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The Sierra Vista Herald - Monday March 19, 2012

The Sierra Vista Herald - Monday March 19, 2012

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Published by: The Sierra Vista Herald on Mar 19, 2012
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BY BILL HESS
HERALD/REVIEW
SIERRA VISTA — A seriesof questions were asked of the four GOP candidates forthe special CongressionalDistrict 8 seat during an eve-ning dinner of the 1200 Club.Nearly 100 people were inattendance and heard thequartet of hopefuls answerfour questions, which ad-dressed how to protect FortHuachuca from any futureBase Realignment and Clo-sure Commission action,being part of a politicalteam, border security andhow to mobilize the Republi-can party.Responding were StateSen. Frank Antenori, JesseKelly, Dave Sitton and Mar-tha McSally.Of the quartet, three haveserved in the military — Mc-Sally in the Air Force, Kellyin the Marine Corps and An-tenori in the Army. Sittonhas actively supported themilitary by being a memberof various organizations,such as the Davis-Monthan50 in Tucson.The foursome are seekingthe party’s nod to take onDemocrat Ron Barber andGreen Party member Char-lie Manolakis, both of whomhave no primary competi-tion, during the April 17 spe-cial primary.The Republican winnerwill face Barber and Mano-lakis in the June 12 specialgeneral election to fill theunexpired term of formerDemocratic U.S. Rep. Gabri-elle Giffords who resigned inJanuary, slightly more thana year after being shot inthe head during an event inTucson.Following are synopsesof the GOP candidates’ re-sponses, in alphabeticalorder. They responded tothe queries in round-robinfashion at the event held atthe Pueblo del Sol CountryClub, after making openingcomments.
SIERRA VISTA
 
