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Times Leader 03-11-2012

Times Leader 03-11-2012

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Published by The Times Leader
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 03-11
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 03-11

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Published by: The Times Leader on Mar 11, 2012
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Open a phone book for Luzerne andLackawanna counties and the pages of surnames beginning with “Mc” aremore than double those with theseemingly more common “Smith”listings.So when and why did so many Irish citizens cometo America and set-tle in NortheasternPennsylvania? And howdid they become entrenched inpolitics?Some came in the 1700s forfarmland, according toMary Ruth Burke, curator for theLuzerneCountyHistoricalSociety and a student of her own Irish cul-ture. But the majority came in themid to late 1800s because of theIrishPotatoFamine,alsoknownas
T
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eader
C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012 $1.50
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09815 10077
timesleader.com
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VOUCHERFOR ONLY
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Meyers boys, GNA girls win in PIAA playoffs
SPORTS,1C
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Until2008,Pennsylvaniaanddozensofotherstatesusedanassettesttodeterminefoodstampeligibility.Buttherecentrecessionpromptedmanyincluding theKeystoneState–toscrapthetesttohelprelievein-creasedhardshipsonlow-incomefamilies.Now,asthefederalandstategovernmentsfacetheirown budgetary hardships, some are reinstituting thetest. This change hasraised the ire of some legislators,residentsandcom-munity groups whoarguethattherecession has notended for many and the test woulddomoreharmthangood.In Pennsylvania,regulations ap-proved by the De-partment of Public Welfare and sup-ported by Gov. Tom Corbett areset to take effectMay1. The plan spellsout financial requirements for food stamp eligibility under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Pro-gram, commonly referred to as SNAP. The plan re-quiresbenefitsonlyforhouseholdsthathavenomore
FO O D STA M P S
Asset testfaces newopposition
In Pennsylvania, regulations approved by theDPW and supported by Gov. Tom Corbett areset to take effect May 1.
ByANDREWM.SEDER 
 aseder@timesleader.com
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
SNAPsignonthedoorofSchiel’sMarketinWilkes-Barre
INSIDE:
Two lawmakers co-sponsor bill to halt test,
Page6A.SeeTEST,Page6A
INSIDE
ANEWS
Local 3AObituaries 2A,10Click 12A
BPEOPLE
Birthdays 8B
CSPORTS
Outdoors 12C
DBUSINESS
Motley Fool 4D
EVIEWS
Editorial 2E
FETC.
Puzzles 2FBooks 5F
GCLASSIFIED
Hockey
Pens take win
Story,1C
 W 
ith parades, parties and green-tintedhoopla surrounding St. Patrick’sDay,thelevelofIrishprideinNorth-easternPennsylvaniacouldn’tbemoreobvious.Local store shelves are filled with Irish-themeditems. Taverns are running drink and corned-beef specials.Kelly green is very fashionablethisweek.Andthere’squantitativedatato prove the region’s pride isbased on fact and not just blar-ney:2010U.S.Censusdatashow 20 percent of the county’s popula-tionclaimsIrishan-cestry, nearly dou-blethenationalaverage.Mary Holmgren and her mother, JaneClarke, whose family owns Clarke’s Irish Im-ports&FlowerShopinAshley,catertothose with
CELEBRATINGIRISH HERITAGE
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Above,NancyBellasofKingstontriesonclothesintheIrishmotifaswellasshopsforbabyclothesforhergranddaughterEulinaBellasatClarke’sIrishImports&FlowerShopinAshleyonSaturday.Below,thisleprechaunatClarke’smovesandtalkswhenpluggedin.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
How green the Valley 
Census says area 20 percent Irish 
 Why so many Irish people settled here
LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTOS
TheoriginalMercyHospitalinWilkes-Barreopenedin1898undertheReligiousSistersofMercy.
MOREINSIDE
HISTORY:
Molly Maguireslegend lives on,
Page 7A
TOWNS:
Some localmunicipalitiesone-third Irish,
Page14A
TheRev.JohnJ.Curran,firstpastorofHolySaviourChurchinWilkes-Barre.Con-stableWilliamO’Rileytradi-tionallyledtheEastEndSt.Pa-trick’sParade.
