Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Thayer Efforts to Ensure Maritime Security in East Asia

Thayer Efforts to Ensure Maritime Security in East Asia

Ratings: (0)|Views: 96|Likes:
Published by Carlyle Alan Thayer
This paper considers five major challenges to maritime security in East Asia and how they are being managed by the states involved. Next the paper explores how well the region's security architecture has addressed challenges and threats to maritime security.
This paper considers five major challenges to maritime security in East Asia and how they are being managed by the states involved. Next the paper explores how well the region's security architecture has addressed challenges and threats to maritime security.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Carlyle Alan Thayer on Mar 20, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/20/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Efforts
 
of 
 
Ensure
 
Maritime
 
Security
 
Carlyle
 
 A.
 
Thayer
 
Presentation to2
nd
Tokyo Defense Forum SeminarOrganized by the Ministry of DefenseTokyo, JapanMarch 16, 2012
 
2
Efforts
 
to
 
Ensure
 
Maritime
 
Security
 
Carlyle
 
A.
 
Thayer
*
 
Threats
 
and 
 
Challenges
 
to
 
Maritime
 
Security 
 
There
 
is
 
no
 
legal
 
definition
 
of 
 
maritime
 
security.
 
Maritime
 
security
 
has
 
been
 
defined
 
broadly
 
by
 
scholars
 
and
 
government
 
officials
 
to
 
include
 
any
 
and
 
all
 
of 
 
the
 
following:
 
protection
 
of 
 
sovereignty
 
and
 
territorial
 
integrity
 
in
 
the
 
maritime
 
domain;
 
security
 
of 
 
shipping
 
and
 
seafarers;
 
protection
 
of 
 
facilities
 
related
 
to
 
maritime
 
affairs;
 
port
 
security;
 
resource
 
security;
 
environmental
 
security;
 
protection
 
against
 
piracy
 
and
 
armed
 
crimes
 
at
 
sea;
 
protection
 
of 
 
fisheries;
 
safety
 
and
 
freedom
 
of 
 
navigation
 
and
 
over
 
flight;
 
regulation
 
of 
 
maritime
 
affairs;
 
and
 
maintenance
 
of 
 
law
 
and
 
good
 
order
 
at
 
sea.
 
The
 
central
 
argument
 
of 
 
this
 
paper
 
is
 
that
 
efforts
 
to
 
ensure
 
maritime
 
security
 
require
 
both
 
recourse
 
to
 
international
 
law,
 
including
 
the
 
United
 
Nations
 
Convention
 
on
 
Law
 
of 
 
the
 
Sea
 
(UNCLOS),
 
and
 
political
 
negotiations
 
among
 
the
 
major
 
states
 
concerned.
 
Maritime
 
security
 
can
 
only
 
be
 
secured
 
by
 
careful
 
navigation
 
between
 
legal
 
regimes
 
and
 
realpolitik 
.
 
If 
 
the
 
current
 
status
 
quo
 
remains
 
the
 
implications
 
are
 
clear:
 
maritime
 
incidents
 
could
 
erupt
 
at
 
any
 
time
 
and
 
undermine
 
not
 
only
 
the
 
bilateral
 
relations
 
of 
 
the
 
states
 
concerned
 
but
 
regional
 
security
 
as
 
well.
 
If 
 
current
 
maritime
 
differences
 
are
 
not
 
addressed
 
they
 
could
 
become
 
a
 
major
 
driver
 
in
 
strategic
 
relations
 
rather
 
a
 
problem
 
to
 
be
 
managed
 
by
 
mutual
 
consent.
1
 
Legal
 
regimes,
 
such
 
as
 
UNCLOS,
 
are
 
necessary
 
but
 
not
 
sufficient
 
foundation
 
for
 
maritime
 
security.
 
This
 
is
 
because
 
UNCLOS
 
fails
 
to
 
define
 
key
 
terms
 
used
 
in
 
the
 
debate
 
between
 
maritime
 
powers
 
such
 
as
 
China
 
and
 
the
 
United
 
States.
 
UNCLOS
 
itself 
 
may
 
have
 
been
 
overtaken
 
by
 
advances
 
in
 
technology
 
 –
 
both
 
civil
 
and
 
military.
 