SIERRA VISTA
The Herald
 
NEWS ONLINE AT WWW.SVHERALD.COM MONDAY MARCH 19, 2012 75¢
KENNEL CLUB EVENTSET FOR APRIL 28
NEWS, A3
GO TO THE DOGSMARCH MADNESS
SPORTS B1IN MONEY
HUACHUCA CITY STORETO HOLD OPEN HOUSE
HAY AND FEED
NCAA ROUNDUP: SPARTANSWIN, ADVANCE TO SWEET 16
WINDY, SHOWERS
High: 49 Low: 30
This paper is publishedfor
 Jim Niner
of 
 Huachuca City
and therest of Cochise County.
INDEX
CALENDAR A2OPINION A4MOVIE LISTINGS A5MONEY C1SPORTS B1COMICS B4ADVICE B4CROSSWORD B5CLASSIFIED D1
EVENT OF THE DAY
The Center for Lifelong Learning
will present Identity Theftwith Robert Garcia from 12:10 to 1 p.m. March 21 in room 702 atthe Sierra Vista campus. Garcia is a retired Tucson Police officerand Identity Theft Expert. For details, visit www.cochise.edu/cll.
Uterhardt  warns of  budget cuts
BY DANA COLE
HERALD/REVIEW
TOMBSONTE — In his re-port during the TombstoneUnified District governingboard meeting Wednesdayevening,Superinten-dent KarlUterhardtwarned thatthe statewill be tak-ing a per-centage of the district’ssoft capitaland unre-strictedcapital fromthe budgetagain thisyear.“We’renot sure how much it’s goingto be, but we do know thebudget cuts are coming,”Uterhardt said. “Our Main-tenance and Operations bud-get will remain the same,but we will be losing somesoft capital and unrestrictedcapital funding.”TUSD will be depending onstudent enrollment increasesin order to make up for thedifference. Overall, the dis-trict received $120,000 morethis year because of studentgrowth, Uterhardt noted.Board member LillianHritz asked why the districtdoes not have budget worksessions to allow staff to pro-vide input on purchases andaddress budgetary consid-erations when emergenciesoccur. Hritz said in otherdistricts, staff members areallowed to provide input forbudget issues. “We’re gettinghanded a budget without anydiscussion,” she said. “Therehas got to be a way to appro-priate our money and use itmore wisely.The possibility of hold-ing a budget work session issomething board presidentJeff Crandall said he put onthe next board meeting’sagenda for discussion.Related to the budget
BY SHAR PORIER
HERALD/REVIEW
BISBEE — Water contin-ues to be a problem for theLa Marquesa conservationsubdivision in the ThreeCanyons area.During Wednesday’s meet-ing, the county Planning andZoning commissioners unan-imously denied the request-ed waiver to allow developerPatrick Kirk to install indi-vidual wells rather than con-nect to Liberty Water Com-pany that provides water de-livery in that area.The county believes thatpeople on a water system useless water than if they havewells on the basis that pay-ing for water makes peoplemore aware of their waterusage.Kirk has asked the com-missioners three times towaive that condition that isplaced on all subdivisionsin the Sierra Vista sub-watershed. Liberty Watercharges a steep price for pipeinstallations and hook-ups,which adds to the price of the 103 lots on the 317-acredevelopment.He told the commissionersthat the state told him thereis no firm data that showsthat people with wells usemore water than those witha water company.The commissioners didgrant him a fourth tem-porary plat extension asrequested.Mary Jones received a rec-ommendation for approval
Buena freshman Adam Douglass works out under thewatchful eye of senior Gloria Kostur as she mans the HOSA(Health Occupation Students of America) station duringSTEM night. Kostur is a member of the Medical Club of Buena, which promotes jobs in the medical field.
PHOTOS BY MARK LEVY • HERALD/REVIEW
Buena High School senior Jeannette Betz, left, and junior Rose Elam use Betz’s TI89 calculator to send information to a robotic cart tell-ing it how fast to go and what to do during Buena’s annual Science, Technology, Engineering, Math or STEM night. Betz attached bal-loons with a straight pin on them to the robotic carts for a jousting game.
BY JACOB PETERSEN
HERALD/REVIEW
SIERRA VISTA — Joiningthe national push to get highschool kids more interestedand involved in science, tech-nology, engineering, and math,the second ever Family STEMNight was hosted by membersof the Buena High School De-nominator Club on Thursdaynight at Buena.And with grant support fromthe Sierra Vista Women’s Cluband the Academic BoosterClub, there were more than 60stations spread throughout thecafeteria with different activi-ties relating to STEM subjects.“There is a lot of fun in mathand science and so many kidsget to see just the homeworkand not the fun applications,”said Buena Math Departmentchair and junior/senior-levelmath instructor Sandee Tre-vino as she described the pur-pose behind the event.“So few people are going intocomputer science and its ascary thing not to have thoseresources,” she said, addingthat STEM subjects are of great importance to not onlyAmerican children, but to thenational security of Americaitself.“We are really lagging ingetting kids excited in thesefields,” Trevino said.But with so many things to
Water remains issue for subdivision
Event aims to spark interest in math, science
CD8 candidates talk teamwork, border security and keeping the fort open
STEM NIGHT
See
WATER
, Page
A3
See
CANDIDATES
, Page
A8
See
BUDGET
, Page
A8
“W
E
 
