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Rice cultivation at Mayapur in West Bengal

Rice cultivation at Mayapur in West Bengal

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West Bengal in India must be the most organised state in India for rice cultivation. The workers take pride in their job and passionately execute their duties, as is evidenced here. Watching them execute their duty is an inspiration for one who grew up on rice culture along coastal Guyana...WE WERE NEVER AS ENTHUSIASTIC AS THEY ARE!!!! However, the Indian indentured labourers awaiting transportation to Trinidad, Suriname and British Guyana from Calcutta were exposed to this environment and learned these skills which they took with them to their new home. Being assiduous, and eager to escape the new form of slavery, they ensured that their crops never failed. Such skills were passed down through the generations. The photographer recalls that in June 1972, the day before his GCE Pure Mathematics A'level Paper 1, he was in the rice field at Plantation Kentire, with his father, broadcasting jarai (partially germinated rice seeds). Today he is a mining engineer, but rice cultivation remains embedded in his genes. Scenes such as this stir up latent, and now dormant, passion in him. As this image was being recorded, the photographer was in the company of 55 others from Kerala. The onlookers could not decipher the enthusiasm, eagerness and fervour the photographer exhibited. He later explained to them that he grew up under such conditions along coastal Guyana, helping his grand parents and his parents regularly in the paddy fields of the Canje District in Berbice county, carrying out identical chores....THEY WERE FINALLY APPEASED!!!! It is hoped that one day, NGOs will copy this efficient method of farming and replicate it in Africa to enhance food production there. PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE: This image enforces the need for patience. The photographer had to wait until all of the workers were in the identical posture before making the exposure. A fairly slow shutter speed shows the blurring of the nearest worker's right hand, conveying a feeling of work being done.

West Bengal in India must be the most organised state in India for rice cultivation. The workers take pride in their job and passionately execute their duties, as is evidenced here. Watching them execute their duty is an inspiration for one who grew up on rice culture along coastal Guyana...WE WERE NEVER AS ENTHUSIASTIC AS THEY ARE!!!! However, the Indian indentured labourers awaiting transportation to Trinidad, Suriname and British Guyana from Calcutta were exposed to this environment and learned these skills which they took with them to their new home. Being assiduous, and eager to escape the new form of slavery, they ensured that their crops never failed. Such skills were passed down through the generations. The photographer recalls that in June 1972, the day before his GCE Pure Mathematics A'level Paper 1, he was in the rice field at Plantation Kentire, with his father, broadcasting jarai (partially germinated rice seeds). Today he is a mining engineer, but rice cultivation remains embedded in his genes. Scenes such as this stir up latent, and now dormant, passion in him. As this image was being recorded, the photographer was in the company of 55 others from Kerala. The onlookers could not decipher the enthusiasm, eagerness and fervour the photographer exhibited. He later explained to them that he grew up under such conditions along coastal Guyana, helping his grand parents and his parents regularly in the paddy fields of the Canje District in Berbice county, carrying out identical chores....THEY WERE FINALLY APPEASED!!!! It is hoped that one day, NGOs will copy this efficient method of farming and replicate it in Africa to enhance food production there. PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE: This image enforces the need for patience. The photographer had to wait until all of the workers were in the identical posture before making the exposure. A fairly slow shutter speed shows the blurring of the nearest worker's right hand, conveying a feeling of work being done.

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Published by: Ramoutar (Ken) Seecharran on Mar 24, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/20/2014

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