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Joyce Proposal Draft 11-24-08

Joyce Proposal Draft 11-24-08

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Published by: Sweet Water on Mar 09, 2012
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03/09/2012

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11.24.08 1:40pm
Overview
 
This
 
proposal
 
presents
 
the
 
collaborative
 
efforts
 
of
 
and
 
seeks
 
 Joyce
 
Foundation
 
support
 
for
 
seven
 
Wisconsin
 
nonprofit
 
conservation
 
organizations
 
participating
 
in
 
the
 
Southeastern
 
Wisconsin
 
Watersheds
 
Trust
 
(SWWT,
 
or
 
the
 
Trust)
 
from
 
the
 
present
 
time
 
through
 
 June
 
of
 
2012.
 
The
 
SWWT
 
was
 
formed
 
in
 
2008.
 
It
 
emerged
 
from
 
years
 
of
 
discussion
 
and
 
deliberation
 
about
 
how
 
the
 
surface
 
waters
 
of
 
that
 
region
 
of
 
Wisconsin
 
drained
 
 by
 
the
 
Menomonee,
 
Kinnickinnic
 
(KK),
 
Milwaukee
 
and
 
Root
 
Rivers,
 
Oak
 
Creek,
 
the
 
Milwaukee
 
Harbor
 
Estuary
 
and
 
near
 
Milwaukee
 
Lakeshore
 
could
 
 be
 
cleaned
 
up
 
in
 
a
 
cost
 
effective
 
manner.
 
(For
 
SWWT’s
 
goals
 
and
 
purposes,
 
see
 
attached
 
 brochure.)
 
SWWT’s
 
structure
 
has
 
 been
 
carefully
 
considered,
 
and
 
is
 
in
 
place:
 
an
 
executive
 
steering
 
council
 
oversees
 
the
 
Trust’s
 
activities;
 
a
 
committee
 
for
 
scientific
 
review
 
has
 
 been
 
established;
 
and
 
watershed
 
action
 
teams
 
in
 
each
 
watershed
 
will
 
help
 
develop
 
watershed
 
restoration
 
plans.
 
A
 
key
 
underlying
 
purpose
 
of
 
the
 
SWWT
 
is
 
collaboration
 
 
collaboration
 
across
 
municipal
 
 boundaries,
 
across
 
government
 
agencies,
 
and
 
across
 
sectors
 
(private,
 
governmental,
 
nonprofit).
 
The
 
individuals
 
and
 
organizations
 
involved
 
in
 
the
 
SWWT
 
feel
 
strongly
 
that
 
such
 
collaboration
 
will
 
generate
 
innovation,
 
develop
 
new
 
and
 
useful
 
relationships,
 
 break
 
down
 
old
 
 barriers
 
and
 
obstacles
 
to
 
change,
 
and
 
forge
 
policy
 
and
 
other
 
reforms
 
ultimately
 
leading
 
to
 
significant
 
improvements
 
in
 
water
 
quality
 
and
 
moving
 
us
 
forward
 
toward
 
the
 
primary
 
goals
 
of
 
the
 
Clean
 
Water
 
Act—fishable,
 
swimmable
 
waters.
 
There
 
are
 
two
 
important
 
 building
 
 blocks
 
on
 
which
 
the
 
SWWT,
 
and
 
the
 
participation
 
of
 
these
 
nonprofit
 
groups,
 
is
 
 built.
 
One
 
is
 
the
 
updated
 
Regional
 
Water
 
Quality
 
Management
 
Plan
 
(RWQMP),
 
which
 
outlines
 
how
 
the
 
next
 
or
 
second
 
set
 
of
 
 building
 
 blocks
 
 
watershed
 
restoration
 
plans
‐‐
will
 
 be
 
developed
 
and
 
implemented,
 
starting
 
with
 
the
 
Menomonee
 
and
 
Kinnickinnic
 
River
 
watersheds.
 