DON
T
 
KNOW
 
HOW
 
MUCH
 
IT
S
 
GOING
 
TO
 
BE
,
BUT
 
WE
 
DO
 
KNOW
 
THE
 
BUDGET
 
CUTS
 
ARE
 
COMING
.
See
STEM
, Page
A8
 
The March 30 dead-line is quickly ap-proaching to have ap-plications submittedfor “Operation Paint-brush 2012.”90.9 The Spark,Southern Arizona’spremiere Christianradio station, is hostinga community serviceproject called, “Opera-tion Paint Brush 2012.”The Spark will bepainting the exteriorof homes in CochiseCounty, free of charge,for those who qualifyfor the program.Partnering with TheSpark this year aretheir sponsors, TheHome Depot,
The Si-erra Vista Herald 
andBehr Paints.This project wasfounded by Arron Dan-iels, project director for90.9 The Spark.“Operation Paint-brush is our way of helping those in ourcommunity who needit,” says Daniels. “AsChristians we aretaught to help those inneed and this is a greatway to do it with nostrings attached.In order to qualify tohave your home paint-ed, applicants must bea homeowner currentlyliving in the home andbe income qualified ac-cording to the standardsof Cochise County.To apply for the pro-gram, download theapplication from TheSpark website (www.sparkfm.com) or pickone up at the SparkStudios, located at 3320E. Fry Blvd., in SierraVista.All applications mustbe received or post-marked no later thanMarch 30, 2012. Thisprogram is open to Co-chise County residentsonly.Paint Day is sched-uled for Saturday,May 19, and those whowish to join a team tohelp paint the exteriorof homes or donateto the project shouldcall The Spark at 452-8022. All donationsmade to the project aretax-deductible.
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A2
HERALD/REVIEW
N
EWS
 
MONDAY MARCH 19, 2012
CONTACT US
Around Your Townlists communityevents open to thepublic. Please senditems at least twoweeks in advanceto jacob.petersen@svherald.com.
 
Itemswill be publishedbased on the orderthey occur and notin the order they arereceived. All entriesare subject to beingedited for spaceand content. Dueto the popularity of this section, mostentries can onlybe published twoor three days priorto the date of theevent.
A
ROUND
 