In
 
addition,
 
China
 
and
 
many
 
other
 
nations
 
have
 
adopted
 
laws
 
to
 
regulate
 
foreign
 
military
 
activities
 
in
 
their
 
EEZs
 
that
 
are
 
not
 
supported
 
by
 
international
 
law
 
including
 
UNCLOS.
 
Finally,
 
the
 
United
 
States,
 
although
 
a
 
signatory
 
to
 
UNCLOS,
 
has
 
not
 
yet
 
acceded
 
to
 
the
 
Convention.
 
It
 
is
 
highly
 
unlikely
 
the
 
US
 
Senate
 
will
 
ratify
 
UNCLOS
 
for
 
domestic
 
political
 
reasons
 
and
 
this
 
possibility
 
is
 
likely
 
reinforced
 
by
 
Chinese
 
unilateral
 
interpretations
 
of 
 
the
 
Convention.
 
The
 
paper
 
focuses
 
mainly
 
on
 
Southeast
 
Asia.
 
It
 
identifies
 
four
 
major
 
threats
 
and
 
challenges
 
to
 
maritime
 
security:
 
1.
 
Unsafe
 
actions
 
against
 
military
 
vessels
 
in
 
EEZs
 
and
 
international
 
waters
 
*Emeritus
 
Professor,
 
The
 
University
 
of 
 
New
 
South
 
Wales
 
at
 
the
 
Australian
 
Defence
 
Force
 
Academy,
 
Canberra.
 
E
mail:
 
c.thayer@adfa.edu.au
 
1
 
For
 
a
 
considered
 
set
 
of 
 
cooperative
 
proposals
 
see:
 
Clive
 
Schofield,
 
Ian
 
Townsend
Gault,
 
Hasjim
 
Djalal,
 
Ian
 
Storey,
 
Meredith
 
Miller,
 
and
 
Tim
 
Cook,
 
From
 
Disputed 
 
Waters
 
to
 
Seas
 
of 
 
Opportunity:
 
Overcoming
 
Barriers
 
to
 
Maritime
 
Cooperation
 
in
 
East 
 
and 
 
Southeast 
 
 Asia
,
 
NBR
 
Special
 
Report
 
No.
 
30
 
(Seattle:
 
The
 
National
 
Bureau
 
of 
 
Asian
 
Research,
 
July
 
2011).
 
 
3
2.
 
Disruption
 
of 
 
commercial
 
activities
 
3.
 
Harsh
 
treatment
 
of 
 
fishermen
 
4.
 
Piracy
 
5.
 
Regional
 
Force
 
Modernisation
 
Unsafe
 
actions
 
against 
 
military 
 
vessels
 
in
 
EEZs
 
and 
 
international 
 
waters
 
The
 
United
 
States
 
is
 
the
 
world’s
 
leading
 
naval
 
power.
 
Naval
 
power
 
requires
 
the
 
high
 
seas
 
for
 
maneuver
 
to
 
bring
 
this
 
force
 
to
 
bear
 
on
 
critical
 
security
 
situations.
2
 
During
 
the
 
negotiation
 
process
 
that
 
led
 
to
 
UNCLOS
 
the
 
US
 
was
 
adamant
 
in
 
defence
 
of 
 
customary
 
freedom
 
of 
 
the
 
seas.
 
As
 
a
 
matter
 
of 
 
both
 
international
 
law
 
and
 
realpolitik 
 
the
 
United
 
States
 
opposes
 
all
 
attempts
 
by
 
coastal
 
states
 
to
 
limit
 
access
 
to
 
their
 
EEZs
 
by
 
military
 
ships
 
and
 
aircraft.
 
China,
 
on
 
the
 
other
 
hand,
 
is
 
a
 
continental
 
power
 
that
 
is
 
gradually
 
emerging
 
as
 
a
 
maritime
 
power.
3
 
China
 
seeks
 
to
 
contest
 
US
 
naval
 
dominance
 
in
 
the
 
Western
 
Pacific
 
by
 
expanding
 
its
 
naval
 
reach
 
from
 
the
 
first
 
to
 
second
 
chains
 
of 
 
islands
 
off 
 
its
 
eastern
 
coast.
 