“They just buyanything thathas shamrocksand is green,really.”
MaryHolmgren
Clarke’s Irish Imports
SeeHERITAGE,Page14ASeeSETTLE,Page7A
BySTEVEMOCARSK
 smocarsky@timesleader.com
BySTEVEMOCARSK
 smocarsky@timesleader.com
The majoritycame in themid to late1800s.
 WICHITA, Kan. — Rick Santorum scored a re-soundingvictorySaturdayintheKansascaucuses, winningmorethanhalfofthevotes,claimingmostofthedelegatesandbolsteringhiscredibilityasheturnstootherstateswithsimilarGOPelectorates.Facing crucial tests in Alabama and Mississippion Tuesday and Missouri onSaturday,Santorumhopestodiminish Newt Gingrich sohecancompetehead-to-head with Mitt Romney for theparty’s presidential nomina-tion.ButevenasSantorumadd-ed more delegates to his to-tal, Romney collected almost as many from small-ercaucusesSaturday,leavingSantorumstillmorethan 200 behind."We’ve had a very good day in our neighboring stateofKansas,"Santorumtoldsupportersataral-
Santorum scores a victory in Kansas
Romney collected almost as many delegatesfrom smaller caucuses Saturday, leavingformer Pa. senator more than 200 behind.
ByJOHNHOEFFE
 Los Angeles Times
SeeSANTORUM,Page2A
2012
ELECTION
‘ConCar-bon(1874-1907),famousforrecitationsaboutlifeinWilkes-Barre’sEastEnd.
 
K
PAGE 2A SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Kaminski,GregoryKendall,MaryKocylowski,ConstanceKolesar,CatherineMitchell,AlbertNalbone,LauraPrice,RonaldPolansky,MarthaSands,ChristopherSimms,EmmaSlusser,LillianTownley,BarryWilliamson,Jeanne
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 10A
BUILDINGTRUST
The Times Leader strives tocorrect errors, clarify storiesand update them promptly.Corrections will appear in thisspot. If you have informationto help us correct an inaccu-racy or cover an issue morethoroughly, call the newsroomat 829-7242.
PRASHANTSHITUT
President & CEO(570) 970-7158
pshitut@timesleader.com
JOEBUTKIEWICZ
VP/Executive Editor(570) 829-7249
 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
DENISESELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Officer(570) 970-7203
dsellers@timesleader.com
ALLISONUHRIN
VP/Chief Financial Officer(570) 970-7154
auhrin@timesleader.com
LISADARIS
VP/HRandAdministration(570) 829-7113
ldaris@timesleader.com
MICHAELPRAZMA
VP/Circulation(570) 970-7202
mprazma@timesleader.com
An company
timesleader.com
Newsroom
829-7242jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
 Jim McCabe – 829-5000jmccabe@timesleader.com
Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.45 per week in PA$4.85 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Impressions Media15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-071
G
regory S. Kaminski, RN, 50, of  Wilkes-Barre,passedawayMarch7, 2012 at the Wilkes-Barre GeneralHospital.Gregissurvivedbyhislifepartner,Brenda J. Harvey, with whom heshared 12 years of mutual love andsupport.Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was thesonofLeonardandRose(Fetzer)Ka-minski of Wilkes-Barre.Greg was a graduate of G.A.R.High School and Luzerne County Community College, where heearned Associate Degrees in Nursing andBusinessAdministration.Healsograduated with honors in September2011fromFortisInstitute,FortyFort.Greg loved his career in nursing andexcelledatcareoftheelderly.He was previously employed by Mercy Special Care Hospital, Nanticoke. Al-thoughhehadtoleavehisprofessionfollowing a back injury, he hoped tosomedayreturntonursing.Gregwasalways willing to help his neighborsandfriendswheneversomeoneneed-ed him.Surviving, in addition to his lifepartner,Brenda,andhisparents,Leo-nard and Rose, are his brothers, Leo-nard,Clayton,N.C.;Raymond,Nanti-coke, and Brian, Mountain Top; sis-ters, Linda Bradley, Waverly, Kansas;Suzanne Jackiewicz, Exeter; LauraSorokas, Plains Township, and Ro-sanneNiewinski,Nanticoke.Heisal-sosurvivedbyhisfive“babies,”Cloe, Tata, Sugar, Licorice, and especially Muffin.Hewillbesadlymissedbyhisgood friends, Peggy Sosnak and JimSnarski. Greg would also want tothank the Richard Macko family forthe care and support they gave himduring his early years.