YOUR
 
TOWN
PHOTOS BY MELISSA MARSHALLHERALD/REVIEW
Above: Members of the62nd Army band get readyto perform on Sunday atthe Ethel Berger center.Left: SSG James P. Sproulperforms Joseph Turrin’s“Caprice” during the 62ndArmy Band trumpet recitalon Sunday at the EthelBerger Center.The Democratic Womenof Southeastern Arizona’s
next meeting will be held at11 a.m. March 20 at Pueblodel Sol Country Club. Theguest speaker will be Ms.Kelly Canady, the southernArizona field director of Or-ganize for America. Kelly willexplain the work of Organizefor America. Reservationsfor lunch must be made bycontacting Pat at 459-1054or 456-5596. Price of the lun-cheon is $14.
Master Gardeners Train-ing
begins March 20. Classeswill meet from 10 a.m. to1 p.m. each Tuesday for 14weeks beginning March20 at the University of Ari-zona South. Sessions coverbasic botany, soil science,entomology, pesticide use,landscape design, plant pa-thology and more. The costfor the classes is $120 and in-cludes the Master Gardenermanual and shirt. To register,call 458-8278 (ext. 2141).
The Huachuca Audu-bon Society
will welcomeArizona State University re-searchers to its next monthlymeeting. They hope tocollaborate with the HAS inobtaining data on bird spe-cies. The public is invited tothis meeting at 7 p.m. March20, in room 702 at CochiseCollege.
The Center for LifelongLearning
will presentIdentity Theft with RobertGarcia from 12:10 to 1 p.m.March 21 in room 702 at theSierra Vista campus. Garcia, aretired Tucson Police officerand Identity Theft Expert,will help prepare you in theevent that your identity isstolen and educate you onidentity theft programsavailable. For details, visitwww.cochise.edu/cll.
The Huachuca Mineraland Gem Club
will meetat 7 p.m. March 21 in theConference Room in the Co-chise College Library. AudraWerkheiser will present aprogram on the geology of Kartchner Caverns beforethe business meeting. Thepublic is welcome to themeeting. For details, call In-grid at 459-3718.
The SoutheasternArizona Contractors As-sociation
will meet at 11:30a.m. March 21 at the Pueblodel Sol Country Club. ScottWareing, one of the part-ners of Paffenbarger andWalden Construction Bonds,will be the speaker. Scott’spresentation will be on “Un-derstanding Surety Bonds –Information for Contractorsand Government Reps.” Thepublic is invited to attend.Lunch is $15 at the door.
The Knights of Colum-bus
will host a seafood din-ner from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.March 23, and 30 at the hall,256 Kayetan Dr. There is a $5cover for musical entertain-ment that can be waivedwith the purchase of a meal.For details, call 458-3939.
A Spring Break FarmTour at Dad’s Farm
willbe offered from 9 a.m. to 2p.m. March 23 at the farm,30 W. Ivey Rd. in HuachucaCity, just one mile north of Mustang Corners on Hwy 90.Admission for the tour andactivities is $5 per person.For details, call (520) 285-6316. The tour is sponsored jointly by Sierra Vista FarmersMarket and Baja Arizona Sus-tainable Agriculture (BASA).
 Jennie Lovorn is a Ca-dette Girl Scout
who isseeking donations to beau-tify the Southern ArizonaVeterans’ Cemetery kiosk.She plans to do the work on March 24 and is seekingdonations to go towardthe purchase of suppliesincluding, $415 for gravel,$200 for plants, and $125for irrigation materials. Anyexcess funds will be usedto purchase a bench. Fordetails, call 458-7144 or visitwww.savmcf.org. Donationsshould be made out to theSAVMCF and sent to 1300Buffalo Soldier Trail, SierraVista, AZ 85635.
An AARP Driver SafetyClass
will be held from 9a.m. to 1:30 p.m. March 24at the Sierra Vista PoliceDepartment, 911 CoronadoDr. To register, call (520) 234-1120 by March 22.
The High Desert Craft-ers’ Craft Fair
will be heldfrom 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.March 24 at the Winde-mere Hotel and ConferenceCenter, 2047 S. Hwy. 92. Inattendance will be the TheGolden K Kiwanis Club of Sierra Vista, which will hosta bake sale, and The Hum-mingbird Stitchers QuiltGuild, which will be showingits 2013 Raffle Quilt.
The Friends of the SanPedro River
will conductinterpretive walks along theriver at 9 a.m. March 24 and31. All walks depart from theSan Pedro House, 9800 E.Hwy. 90, Sierra Vista. Thereis no charge for the walks,however donations are ac-cepted. For more informa-tion call (520) 459-2555.
Fry Chapter 14
will holdits next meeting at 1 p.m.March 24 at 4001 E. Foothills.An election committee willbe appointed. Please mark your calendars and planto attend so that you canrenew old friendships withother DAV members.
The UsTOO prostate can-cer support group
in SierraVista will stand with Susan G.Komen For the Cure SE AZ toraise funds for breast canceron March 25 in Tucson. Go tohttp://komenaz.org for de-tails. For more information,call George at 803-1409.
‘Operation Paintbrush’ to put fresh coat on area homes
 
MONDAY MARCH 19, 2012
N
EWS
 
HERALD/REVIEW
A3
to rezone a portion of aparcel in Elfrida fromTR-18 (transitionalresidential on 18,000square feet) to GeneralBusiness like the restof the parcel from thecommissioners.This legitimizes a U-Haul business and acoffee shop on locatedHighway 191.The matter will nowgo before the CochiseCounty Board of Super-visors for final rezon-ing approval.A second rezoning,this one a down-zoning,was also unanimouslygranted to Bo Hodaiwho owns two TR-36 (asingle-family residenceon a 36,000 square footlot) and wanted themcombined so he canbuild his own home.Anyone owning fouracres or more can takeadvantage of the coun-ty’s owner-builder opt-out clause.Hodai plans to builda very small homeserved by solar power, just 200-square feet,near Elfrida off RuckerCanyon Road on thefive acres.That will also gobefore the board of supervisors for finalapproval.A special use per-mit was unanimouslygranted to Zane Riten-our to establish a pow-der coating business ina general business dis-trict on Fry Boulevard.
WATER:
Other requests approved include special use permit for business 
FROM PAGE A1
A
T
 