China
 
has
 
adopted
 
“legal
 
warfare”
 
as
 
part
 
of 
 
its
 
military
 
doctrine
 
and
 
utilizes
 
both
 
domestic
 
legislation
 
and
 
its
 
interpretation
 
of 
 
international
 
law
 
to
 
restrict
 
as
 
much
 
as
 
possible
 
US
 
military
 
activities
 
in
 
its
 
EEZ.
 
Given
 
that
 
both
 
the
 
United
 
States
 
and
 
China
 
are
 
also
 
nuclear
 
powers
 
with
 
vital
 
national
 
security
 
interests
 
at
 
stake
 
it
 
is
 
improbable
 
that
 
any
 
legal
 
regime
 
could
 
be
 
adopted
 
that
 
would
 
satisfy
 
both
 
states.
4
 
In
 
these
 
circumstances
 
a
 
political
 
agreement
 
based
 
on
 
realpolitik 
 
is
 
the
 
most
 
likely
 
solution.
 
Both
 
countries
 
need
 
to
 
address
 
the
 
management
 
of 
 
maritime
 
incidents
 
that
 
regularly
 
occur
 
between
 
their
 
navies.
 
In
 
order
 
to
 
do
 
so
 
this
 
matter
 
needs
 
to
 
be
 
addressed
 
at
 
the
 
highest
 
political
 
level
 
such
 
as
 
the
 
China
United
 
States
 
Strategic
 
and
 
Economic
 
Dialogue
 
and
 
its
 
associated
 
Defense
 
Consultative
 
Talks
 
and
 
the
 
China
United
 
States
 
Consultations
 
on
 
Asia
 
Pacific
 
Affairs.
 
Once
 
political
 
agreement
 
is
 
reached
 
maritime
 
security
 
issues
 
should
 
be
 
turned
 
over
 
to
 
officials
 
at
 
their
 
bilateral
 
meeting
 
under
 
the
 
1998
 
Military
 
Maritime
 
Consultative
 
Agreement.
 
2
 
See
 
Peter
 
Dutton,
 
“Introduction,”
 
in
 
Peter
 
Dutton,
 
ed.,
 
Military 
 
 Activities
 
in
 
the
 
EEZ:
 
 A
 
U.S.
China
 
Dialogue
 
on
 
Security 
 
and 
 
International 
 
Law 
 
in
 
the
 
Maritime
 
Commons
 
(Newport,
 
RI:
 
China
 
Maritime
 
Studies
 
Institute,
 
U.S.
 
Naval
 
War
 
College,
 
2010),
 
9
13.
 
3
 
Peng
 
Guangqian,
 
“China’s
 
Maritime
 
Rights
 
and
 
Interests,”
 
in
 
Peter
 
Dutton,
 
ed.,
 
Military 
 
 Activities
 
in
 
the
 
EEZ:
 
 A
 
U.S.
China
 
Dialogue
 
on
 
Security 
 
and 
 
International 
 
Law 
 
in
 
the
 
Maritime
 
Commons
 
(Newport,
 
RI:
 
China
 
Maritime
 
Studies
 
Institute,
 
U.S.
 
Naval
 
War
 
College,
 
2010),
 
15
22.
 
4
 
Alan
 
M.
 
Wachman,
 
“Playing
 
by
 
or
 
Playing
 
with
 
he
 
Rules
 
of 
 
UNCLOS?,”
 
in
 
Peter
 
Dutton,
 
ed.,
 
Military 
 
 Activities
 
in
 
the
 
EEZ:
 
 A
 
U.S.
China
 
Dialogue
 
on
 
Security 
 
and 
 
International 
 
Law 
 
in
 
the
 
Maritime
 
Commons
 
(Newport,
 
RI:
 
China
 
Maritime
 
Studies
 
Institute,
 
U.S.
 
Naval
 
War
 
College,
 
2010),
 
107
119
 
and
 
Sam
 
Batemen,
 
“Solving
 
the
 
‘Wicked
 
Problems’
 
of 
 
Maritime
 
Security:
 
Are
 
Regional
 
Forums
 
up
 
to
 
the
 
Task?,”
 
Contemporary 
 
Southeast 
 
 Asia
,
 
33(1),
 
2011,
 
1
28.
 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->