Arrangementsare
bytheHughB.Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home,1044WyomingAvenue,FortyFort.InaccordancewithGreg’swishes,there will be no calling hours.Memorial contributions, if desir-ed,maybemadetotheBreastCancerResearch Foundation, 60 East 56thStreet, 8th Floor, New York, NY10022oronlineatwww.bcrfcure.org.
Gregory S. Kaminski
March 7, 2012
MoreObituaries,Page10A
HANOVERTWP.Tellingthestory of how someone tried toburn down the small market where Ray Black sells flowersand produce made him laugh.He wasn’t minimizing the seri-ousness of the crime, but instead was astonished at the ridiculousseriesofeventsthatoccurredlatelast month.“It was an arson,” Black, 71,said Saturday, showing the soot-covered walls inside Herold’sFarm Market on the Sans SouciParkway.It started as a burglary, howev-er.Possibly late on the night of Feb. 23 or early the next morn-ing, the glass entrance doors tothe market were smashed and apanel on the front wall was bust-ed, most likely to get at cash reg-ister inside, Black surmised.From there the register wascarried to a green house behindthe market and cut open with areciprocating saw.“There was nothing in it,Blacksaid.Theregisterandpiec-esofitwerefoundonthefloorof the greenhouse.Black retraced the path of de-struction, saying the burglar, who might have been angry about not finding any money inthe register, went back to themarket and lit a fire, destroying coolers, inventory and damaging the ceiling.“The fire must have put itself out,” said Black.Aschoolbuspicksuphisniecein front of the market and thedriver noticed something was wrong when she stopped themorning of Feb. 24.“Boy, that’s a shame what they did to the building,” the drivertold Black’s brother Brian whountil then was unaware of thedamage. He then contacted hisbrother.Police investigated andbroughtinastatepolicefiremar-shal for assistance. To date noone has been charged.Blackplacedtheinitialdamageestimate at $15,000 and said it willcostanadditional$20,000toreplacetheequipment,includinthe two scorched coolers sitting in the parking lot in front of thebuilding.He’s covered against the lossby insurance. That wasn’t thecase when he lost more than 3acres of hardy mums when theSusquehanna River reached a re-cordlevelof42.66feetonSept.9and overflowed its banks, reac-hingallthewaydowntothemar-ket that took on about 8 feet of  water.“We got hammered in theflood,” Black said.Hisfamilyhasbeenfarmingonthefertilelowlandsalongtheriv-er for nearly 120 years and hasbounced back from previous nat-ural disasters.He’ll recover from the latestman-made blunder and wantedhiscustomerstohearitfromhim.“IwantthemtoknowI’mgoing to be here,” he said.Painted in the windows of themarket was a sign reading,“Closed See You At Easter.”Black plans to be selling flow-ers the weekend before April 8.
Burglary, fire, flood don’t stop business
JERRY LYNOTT/THE TIMES LEADER
AdeliberatelysetfiredamagedHerold’sFarmMarketontheSansSouciParkway,HanoverTownship,andownerRayBlacksaiditwillreopenintimetosellflowersfortheEasterholiday.
Despite setbacks, Herold’sFarm Market plans to reopenbefore Easter to sell flowers.
