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Network Storage

Network Storage

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Published by: ak.microsoft20056613 on Nov 26, 2008
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05/10/2013

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iSCSI: The Futureof Network Storage
 
 iSCSI: The Future of Network Storage
2
Contents
Storage Basics3Direct Attached Storage (DAS)3 Network Attached Storage (NAS)3Storage Area Networks (SANs)3Current Limitations4The Need for IP Storage4What Is Gigabit iSCSI?4iSCSI Defined4Benefits5Who Can Use It5Deployment Examples6 Network Storage Services via iSCSI6Multiple Cards to Single iSCSI Router6iSCSI HBA and Fibre Channel Tape Backup7Conclusion7For More Information7
 
 iSCSI: The Future of Network Storage
Storage Basics
The Internet and related activitiescontinue to expand, increasing theamount of data that needs to be stored.Businesses and other organizationsrequire effective ways to store and maintain this data. Today’s technologymarket offers three basic options:Direct Attached Storage (DAS), Network Attached Storage (NAS) and Storage Area Networks (SANs).
Direct AttachedStorage (DAS)
In its simplest form, DAS consists of adisk drive attached directly to a server.Data is transferred using SCSI (SmallComputer System Interface)commands, the most common meansof I/O communication between acomputer and a hard drive. SCSIcommands transfer data as blocks – low-level, granular units used bystorage devices – as opposed to files,the most common means of transferring data over Local Area Networks (LANs).There are a number of disadvantages tothe DAS approach including high costof management, distance limitationsand limited scalability. In particular, inorder to increase storage capacity,enterprises must purchase moreservers. Furthermore, storage devicesmust be located close to the server since SCSI devices are designed towork over parallel cable with amaximum length of 12 meters. Theselimitations have driven the need for network storage.
Network AttachedStorage (NAS)
 NAS is a file-based storage architecturewith resources attached directly to theLAN. Storage traffic is transmitted over the LAN as well.Since it uses a familiar technology, NAS resources can be managed byexisting IT staff with minimal trainingin storage management, which mayreduce IT costs. Another benefit of  NAS is flexibility – since the storageunit(s) can easily be attached to thenetwork. However, this is not a highlyscalable option, since storage trafficcan become very heavy and decreasethe performance of the LAN.
Storage AreaNetworks (SANs)
SANs are dedicated networks thatconnect servers to storage devices and transport storage traffic without burdening the enterprise LAN (Figure1). Several factors help make SANsattractive, including performance,reliability, availability, scalability and ease of management.Without the potential for centralized data management provided by SANs,
Clients
Direct Attached StorageNetwork Attached StorageStorage Area Networ
ClientsEthernetSwitchSecondaryStorageSecondaryStorageEthernetSwitchEthernetSwitchFCSwitchEthernetSwitchServersServersServersStorage
s
High cost of management
s
Inflexible
s
Expensive to scale
s
Transmission optimized forfile transactions
s
Storage traffic travels acrossthe LAN
s
Transmission optimized forfile transactions
s
Separate LAN and SAN
s
Increases data availability
s
Flexible and scalable
RAID RAIDStorageNAS StorageClients
Time
LANLANLANSANGbEGbEGbEFC
Figure 1
3
Evolution of Network Storage

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