim advocacy outcomes assignicant evaluation results, alongside policychange outcomes and impact.
l
Since more than one advocate oten contributesto any one advocacy goal, it is reasonable toocus on contribution rather than attribution oadvocacy results where necessary.
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Taking the time to develop and articulate atheory o change or your advocacy work willmake planning and conducting an evaluationeasier.
l
Since networks o key populations or non-governmental organisations are oten a ‘meansto an end and an end in themselves’ oradvocacy work, some evaluation questions canocus on the existence o such a network, orimproved eectiveness o the network in termso the quality o its key internal unctions andprocesses.
INtRODUctION AND ExEcUtIvE SUMMARy

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