ByJERRYLYNOTT 
 jlynott@timesleader.com
Contracts OK’d forinfrastructure projects
PLAINS TWP. – Townshipcommissioners approved con-tracts for two large infrastruc-ture projects during Thursday night’s regular meeting.Multiscape Inc., of Pittston, will be handling the First StreetCapital Improvements Projectfor $253,221. The work will include repav-ing and the addition of side- walks on First Street, whichruns between Mill Creek andthe former landfill in the Irish-town and Hudson sections of the township.Stell Enterprises, of Plains Township, will perform theAmesbury Street InfrastructureMaintenance Project for $237,861. This project will feature acomplete repaving after thestreet’s existing sewer pipes arereplaced with larger 30-inch and24-inch pipes.Also on Thursday, SolicitorStephen Menn advised theboard to table a vote for a condi-tional-use application that would have a junk yard andcrusher constructed at100 Sec-ond Street by Harry’s You-Pull-It.Menn cited the testimony  volunteered by various residentsand involved parties at a publichearing held earlier in March.Despite the volume of opin-ions expressed at the two-and-a-half hour meeting, the commis-sioners felt no closer to a deci-sion for or against. Menn point-ed out the board had 45 days tomake a decision. He assured thepublic the matter would berevisited, likely at the nextboard meeting.In other news, CommissionerJerry Yozwiak urged residentsto be vigilant regarding litterand illegal dumping within thetownship.He referenced recent cleanupefforts at Cleveland, Maffett andSouth Main streets among oth-ers, before stating the problemis far from over. He noted policeofficers and township officials were already on high alert,particularly with regard to thearea around the “Oakes area” onSouth Main Street.Yozwiak also announced thePlains Township Recycling Center on Cemetery Street willbe open for yard waste drop-offson Saturdays from 8 a.m.through noon.Yard waste pickups will beginon the week of April 30.Recyclables can be droppedoff at the sight Monday throughSaturday from 8 a.m. throughnoon.
 B. Garret Rogan
MEETINGS
PLAINSTWP.Somefamilieshave ties that bind over decadesof time and thousands of miles. The family of Wilkes-Barre na-tiveandWorldWarIIveteranJoeProeller is one of those families.FordecadestheymettocelebratehisbirthdayanddidsoagainSat-urday night at Andy’s Diner inPlains Township.Proellerturned99,spawningagatheringofmorethan60friendsand family coming from townsaround Northeastern Pennsylva-nia, as well as neighboring statesNew Jersey and Maryland, andnot so-neighboring ones as faraway as Colorado and Georgia.“It’s always great to see thefamily like this for a happy occa-sion,” Proeller said, enjoying hisdinner.Julie Dennis from SilverSpring, Md., Proeller’s grand-daughter, helped set up theevent, along with her mother, El-lenDennis,andsisterBecca.“It’slikeourfamilyreunion,”shesaid. Theygatheredathis70th,80thand 90th birthdays, then starting making it an annual event afterhis 95th birthday, she said. Thelast few were at Andy’s Diner.Dennis, who calls herself a“history buff,” researched hergrandfather’s youth to learn hespent48monthsintheSouthPa-cific during the war stationed allover the region. Most important-ly, he made it back, she said.He is the last surviving of 10siblings who were all born be-tween1906 and1924, she added.Proeller remains active by  walkingthroughWilkes-Barreona daily basis and by staying in- volved with the local Veterans of Foreign Wars and his church.Hismilitaryfriendsalsojoinedthe festivities, bestowing Proell-er with a birthday plaque in hishonor for the evening.Paul Poepperling, 95, fromKingston,saidheandProellerre-mained friends since the end of the war, marching in local pa-radesandattendingothermemo-rial functions over the years.“He’s a good man,” Poepper-ling said of Proeller.AndyHornick,whohasoperat-ed Andy’s Diner for the last 23 years, said the diner crews were working hard over the last few weeks to reopen after taking in 6feet of floodwater last fall. They reopened on Tuesday.
Wilkes-Barre man celebrates birthday and ties that bind
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
PaulPoepperling,94,shakeshandswithfellowWorldWarIIveter-anJosephProeller,99,atProeller’sbirthdayparty.
