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brand-e Campaigns Panel: crowdsourcing the content

brand-e Campaigns Panel: crowdsourcing the content

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Published by Crowdsourcing.org

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Published by: Crowdsourcing.org on Mar 22, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/03/2013

 
brand-e Campaigns Panel: crowdsourcingthe content
March 22nd, 2012 by admin
Car campaigns are generally all horsepower and tight mountain bends, but
Subaru‟s foray into vehicle narrative with
 – 
users can go online,recreate their first-ever car, tell a storyabout, and get it turned into an animated video and push it out oversocial media
 – 
last month found a different gear, and drove right into thebrand-e Campaigns Panel.
“Automotive clients often go for the
big and shiny and this is such a
refreshing change,” says Lawrence Weber of the Brooklyn Brothers.“The insight around your first car being the one that sparks the fondest
memories is spot on, and the homemade feel of the illustration gives thisa lot of w
armth. It‟s impressive from a production point of view too.”
 However, while Jackson Collins of PHD New York finds the ideaengaging and true to brand, he also thinks price of entry for thisexperience may be too steep for those who may not feel comfortablehaving a brand accessing their Facebook details.
“To them, such requests from Subaru can appear inconsistent with thefriendly, „Ben & Jerry‟s Ice Cream on wheels‟ image that Subaru hasspent so much time and effort carefully crafting,” he says.
 
 
“Market r 
esearchers are often accused of sitting on the fence
 – 
 
so I‟mreverting to type judging the Subaru campaign,” says Sabine Stork of Thinktank International. “I‟m in two minds about the creative
idea/campaign mechanic of turning consumer words stories into videos
 – 
 on the one hand it is very clever and appealing for active participants
 – 
 but looking at the final executions I was bored.
“There is a fad for crowdsourced storytelling at the moment and we‟ve
researched some of these campaigns with consumers and were struck by
 people‟s inability to turn their experiences into real narratives and by themundanity of what they chose to share … unfortunately both of thesewere evidenced by the rather dull videos I sampled off the Subaru site.”
 Crowdsourcing was also at the heart of 
 – 
Stork found it a great fit with the
 brand‟s mix of aspiration and accessibility.
 
“As any devoted Grazia reader knows the magazine already has some
crowdsourced elements
 – 
 
notably the „Fashion Jury‟ which invitesreaders, alongside professionals to judge celebrity outfits. Plus there‟s a
regular doublespread on street style. In all, there is a sense of a fashion-informed glamorous Grazia community both consuming and feeding
into the magazine which this campaign dovetails beautifully.”
 
“It‟s an astute move from an editorial point of view,” says
Weber.
“There are so many voices clamouring for attention around LondonFashion week that it‟s hard to stand out. By giving readers the chance to
help create the magazine, Grazia is providing a broader point of view,importantly, still with their authorit
ative voice.”
 

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