A
 
GLANCE
Local birders now being recruited for study
Dr. Julie Stromberg, a professor at ArizonaState University, is leading a team of scientistsin a project taking place in the HuachucaMountains. The study is being conducted forthe Department of Defense, and Stromberg isrecruiting local birders to take part.According to Stromberg, the military isbeing proactive in investigating how climatechange and water availability might impactfuture management decisions. Grant moneyfrom the Department is funding researchers instudies to help understand ephemeral streamsin the vicinity of multiple defense installationsin the southwestern U.S. Stromberg’s projectinvolves eight study sites in each of threecanyons: Ramsey, Garden, and Huachuca.“We are in our third year of data collection,“Stromberg said. “And it hit me: We have a lotof experienced local bird experts right here inthe Huachuca area.”So, she contacted Tricia Gerrodette,president of the Huachuca Audubon Society.As a result, the scientists are now recruitingexperienced birders from Huachuca Audubonand from the broader birding public. Thesevolunteers will collect data at the study sitesin May and June (for breeding birds), andNovember and December (for resident birds).One of the researchers, Hillary Nicholasfrom the University of Arizona, will speak atthe next Audubon meeting, Tuesday evening.She will describe the project, show slides of where the study sites are located, and explainhow local “citizen scientists” will be able tocontribute to the effort.The public is invited to the HuachucaAudubon Society’s meeting at 7 p.m. March 20in Room 702 at Cochise College. Experiencedlocal birders who are interested in helpingwith this research project, or who just wantadditional information, can contact TriciaGerrodette at 378-4937 or Triciag2@cox.net.
Friends of San Pedro to train new docents
Do you have a love of nature? Are youinterested in sharing that love with others inthe community? Would you like to learn moreabout the San Pedro River environment?The Friends of the San Pedro River (FSPR)are looking for people with these qualitiesto be docents. The FSPR Docent trainingclass will be starting soon. Join us for fourThursday evening classes (6:30 to 9:30 p.m.)and three Saturday morning classes (8:30 a.m.to noon) beginning April 5.Classes will be presented by local expertson birds, plants, insects, hydrology, geology,and much, much more. The cost is only $25(for materials and is refundable after 50 hoursof “docenting.”) The San Pedro River is awonderful local resource.Learn more about it and the wildlife andshare that knowledge with others. Thetraining is fun, informative and, as a docent,you get to work with great people. To register,call 459-2555 or e-mail fspr@sanpedroriver.org.
Former sheriff sentenced in cocaine case
TUCSON — Former Deputy Sheriff JesusRene Contreras, 31, of Nogales, was sentencedon Tuesday by Senior U.S. District JudgeMarvin Aspen to six years in federal prisonfor conspiracy to possess with the intent todistribute cocaine. Contreras pleaded guilty tothe charge on July 14, 2011.Court documents state that Contreras andhis co-conspirator, Ernesto Castro, reachedan agreement with another individual forContreras to use his position as a deputysheriff to transport cocaine past the BorderPatrol checkpoint on Interstate 19. On March2, 2010, Contreras drove approximately 4.9kilograms of cocaine past the Border Patrolcheckpoint while in uniform and driving hisofficial Santa Cruz County patrol vehicle.Castro was sentenced on Sept. 26, 2011, to sixyears imprisonment for this offense and arelated supervised release violation.“When law enforcement officers engage incorrupt activities while in official uniform,they not only violate the public’s trust, butthey also put our communities’ safety at risk,”said Acting U.S. Attorney Ann BirminghamScheel. “The United States Attorney’s Officeremains committed to working with our lawenforcement partners to find and prosecutethose who engage in border corruption. Icommend DHS and the FBI for their successfulinvestigation of this case.”The investigation in this case was conductedby the U.S. Department of HomelandSecurity, Office of the Inspector General;and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’sSouthern Arizona Corruption Task Force.The prosecution was handled by Mary SueFeldmeier and Robert A. Fellrath, AssistantU.S. Attorneys, District of Arizona, Tucson.