ByRALPHNARDONE 
Times Leader Correspondent
LOTTERYSUMMARY
DailyNumber,Midday
Sunday: 6-7-1Monday: 7-8-8Tuesday: 0-3-3Wednesday: 2-0-0Thursday: 9-9-8Friday: 5-4-7Saturday: 5-1-8
BigFour,Midday
Sunday: 2-5-4-3Monday: 6-3-4-1Tuesday: 9-1-4-3Wednesday: 4-6-6-7Thursday: 5-6-5-1Friday: 9-9-7-2Saturday: 0-7-3-9
Quinto,Midday
Sunday: 0-1-9-0-3Monday: 8-0-9-1-3Tuesday: 8-6-7-3-3Wednesday: 5-4-9-9-8Thursday:1-6-1-8-3Friday: 7-5-1-0-4Saturday: 9-7-2-8-2
TreasureHunt
Sunday: 02-11-14-20-26Monday: 01-11-16-21-25Tuesday: 04-11-13-21-29Wednesday: 01-04-10-12-27Thursday: 03-08-18-22-25Friday: 01-04-11-25-26Saturday: 02-10-16-18-25
DailyNumber,7p.m.
Sunday: 6-6-9Monday: 5-9-8Tuesday: 4-8-0Wednesday: 2-1-6 (7-7-6, doubledraw)Thursday: 8-4-7Friday:1-9-0Saturday: 7-5-0
BigFour,7p.m.
Sunday:1-1-9-9Monday:1-2-8-3Tuesday: 7-0-7-2Wednesday: 6-4-4-6Thursday: 8-4-3-8Friday: 7-0-2-0Saturday: 6-7-4-5
Quinto,7p.m.
Sunday: 9-9-8-5-6Monday: 2-2-0-8-4Tuesday: 9-6-3-9-2Wednesday: 5-4-1-3-4Thursday:1-2-6-3-7Friday:1-4-3-3-7Saturday:1-0-7-8-0
Cash5
Sunday: 01-04-16-17-31Monday: 05-09-23-40-43Tuesday:15-16-19-25-36Wednesday: 04-07-13-32-34Thursday: 04-21-31-33-43Friday:12-16-18-28-36Saturday: 04-15-20-27-30
Match6Lotto
Monday: 04-27-28-37-42-45Thursday: 07-29-35-44-46-49
Powerball
Wednesday:12-35-45-46-47powerball:12Saturday: 05-14-17-20-41powerball: 05
MegaMillions
Tuesday: 20-24-31-33-36Megaball: 44Megaplier: 04Friday: 09-10-27-36-42Megaball:11Megaplier: 04
ly in Missouri, where he spentthe day campaigning. Santorumhandily won Missouri’s primary last month, but the state’s dele-gates will be awarded in upcom-ing caucuses.Santorum spokesman HoganGidleysaidKansasshowsvotersare responding to his appeal."This is a great win for the cam-paign and further evidence thatconservatives and tea party loy-alists are uniting behind Rick asthetrue,consistentconservativein this race," he said.Santorum won 33 of the 40Kansas delegates; seven went toRomney. But Romney gained 22delegates Saturday from Guam,the Northern Mariana Islandsand the Virgin Islands. He alsoadded seven delegates and San-torum took three in the Wyom-ing caucuses, which concludedSaturday."In what was hyped as a big opportunity for Rick Santorum,he again fell short of making adent in Mitt Romney’s already large delegate lead," the Rom-ney campaign said in a state-ment.InKansas,Santorumreceived51percent of the votes, Romne21 percent, Gingrich 14 percentandTexasRep.Ron Paul 13percent.Romney andGingrichdownplayedtheir chancesin the dark-redstate, whereabortion re-mains a touch-stoneissueandcaucus voters tend to be thestate’s most conservative. Gin-grich canceled half a dozenevents in the state last week.Santorum visited Wednesday and Saturday.Paul, who campaigned Satur-day in the suburbs near KansasCity, told reporters that he hadno intention of exiting the race.Santorum’s triumph did notsurprise Joe Aistrup, a politicalscience professor at KansasState University who has writ-ten books on politics in Kansasand the South."To me, this is more aboutGingrich vs. Santorum, and thisis another nail in Newt Gin-grich’s coffin," he said."He is not the favored candi-date among evangelicals; Santo-rum is. Eventually this will paredowntoatwo-manrace.Theon-ly thing Santorum has to worry about is will it be soon enough."Aistrup said Alabama andMississippiaredo-or-dieforGin-grich, who moved toGeorgiaasateenagerand represented thestate in Congress fortwo decades.He has won only two states: Georgiaand neighborinSouth Carolina."The only thing that Newt has overRick is frankly thefactthathe’sfromtheSouth,andmaybe that might not beenough," Aistrup said."If he can’t