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Education for Citizenship

Education for Citizenship

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Education for citizenshipand the teaching ofdemocracy in schools
Final report of the Advisory Group on Citizenship22 September 1998
 
First published by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority on behalf of the CitizenshipAdvisory Group© Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 1998
Reproduction, storage, adaptation or translation, in any form or by any means, of thispublication is prohibited without prior written permission of the publisher, unless within theterms of licences issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency. Excerpts may be reproduced forthe purpose of research, private study, criticism or review, or by educational institutionssolely for educational purposes, without permission, providing full acknowledgement isgiven.Printed in Great Britain.The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority is an exempt charity under Schedule 2 of theCharities Act 1993.Qualifications and Curriculum Authority29 Bolton StreetLondon W1Y 7PD
The Young People’s Parliament, Birmingham, (YPP)
Educating for Democracy
– gives youngpeople in Birmingham and the West Midlands a voice - whether on school, local quality of life orwider national issues; and on global concerns such as sustainable development and human rights.The initiative is a partnership between The University of the First Age, Birmingham City Counciland the new centre for learning and leisure, Millennium Point. Already by using ICT, websites,video conferencing and e-mail, as well as use of the City’s Council Chamber, the young people of Birmingham and beyond have been able to participate in two pilot projects. The General Electionproject in 1997 linked young people in the West Midlands directly with politicians and provided alively and robust exchange of views. The first G8 Young People’s Summit (YPS) was held in May1998 to coincide with the G8 Summit meeting in Birmingham. Two youth delegates came fromeach of the G8 countries as well as the EU. A communiqué was drafted, mainly on the issues of third world debt relief, after a meeting with the Prime Minister. It made a powerful statement forthe right of young people to be heard in international affairs.
The Youth Parliament Competition
is now in its eighth year, organised by the CitizenshipFoundation and sponsored by Motorola. Each participating secondary school holds a mockparliamentary session of the pupils’ own choosing. There are ministers and shadow ministersand a host of backbenchers on both sides. A twenty minute video of the debate is sent to regionaljudges and regional winners are then judged by a national panel. There is also a separate politicalwriting competition. The national winners are invited to a presentation at the Houses of Parliament to receive their prizes and to meet senior politicians. The entry for this year’s nationalwinner (for the second time), St Michael’s Roman Catholic School, Billingham, Cleveland,included Prime Minister’s Questions and the pollution tax debate. The leading roles went to Year11 students with Year 7 pupils providing the bulk of the backbenchers.
Youth Parliaments
– currently a large initiative is being developed by the Department forEducation and Employment and the Department for the Environment, Transport and Regions, tohold a national Children’s Parliament competition for primary schools, on local, regional and thennational levels. The issues debated will be environmental and there will also be an essaycompetition. Youth Parliaments are also organised by the Council for Education in WorldCitizenship, which involve role-play and are based on an international problem (we saw one atBrighton on the international drugs trade).
 
Page
Foreword
by Rt Hon Betty Boothroyd, MP,
Speaker of the House of Commons
3
Terms of reference
4
Membership of the Advisory Group
5
Introductory note
6
PART ONE: INTRODUCTION
1Preface
7
 2What we mean by Citizenship
9
3Citizenship: the need and aims
13
PART TWO: RECOMMENDATIONS
4Essential recommendations
22
5The way forwar
24
5.1Learning outcomes for Citizenship Education
24
5.2Phasing in the statutory Order for Citizenship Education
24
5.3Active citizenship both inside the school and relating to the community
25
5.4The teaching of controversial issues
27
5.5Implications for post-16 learning
27
5.6A note on assessment
28
5.7Implications for agencies
29
5.8Implications for the work of OFSTED
29
5.9Implications for the work of the TTA
30
5.10Resourcing Citizenship Education
32
5.11Recommendations for the terms of reference and the composition of thestanding Commission on Citizenship Education
33
PART THREE: SPELLING IT OUT
6Framework for Citizenship Education: learning outcomes
35
6.1Rationale
35
6.2Guiding principles
35
Contents
1

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