Border watch group on the decline in state
PHOENIX — The Minuteman border-watchmovement that exploded in southern Arizonain the last decade has virtually disappeared,according to a new report from an Alabama-basedcivil rights center that monitors such groups.
The Arizona Daily Star 
reports ( that anannual report by the Southern Poverty LawCenter said the drop comes after members’concerns about illegal immigration have beenadopted by other groups and state legislatures.In 2011, the number of groups termed bythe center as “nativist extremists” — such asthe Minuteman — declined by 42 percent, thecenter’s report said. But at the same time thecenter said the number of anti-government“Patriot” groups grew to record levels.The center began tracking what it calls“nativist extremist” groups after theMinuteman movement exploded in the mid-2000s. These groups distinguish themselvesfrom regular anti-illegal-immigration opinionby directly confronting suspected illegalimmigrants.
FROM PRESS RELEASES AND WIRE REPORTS
‘Going to the Dogs’ plannedfor April 28 at Arbenz Field
Care for the Horses plans 2nd Equine Expo
Pursuit lasting 20 minutes ends with arrest of female
BY JACOB PETERSEN
HERALD/REVIEW
SIERRA VISTA — Atabout 5:28 a.m. Sundaymorning, an attemptedtraffic stop turned intoa vehicle pursuit afterthe driver of a vehicleseen traveling withoutits headlights activatedattempted to flee frompolice.According to Sgt. An-thony Venditto withthe Sierra Vista PoliceDepartment, the driverof the vehicle, Dani-elle McKay, 24, wascaptured by officersroughly 20 minutesafter the initial trafficstop was attempted atAvenida Cochise andOakmont Drive, nearthe mall.“She used mostlymajor arterials (mainroads),” Venditto said,describing how the sus-pect first fled south be-fore heading back northand facing capture onNelson Drive, just off Charmichael Avenue.At one point, the sus-pect fled far enoughsouth that the CochiseCounty Sheriff’s Officewas notified, althoughSierra Vista Policehandled the pursuit.“Calls were madeto the county, but of course this was a dy-namic vehicle pursuit,”Venditto said.As a result of thechase, McKay has beencharged with felonyfleeing and aggravat-ed assault on a policeofficer.Although no police of-ficers were hurt duringthe incident, “It lookslike she did damage apatrol vehicle with thevehicle she was in,”Venditto said, explain-ing the assault charge.McKay also facescharges of unlawful useof transportation, Ven-ditto said, because “ap-parently this was a ve-hicle she did not own.”There were no inju-ries or reports of prop-erty damage aside fromthat done to the policevehicle, Venditto said,adding that drugs andalcohol are not suspect-ed to be a factor in thepursuit because therewere no charges filedto that effect.However, Vendittosaid, “I would considerthis to be an ongoinginvestigation. Theremay be additionalcharges.”
BY DANA COLE
HERALD/REVIEW
PALOMINAS — Carefor the Horses, a localequine rescue group,is announcing its sec-ond Equine Expo onApril 14, an event thatfeatures lectures andlabs by local veterinar-ian, Dusti Prentice.The event will be heldfrom 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. atRockin JP Ranch, 10522S. Dove Song Lane, off Highway 92.Preregistration is re-quired, with a deadlineof April 1, 2012. Registeronline by going to www.careforthehorses.comor contact Ann Jost at559-2224. Tickets are $35each and include day-long lectures, labs, doorprizes and lunch. Thecost for participants 17and under is $20.This marks the sec-ond expo for Care forthe Horses, with allproceeds from theevent going to the orga-nization and its equinerescue efforts. The or-ganization also assistshorse owners with vet-erinary and feed ex-penses when unexpect-ed hardships occur.The horse owners enterinto a contract withCare for the Horses andrepay the loan whentheir financial situa-tion improves.Prentice, who will bepresenting “How to beYour Own Vet — someof the time,” says sheenjoys conducting edu-cational presentationsand helping horse own-ers become more knowl-edgeable about generalhealth, nutrition andprevention issues.