win those twoSouthernstates,hiscandidacyisgone. He has nothing else to gofor."Gingrich, who has repeatedly pledged to take his campaign allthe way to the Republican presi-dential convention in Tampa,Fla., campaigned in Alabama onSaturday.Playing on his Southern ties,he mocked Romney for saying hewaslearningtosay"y’all"andlike grits.Kansas held caucuses in 96sites.More than 30,800 Republi-cans voted, 50 percent morethan in 2008 when Arizona Sen.John McCain had essentiall wrapped up the nomination.Kansans, however, went theirownconservativeway,votingforformer Arkansas Gov. MikeHuckabee.
SANTORUM
ContinuedfromPage1A
Santorum won 33 of the40 Kansas delegates;seven went to Romney.But Romney gained 22delegates Saturday fromGuam, the NorthernMariana Islands and theVirgin Islands.
 
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012 PAGE 3A
L
OCAL
timesleader.com
SCRANTON
Underage drinking cited
State police Bureau of Liquor Con-trol Enforcement officers assigned topatrol the St. Patrick’s Day ParadeSaturday issued 52 citations for under-age drinking. Two citation each werealso issued for disorderly conduct andcarrying false identification and one was issued for public drunkenness. The patrol lasted from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
 WASHINGTON
Barletta offers internships
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton,announced that several internships areavailable in both his Washington, D.C.,and Northeastern Pennsylvania dis-trict offices during the late spring andsummer months.Anyone over the age of18 can apply to be an intern. Internships do nothave a set start andend date; rather,those depend on theindividual student.Schedules are alsodetermined based onan intern’s availabil-ity. To apply, an in-terested studentshould email a resume and a coverletter to Barletta’s office at: PA11In-ternships@gmail.com.
 WILKES-BARRE
WWE Smackdown coming
 WWE Smackdown returns to Mohe-gan Sun Arena on May 22 at 7 p.m. Tickets are on sale at the arena,online at www.ticketmaster.com, or you can charge by phone at 800-745-3000 or any Ticketmaster outlet. The Main Event for the evening features Randy Orton versus Da-niel Bryan versusSheamus in a “Tri-ple Threat Match”for the WorldHeavyweightchampionship belt.Other stars scheduled to appearinclude The Big Show, Mark Henry,Cody Rhodes, Ted Dibiase, SantinoMarella, The Divas, Justin Gabriel andothers. The card is subject to change. Ticket prices are $15, $25, $35, $50and $95. All tickets are subject tofacility and convenience fees.
 WILKES-BARRE
Salvation Army market set
 The Salvation Army will hold its 8thAnnual Silent Auction and Flea Marketon April14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wilkes-Barre Corps,17 S. PennsylvaniaAve. The day will consist of 40 vendorflea market tables, more than100silent auction baskets containing itemsdonated by local businesses, foodconcessions and a bake sale.Flea market tables are available for$10. Those who are interested shouldsecure their table with their non-refun-dable payment by March 30. The fundraiser helps those whom The Salvation Army serves throughoutthe year.
 WILKES-BARRE
Man sentenced in arson
A man accused of setting fire to ahouse was sentenced Friday to eight to23 months in county prison on tworelated charges.Jason Wolfe, 24, of Church Street,Swoyersville, was sentenced on charg-es of arson and trespassing by LuzerneCounty Judge Fred Pierantoni. Wolfepleaded guilty to the charges in Janu-ary.Police say Wolfe set fire to a houseat 32-34 Evans St., Pringle, after anargument with a relative on Sept.11,according to a criminal complaint.
