Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Pistoleer by James Carlos Blake

The Pistoleer by James Carlos Blake

Ratings: (0)|Views: 61|Likes:
Published by MysteriousPress
The Pistoleer by James Carlos Blake

Click the image above to zoom in

A stunning snapshot of the life of one of Texas’s most notorious outlaws

For his forty-two years on this earth, John Wesley Hardin’s name was synonymous with outlaw. A killer at fifteen, in the next few years he became skilled enough with his pistols to back down Wild Bill Hickok in the street. By the time the law caught up with Hardin when he was twenty-five, he had killed as many as forty men and been shot so many times that, it was said, he carried a pound of lead in his flesh. In jail he became a scholar, studying law books until he won himself freedom, and afterwards he tried to lead an upright life. It was not to be.

By the time he was killed in 1895, Hardin was an anachronism—the last true gunfighter of the Old West. In this volume, western master James Carlos Blake retells Hardin’s life, exposing the many different sides of the man who became a legend.
The Pistoleer by James Carlos Blake

Click the image above to zoom in

A stunning snapshot of the life of one of Texas’s most notorious outlaws

For his forty-two years on this earth, John Wesley Hardin’s name was synonymous with outlaw. A killer at fifteen, in the next few years he became skilled enough with his pistols to back down Wild Bill Hickok in the street. By the time the law caught up with Hardin when he was twenty-five, he had killed as many as forty men and been shot so many times that, it was said, he carried a pound of lead in his flesh. In jail he became a scholar, studying law books until he won himself freedom, and afterwards he tried to lead an upright life. It was not to be.

By the time he was killed in 1895, Hardin was an anachronism—the last true gunfighter of the Old West. In this volume, western master James Carlos Blake retells Hardin’s life, exposing the many different sides of the man who became a legend.

More info:

Published by: MysteriousPress on Mar 20, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/29/2013

pdf

text

original

 
THE PISTOLEER:A NOVEL OF JOHN WESLEY HARDIN
James Carlos Blake
A MysteriousPress.comOpen Road Integrated Media eBook - Judge Clabe Holshousen -
I believe my sister Anne made an excellent choice in Barnett Hardin fromthe flock of suitors who so ardently courted her. He was an industrious and widelyrespected man of temperate personal habits, and his Long Tom Creek plantationconsistently produced handsomely profitable harvests in cotton and sugarcane. Ivery much enjoyed his company, and, over time, I fell in the habit of attendingWednesday supper and Sunday dinner at his home. We were often joined at one or another of these family repasts by his nephew, young John Wesley Hardin, of whom both my sister and Barnett were quite fond.John was a tall, lean lad whose aspect suggested speed and a ready grace.But his most striking feature was his eyes. They were bright with intelligence andwit, fully attentive and yet seemingly alert to the smallest movement in the room.Interestingly, their color wavered between blue and gray, and their hue twixt dark and light. He was well schooled and properly mannered, and he had an excellent propensity for recounting humorous anecdotes about his hunting adventures and
 
sporting endeavors. His narratives were marked by an intense animation andmuch dramatic gesture, and unfailingly inspired us to appreciative laughter.And yet, despite his charm and good humor, I must admit that I detected inhim an inclination to recklessness. There was an aura of a cocked pistol abouthim, a readiness to action without forethought. Thus, when he came to me andtold me he had shot a man, I was distraught, of course, and saddened—but notaltogether surprised.On the morning in question, I was taking my second cup of chickory when Iheard a horse galloping up to the front of the house, then a loud calling of myname. I went immediately to the door and there found young John in a highlyagitated state. Before I could say a word, he plunged into a torrential narrative soutterly confusing that I was compelled to insist that he come into the house, sitdown and catch his breath, then proceed in more measured fashion.And thus he did. I learned that he had come to me directly from a violentconfrontation with a man named Mage, a Negro who had once been among myholdings. I remembered the troublesome rascal well enough. John told me he’dhad an altercation with Mage in the cane fields the day before. The Negro hadthreatened to kill him, and in consequence Barnett had fired Mage off his land.But then just this morning, as John had been riding toward home on the Sumpter Road, he came upon Mage at the bend in the road where the creek abuts a cotton

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->