It’s
 
expected
 
that
 
work
 
will
 
 begin
 
on
 
at
 
least
 
one
 
more
 
watershed
 
within
 
the
 
timeframe
 
of
 
this
 
three
year
 
project
 
These
 
watersheds,
 
and
 
the
 
watershed
 
restoration
 
planning
 
process,
 
were
 
chosen
 
 because
 
of
 
the
 
extensive
 
amount
 
of
 
groundwork
 
already
 
done
 
in
 
this
 
area
 
 by
 
the
 
Southeastern
 
Wisconsin
 
Regional
 
Planning
 
Commission
 
(SEWRPC),
 
the
 
Milwaukee
 
Metropolitan
 
Sewerage
 
District
 
(MMSD),
 
and
 
the
 
municipalities
 
in
 
the
 
watersheds.
 
These
 
plans
 
and
 
their
 
implementation
 
will
 
 be
 
 built
 
upon
 
existing
 
regulations,
 
evolving
 
regulations,
 
and
 
other
 
factors
 
often
 
overlooked
 
in
 
such
 
planning
 
exercises,
 
such
 
as
 
habitat
 
and
 
the
 
 biological
 
integrity
 
of
 
the
 
ecosystem.
 
They
 
will
 
 be
 
shaped
 
 by
 
citizen
 
participation.
 
In
 
planning
 
for
 
 biological
 
integrity,
 
SWWT’s
 
efforts
 
will
 
not
 
only
 
enhance
 
regulatory
 
effort,
 
 but
 
go
 
 beyond
 
what
 
is
 
required
 
in
 
improving
 
water
 
resources.
 
Going
 
 beyond
 
 
 2
existing
 
regulations
 
will
 
ensure
 
a
 
sustainable
 
Lake
 
Michigan
 
that
 
can
 
support
 
the
 
greater
 
Milwaukee
 
watersheds
 
economically,
 
recreationally,
 
and
 
environmentally.
 
The
 
seven
 
nonprofit
 
organizations
 
whose
 
contributions
 
and
 
participation
 
in
 
the
 
SWWT
 
is
 
described
 
in
 
the
 
following
 
pages
 
have
 
 been
 
engaged
 
in
 
developing
 
the
 
SWWT.
 
As
 
part
 
of
 
the
 
work
 
supported
 
 by
 
last
 
year’s
 
 Joyce
 
Foundation
 
grant,
 
these
 
groups
 
are
 
now
 
fully
 
engaged
 
in
 
SWWT
 
activities.
 
Each
 
group
 
 brings
 
its
 
unique
 
energy,
 
competency
 
and
 
expertise
 
to
 
the
 
collaborative.
 
Collectively,
 
the
 
groups
 
add
 
a
 
useful
 
dimension
 
to
 
the
 
SWWT.
 
They
 
are
 
not
 
constrained
 
 by
 
the
 
same
 
political
 
considerations
 
that
 
can
 
often
 
slow
 
down
 
or
 
stymie
 
government.
 
Their
 
relatively
 
small
 
size
 
and
 
flat
 
organizational
 
structures
 
allow
 
for
 
quick
 
and
 
decisive
 
movement.
 
Taking
 
risks
 
and
 
experimenting
 
with
 
new
 
approaches
 
 
in
 
other
 
words,
 
challenging
 
conventions
 
and
 
changing
 
society
 
 
is
 
why
 
they
 
are
 
in
 
 business.
 
While
 
the
 
kind
 
of
 
work
 
proposed
 
herein
 
would
 
 be
 
difficult,
 
perhaps
 
even
 
foolish,
 
to
 
attempt
 
without
 
 broad
 
collaboration
 
in
 
a
 
structure
 
like
 
the
 
SWWT,
 
the
 
SWWT
 
itself
 
would
 
 be
 
a
 
less
 
vital
 
organization
 
without
 
these
 
nonprofits,
 
and
 
less
 
likely
 
to
 
succeed
 
at
 
its
 
ultimate
 
goal
 
of
 
improving
 
the
 
surface
 
waters
 
of
 
southeastern
 
Wisconsin,
 
including
 
the
 
great
 
Great
 
Lake
 
to
 
which
 
it
 
all
 
flows.
 
