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Freedom Barometer Asia 2011

Freedom Barometer Asia 2011

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It is a great pleasure to welcome you to the new edition of the Freedom Barometer Asia!
The Freedom Barometer aims at measuring and comparing freedom in various Southeast and East
Asian countries, but from a distinctly liberal point of view. For us at the Friedrich Naumann
Foundation, freedom comprises political, legal, and economic rights.


We found that most other indices, while providing valuable information, only focus on one aspect of freedom. For example, the Press Freedom Index by Reporters Without Borders focusses solely on the freedom of the press and
expression, whereas the Fraser Institute‘s Economic Freedom of the World Report examines the
economic aspects of freedom.

Thus, the Freedom Barometer project came into being. However, our Barometer is not an entirely
independent publication, but rather a „compilation“ of the data provided by existing indices. We
present them in a way that reflects our definition of freedom. In our research we relied on and used
the data of the institutions mentioned in Annex II. In this regard, we want to emphasise that without
those data sources the Freedom Barometer could not exist in its present form.
The Barometer now enters the third year of its existence and it has been exciting to see the project
grow further. We included yet another country - Hong Kong - as we felt that its special status within
the People‘s Republic of China merits an own chapter in our index. Also, we revised the look of our
Barometer in order to make it a more reader-friendly publication, while trying to retain its distinct
appearance.

Furthermore, we are specially pleased to announce the launch of the Freedom Barometer website. We
felt that bringing the Barometer online would not only make it easier to compare the various countries
and their performance over the years, but would also provide our readers with up-to-date relevant
news. We are looking forward to your visit at www.freedombarometer.org.
It is a great pleasure to welcome you to the new edition of the Freedom Barometer Asia!
The Freedom Barometer aims at measuring and comparing freedom in various Southeast and East
Asian countries, but from a distinctly liberal point of view. For us at the Friedrich Naumann
Foundation, freedom comprises political, legal, and economic rights.


We found that most other indices, while providing valuable information, only focus on one aspect of freedom. For example, the Press Freedom Index by Reporters Without Borders focusses solely on the freedom of the press and
expression, whereas the Fraser Institute‘s Economic Freedom of the World Report examines the
economic aspects of freedom.

Thus, the Freedom Barometer project came into being. However, our Barometer is not an entirely
independent publication, but rather a „compilation“ of the data provided by existing indices. We
present them in a way that reflects our definition of freedom. In our research we relied on and used
the data of the institutions mentioned in Annex II. In this regard, we want to emphasise that without
those data sources the Freedom Barometer could not exist in its present form.
The Barometer now enters the third year of its existence and it has been exciting to see the project
grow further. We included yet another country - Hong Kong - as we felt that its special status within
the People‘s Republic of China merits an own chapter in our index. Also, we revised the look of our
Barometer in order to make it a more reader-friendly publication, while trying to retain its distinct
appearance.

Furthermore, we are specially pleased to announce the launch of the Freedom Barometer website. We
felt that bringing the Barometer online would not only make it easier to compare the various countries
and their performance over the years, but would also provide our readers with up-to-date relevant
news. We are looking forward to your visit at www.freedombarometer.org.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Fnf Southeast East Asia on Mar 09, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/03/2012

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FreedomBarometerAsia 2011
by Miklós Romàndy & Corinna Johannsen
 
FreedomBarometerAsia 2011
by Miklós Romàndy & Corinna Johannsen
 
Foreword
by Dr. Rainer Adam, Regional Director Southeast and East Asia, Friedrich Naumann Foundation forFreedom, Bangkok
The Freedom Barometer Asia came into being out of a desire to measure the different degrees of freedom enjoyed in Southeast and East Asian countries. Various think tanks and NGOs havedeveloped ways to assess levels of freedom in a number of countries, and they have done so invarious ways., In most cases, however, they have focussed only on one aspect of freedom, be itpolitical, legal or economic.Developing an index that considers all of these aspects of freedom
 
from a distinctly liberal pointof view was one of the main reasons for us at the Friedrich-Naumann-Foundation to start ourFreedom Barometer project. Since this promised to be a daunting task, we decided not to issue anentirely independent publication, but rather “compile” the data of existing indices in a new way,emphasising those aspects of freedom we treasure most. In doing so, we aimed not only to provideour readers with a tool with which to compare levels of freedom in selected Southeast and EastAsian countries and to track their performance over time. We are e also hoping to bring relevantissues to the attention of a wider audience and to stimulate a debate about the political, legal, andeconomic foundations of freedom.As I mentioned, this publication is a compilation of data from existing indices, without which thisproject would not exist in its current form. I would like to acknowledge these publications thatprovide the data we compile and present according to our liberal understanding of freedom.It is an immense pleasure to see the Freedom Barometer Asia being published for the thirdconsecutive year. And what an exciting year it was!We saw political changes in Myanmar that would have been unthinkable just a few years ago:recently introduced liberties such as the right to form unions, to go on strike, and to stage peacefulpolitical protests have brought a gentle air of freedom to this beautiful country. We dearly hopethat these developments are but a herald of more changes.News from Northern Asia was equally encouraging. After a de-facto moratorium on the deathpenalty had been introduced by President Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj in 2010, Mongolia took furthersteps to eliminate capital punishment from its legal system last year. Since we strongly oppose thedeath penalty in all its forms as a severe violation of human rights, we warmly embrace thisdecision.Elsewhere, developments were less encouraging. In North Korea, Kim Jong-Un succeeded hisfather and seems to be consolidating the hereditary dictatorship of the Kim family which, fordecades, has deprived North Koreans from any form of freedom. Deficits persist in all aspects.Our Freedom Barometer Asia is constantly growing, both in size and volume. With newlyincluded Hongkong, it now covers 17 countries, almost all of Southeast and East Asia. Bypublishing our index for the third time we are able to gain good insights into progress and

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