PLYMOUTH
Wilkes-Barre man charged
A man was arraigned Friday in Wilkes-Barre Central Court on chargeshe held his wife over a second floorporch railing.Andrew Coleman, 25, of Coal Street, was charged with reckless endanger-ing another person. He was releasedon $5,000 bail.Police charged Coleman after his wife, Autumn, claimed he grabbed herlegs and held her over a second floorrailing threatening to drop her during an argument Friday morning, accord-ing to the criminal complaint.
I N B R I E F
Barletta
Dictionary.D-I-C-T-I-O-N-A-R-Y.Dictionary.
 Noun.
A book containing a selectionof the words of a language and theirproper spellings, pronunciations andmeanings. Example: Sukanya Roy readthrough the entire dictionary during summer break in preparation for thespelling bee.Roy,14,ofSouthAbingtonTownship,said it took her a few months to finishreading the dictionary, but even thenhertaskwasn’tcomplete.Asshemovedthrough the eighth grade at AbingtonHeights Middle School, Roy said aftercompleting homework she would goback and study portions of the dictio-naryshewasn’tyetfamiliarwith.Sheal-so studied word origins and patterns inlanguages.Herhardworkpaidoffwhenshewonthe 2009, 2010 and 2011Times Leader/Scripps NEPA Regional Spelling Bee,and finally the Scripps National Spell-ing Bee in 2011.Based on her experience, Roy, now afreshman at Wyoming Seminary inKingston, has some advice to participa-nts in the first round of this year’s bee,being held today at the Woodlands Inn& Resort in Plains Township.“Don’t be afraid to ask questions when you are at the microphone, be-cause it really helps,” she counsels.Another thing she found useful wasthestudyguideontheScrippsNationalSpellingBeewebsite,www.spellingbee-.com and on www.merriam-web-ster.com.She also said it helps to think about
SPELLING BEE
National champion says participating in the event helped her grow in many areas
Advice to wanna-bee spellers
ByLIZBAUMEISTER 
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
SUBMITTED PHOTO
National spelling bee champ SukanyaRoy,14, South Abington Township.
See BEE, Page 4A
According to the Scripps National Spell-ing Bee website, www.spellingbee.com,the term first appeared in print in1875,but no one is sure where it originated.“Bee” refers to a social event at whichpeople gather for a single activity, andother early examples of use are “huskingbee,” “apple bee,” and “logging bee.” It isspeculated that the word may refer tothe example of a busy beehive, or issimply a shortened version of the word“been.” The origin, however, remains amystery.
SPELLING BEEORIGIN
Fourteen students from King’s Col-lege are volunteering their time to giveback to the local communities whileearning money for school.As part of the federally funded Amer-icorps program, they are helping local youth in tutoring programs or as partof the Big Brothers Big Sisters pro-gram, helped victims of the recentflooding, contribute to programs forthe elderly, participate in communitfairs and more.Kim Fabbri, coordinator of scholar-ships in service at King’s, said the col-lege has been involvedin Americorps forabout six years andforesees the programgrowing.“It’s a wonderful op-portunity for studentsto offer their servicesand earn money forschool,” she said.Students involved inthe program complete300 hours of their timein one year to qualify for $1,100 to $1,400 ineducation awards fromthe Corporation forNational and Commu-nity Service. Forty-eight students haveparticipated so far andearned the scholarshipawards, she said.In addition to helping the communi-ty, they learn valuable skills they willuse in their future career endeavors,Fabbri added. Some continue to be in- volved in Americorps after their gradu-ations, she said.“They grow as people,” Fabbri said.Carissa Smith, an elementary educa-tion student in her junior year atKing’s, said she is currently in her sec-ond year volunteering with Ameri-corps.“I like see the difference we are mak-ing,” said Smith. She volunteered withthe Salvation Army to provide gifts forflood victims during the holidays.“Even though we were giving smallgifts, without them many of the flood victims would have received nothing,”she said.She is now volunteering with early education children in the Wilkes-Barrearea.She sees how Americorps helps herdevelop professional skills for her fu-ture in teaching, where her focus istrying to make a difference in the livesof children.Liz Demko, a special education andelementary education student in her ju-nior year, said Americorps provides thechance to “give back.”