The
 
Structure
 
of
 
this
 
Proposal
 
This
 
proposal
 
is
 
 built
 
around
 
five
 
themes
 
or
 
directions
 
which
 
emerged
 
from
 
the
 
SWWT’s
 
three
year
 
operational
 
plan
 
(see
 
attached).
 
They
 
are:
 
I.
 
Monitoring,
 
Modeling
 
and
 
the
 
Science
 
of
 
Water
 
II.
 
Developing
 
and
 
Implementing
 
the
 
Watershed
 
Restoration
 
Plans
 
III.
 
The
 
Legal
 
and
 
Policy
 
Implementation
 
of
 
the
 
Watershed
 
Restoration
 
Plans
 
IV.
 
Developing
 
a
 
Communications
 
and
 
Outreach
 
Strategy
 
for
 
SWWT
 
V.
 
SWWT
 
Administration
 
and
 
Committee
 
Support
 
Each
 
section
 
will
 
have
 
a
 
preface
 
explaining
 
the
 
underlying
 
purpose
 
of
 
the
 
work
 
described
 
in
 
it,
 
specific
 
tasks
 
to
 
 be
 
done,
 
milestones,
 
and
 
expected
 
outcomes
 
 by
 
the
 
end
 
of
 
the
 
three
year
 
grant
 
period
 
(approximately
 
 July
 
of
 
2012).
 
I.
 
Monitoring,
 
Modeling
 
and
 
the
 
Science
 
of
 
Water
 
Good
 
science
 
must
 
underpin
 
any
 
recommended
 
changes
 
in
 
practices
 
on
 
the
 
land
 
or
 
reforms
 
in
 
policy
 
that
 
will
 
get
 
us
 
to
 
cleaner
 
water.
 
And
 
the
 
 best
 
pathway
 
to
 
sound
 
 
 3
science
 
in
 
the
 
realm
 
of
 
water
 
quality
 
 
indeed,
 
the
 
only
 
way
 
to
 
really
 
know
 
the
 
quality
 
of
 
a
 
water
 
 body
 
and
 
whether
 
or
 
not
 
changes
 
on
 
the
 
landscape
 
and
 
in
 
infrastructure
 
actually
 
improve
 
water
 
quality
‐‐
is
 
through
 
mundane
 
 but
 
methodical
 
monitoring
 
 
taking,
 
testing
 
and
 
analyzing
 
samples
 
of
 
water
 
for
 
various
 
pollutants
 
and
 
 biological
 
life.
 
Furthermore,
 
even
 
if
 
you
 
have
 
the
 
data,
 
it’s
 
worth
 
questioning
 
the
 
assumptions
 
of
 
the
 
model
 
used
 
to
 
analyze
 
water
 
quality
 
data
 
to
 
 be
 
sure
 
the
 
results
 
of
 
that
 
modeling
 
provide
 
optimal
 
information
 
to
 
make
 
management
 
decisions
 
about
 
these
 
water
 
 bodies.
 
To
 
that
 
end,
 
River
 
Alliance
 
of
 
Wisconsin
 ,
 
Milwaukee
 
Riverkeeper
 
and
 
Clean
 
Wisconsin
 
have
 
lead
 
roles
 
in
 
this
 
element
 
of
 
the
 
project.
 
River
 
Alliance
 
will
 
endeavor
 
to
 
create
 
an
 
over
arching,
 
region
wide
 
water
 
quality
 
monitoring
 
system
 
and
 
plan;
 
Milwaukee
 
Riverkeeper
 
will
 
expands
 
its
 
network
 
of
 
citizen
 
volunteer
 
water
 
monitors
 
and
 
will
 
continue
 
sampling
 
stormwater
 
outfalls
 
for
 
 bacteria
 
in
 
 both
 
the
 
KK
 
and
 
Menomonee.
 