“This event is similarto the first expo that Iput on, which was afirst aid clinic and labto educate the public onprincipals of examina-tion and first aid care,”said Prentice. “It hadgood attendance, withabout 130 people. We’rehoping for a similarturn-out at this event.”Along with Prentice,Animal CommunicatorLinda Johns will be oneof the presenters, as wellas Stephanie McLean of Purina who will be dis-cussing nutrition. AnnGallus will talk aboutEmergency Prepared-ness, something thatbecame a pressing issueamong horse ownersduring last summer’sMonument Fire. Therealso will be a demon-stration on how to prop-erly fit a saddle.“All proceeds for thisexpo stay right in thecommunity and benefitCare for the Horses,”said Jost, who is theorganization’s founderand president.“We’re a non-profit,501 (c) organization thatis completely dedicatedto rescuing horses thathave been abused orneglected, rehabilitat-ing the horses, and thenplacing them in goodhomes,” she said.The organization wasstarted by Jost in 2002after she discoveredeleven starving horseswhile out trail riding.Since its inception,more than 200 horseshave been rescued bythe organization.
BY DANA COLE
HERALD/REVIEW
SIERRA VISTA — With itsfocus of “promoting responsibledog ownership,” the Greater Si-erra Vista Kennel Club invitesthe community to “Going to theDogs” on April 28.The day-long event is from 9a.m. to 3 p.m. at Arbenz Field inSierra Vista, near the commu-nity center.Activities will kick off with anAmerican Kennel Club Matchfeaturing conformation, obedi-ence and Rally competitions,with mixed breeds welcome tocompete in obedience and Rally.There also will be junior show-manship for young people. Inaddition, the Canine Good Citi-zen Test will be offered for allthose interested in having theirdogs tested.“A match is just like a dogshow, only there are no pointsawarded,” said Rene Politi, along-time GSVKC member whois the club’s publicity chairper-son. “Exhibitors often use dogmatches to help prepare for thebigger shows where points areawarded. And people new toshowing use matches to learnwhat is expected of them whenthey are in the show ring.”While preregistration is pre-ferred, the club is accepting reg-istrations the day of the match.“People are welcome to bringtheir well behaved dogs to thisevent,” said Politi.There will be a professionalphotographer, vendors, educa-tional programs and demon-strations — to include agility — at the event. Rescue groupswill be available with dogs foradoption, as well as with infor-mation about the different res-cue organizations. In addition,veterinarians will be on handto micro-chip dogs and answerquestions.“We’re going to have an oppor-tunity for people to learn aboutdifferent dog breeds through‘Meet the Breeds’ where someof our members will have dogsavailable for people to see andask questions,” Politi said.“This has been very popularand it’s a wonderful way tosee what breeds make the bestfit for different families andsituations.”For event vendor information,call 456-1033.For general information, call458-7839.
MELISSA MARSHALL • HERALD/REVIEW
This file photo shows Cooper, aYorkie, wearing his sunglasses dur-ing a Going to the Dogs event heldin 2010.
ABOUT THE CLUB
 The Greater SierraVista Kennel Club servesSoutheastern Arizona andCochise County. Membersare devoted to advancingthe sport of purebred dogs,along with promotingresponsible dog ownership. The organization holdseducational programs,supports the Cochise CountyHumane Society’s rescueefforts and services andoffers an annual scholarshipto a Cochise County highschool graduate committedto pursuing a career inanimal health. GSVCK hostsan American Kennel Clubmatch every year in SierraVista.In addition to the match,GSVKC hosts an annual AKCshow every November aspart of the Coyote Classic,a huge four-day event in Tucson. Held in conjunctionwith the Tucson Kennel Club,the event is located at thePima County Fairgrounds off Houghton Road and attractsprofessional dog handlersand exhibitors from all overthe country.GSVKC will be holdingits next general meetingon March 20 at 7 p.m. atthe Windemere Hotel andConference Center, in theBuffalo Soldier Room. Forinformation, call.458-7839 orgo to the website at www.gsvk.org.
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