Students atKing’s learnabout helpingin program
The college has been involved inAmericorps for about six years andforesees the program growing.
ByRALPHNARDONE 
Times Leader Correspondent
Carissa Smith,an elementaryeducationstudent in her junior year atKing’s, saidshe is cur-rently in hersecond yearvolunteeringwith Amer-icorps. “I liketo see thedifference weare making,”said Smith.
KINGSTON TWP. – Last year, vol-unteers with the Trucksville UnitedMethodist Church’s Appalachian Ser- vice Project team worked with needy families in West Virginia. Thissummer’sgroupwillheadtoru-ral Tennessee. The2012missionwillmarkonlythesecond annual trip for the group fromthe Trucksville congregation. To help fund the mission trip inJune,thechurchheldahome-styletur-key dinner on Saturday evening. TheAppalachianServiceProjectisamissionary group that provides sup-port and services to underprivilegedfamilies along the Appalachian Moun-tains of West Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee.According to church officials, this year’s trip will include 10 high school-aged volunteers and four adult chap-erones. They hope to raise $8,000 insupport of their missionary effort."I’m really excited about this year’smission," said project co-organizer,Rob Mattson, of Kingston Township."Lastyear,mytwinsonsBryceandTra- vis (17) volunteered for the trip to WestVirginia.Thisyear,mydaughter’sold enough to go."Mattson said the group meetsthroughouttheyeartotraintheyoung  volunteersinthebasicsofthebuilding trades and also sensitivity training in working with the spiritual and eco-nomic needs of the selected Appala-chian families."We’re hoping that through this ex-perience,thekidswillcatchthebug,soto speak, and bring home a sense of service to our local area," continuedMattson.AccordingtotheASPwebsiteatAS-P.org, the goal of the volunteers’ an-nual missions is to make the homes of their mission families "warmer, safety and drier.""People actual need to witness thelevel of poverty firsthand," stressedMattson. "Words can’t adequately ex-plain what I witnessed with my mis-sion family’s situation last year."Anyonewantingfurtherinformationor to donate time or money shouldcontact RobMattson atrobertwmatt-son@aol.com.
APPALACHIAN SERVICE PROJECT
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
The Trucksville United Methodist Church’s Appalachian Service Project members hosted a turkey dinner Saturdayevening to raise funds for this year’s mission trip.
Mission of service
Trucksville United MethodistChurch team will go to Tennesseein June to help needy families.
BySTEVENFONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
 The movement pressing for the ar-rest of Ugandan militia leader JosephKony has come to Northeastern Penn-sylvania. The online awareness campaign,launched Monday morning by humanrights nonprofit Invisible Children, by Saturday had inspired planned eventsin Dallas, Hazleton and Scranton tospread awareness of the rebel leader’scrimes against children and to pressthe American government to continueproviding military support until Kony is captured.Invisible Children, which has pro-motedawarenessofatrocitiescommit-ted by Kony’s militia – the Lord’s Re-sistance Army – since 2004, on Mon-day posted a 30-minute video provid-ing a simplified summary of Kony’s war crimes. Those crimes, according to the group, include the kidnapping,indoctrination and deployment of thousands of child soldiers. The group has since faced criticismfor oversimplifying a complicated po-liticalsituation,advocatingsupportfor
Events to spread awareness for Kony arrest movement
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Kony 2012 fliers atWeis Markets storein Dallas. The onlineawareness cam-paign hopes tospread awarenessof the rebel leader’scrimes againstchildren and topress the Americangovernment tocontinue providingmilitary supportuntil Kony is cap-tured.
Online campaign about Ugandanmilitia leader inspires events inDallas, Hazleton and Scranton.
ByMATTHUGHES 
 mhughes@timesleader.com
See KONY, Page11A

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