Clean
 
Wisconsin
 
will
 
take
 
the
 
lead
 
in
 
refining
 
and
 
adapting
 
the
 
modeling
 
and
 
analysis
 
of
 
water
 
quality
 
data.
 
All
 
three
 
groups
 
will
 
participate
 
in
 
the
 
SWWT’s
 
Science
 
Committee.
 
A.
 
Creating
 
a
 
Unified
 
Water
 
Quality
 
Monitoring
 
Plan
 
and
 
System.
 
Monitoring
 
is
 
commonly
 
used
 
to
 
measure
 
improvements
 
to
 
water
 
quality,
 
assess
 
ecological
 
function,
 
and
 
gauge
 
the
 
effectiveness
 
of
 
management
 
and
 
restoration
 
practices.
 
However,
 
monitoring
 
is
 
not
 
 being
 
done
 
to
 
the
 
fullest
 
extent
 
necessary
 
in
 
the
 
Greater
 
Milwaukee
 
watersheds;
 
therefore
 
it
 
is
 
difficult
 
to
 
make
 
informed
 
management
 
decisions
 
and
 
educate
 
the
 
public
 
about
 
the
 
quality
 
of
 
the
 
area’s
 
streams.
 
Though
 
several
 
institutions
 
are
 
monitoring
 
waterways
 
in
 
southeastern
 
Wisconsin,
 
most
 
efforts
 
are
 
not
 
coordinated
 
or
 
systematic;
 
they
 
are
 
not
 
carried
 
out
 
on
 
a
 
watershed
 
scale;
 
they
 
do
 
not
 
identify
 
multi
institutional
 
efficiencies;
 
and
 
none
 
operate
 
under
 
a
 
unifying
 
goal
 
aimed
 
at
 
restoring
 
watersheds.
 
The
 
SWWT
 
has
 
chosen
 
to
 
use
 
a
 
watercourse
 
water
 
quality
 
model
 
to
 
analyze
 
the
 
most
 
effective
 
restoration
 
practices.
 
Collecting
 
monitoring
 
data
 
is
 
vital
 
to
 
calibrating
 
and
 
verifying
 
this
 
model.
 
Also,
 
coordinated,
 
systematic
 
monitoring
 
would
 
allow
 
the
 
SWWT
 
to
 
measure
 
water
 
quality
 
improvements
 
across
 
whole
 
watersheds.
 
The
 
fact
 
that
 
additional
 
monitoring
 
is
 
needed
 
to
 
complete
 
the
 
watershed
 
restoration
 
plans
 
is
 
one
 
example
 
of
 
the
 
potential
 
 benefits
 
of
 
a
 
coordinated
 
monitoring
 
effort.
 
River
 
Alliance
 
proposes
 
to
 
create
 
and
 
implement
 
a
 
unified
 
monitoring
 
plan
 
and
 
system
 
for
 
the
 
Greater
 
Milwaukee
 
watersheds.
 
The
 
River
 
Alliance
 
will
 
lead
 
this
 
process
 
and
 
work
 
within
 
the
 
structure
 
of
 
the
 
SWWT,
 
including
 
participation
 
in
 
the
 
SWWT
 
Executive
 
Steering
 
Council
 
and
 
the
 
Science
 
Committee,
 
to
 
develop
 
this
 
plan.
 
This
 
effort
 
grows
 
out,
 
to
 
some
 
extent,
 
of
 
citizen
 
water
 
monitoring
 
consulting
 
undertaken
 
 by
 
the
 
River
 
Alliance
 
in
 
the
 
first
 
year
 
of
 
the
 
 Joyce
 
Foundation
 
grant.
 

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