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CCTP664 the Failure of Shaming

CCTP664 the Failure of Shaming

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Published by Corey McKeon

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Published by: Corey McKeon on Mar 25, 2012
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03/25/2012

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F
AILURE
 
OF
S
HAMING
F
AILURE
 
OF
S
HAMING
US R
 EFUSAL
 
TO
A
 BOLISH 
D
 EATH 
 ENALTY 
COREY MCKEON (
cwm34
)Georgetown UniversityCommunication, Culture & TechnologyGlobal Governance & DeliberationGeorgetown UniversityProfessor J.P. SinghDecember 19, 2010
 Failure of Shaming 
1
 
INTRODUCTION
After a country is publicly shamed it deliberates domestically and makes aconscious decision to either cave in and alter its position or firmly refuse to change. Thecontents of this essay will delve into when and why shaming a country fails in globalgovernance. This is not to say that shaming is never a successful outcome, there areinstances when shaming does succeed and the reciprocal instance is that which this essayexamines.I will argue that through two conditions, shaming will fail; domestic politics andself-comparison. By looking at these two conditions we will see that for an issue involvinghuman rights, even the act of shaming does not always have the capability of instantlychanging the responsiveness of a country. By looking at an example of when shaming fails,we can better understand where domestic politics and self-comparison play into theequation.In early November of 2010, the United Nations Human Rights Council met inGeneva to examine the human rights efforts of the United States through the microscope of the UN and other nations. Recommendations were made to change how the US enforcesthe death penalty, the US did nothing in response to these recommendations from 228nations. Through this case we will focus in on an instance where the death penalty, beingenforced by the US, disrupted other countries by violating a deviants rights to consult their home country before penalizing this person to death, in the case of Murphy versus Netherland. Through this case we will see how domestic politics surrounding the issue of the death penalty cannot be effected by global interference, yet through the narrower caseof Murphy versus Netherland we will see where the death penalty fails to be a domestic
 Failure of Shaming 
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 political issue when multinational involvement is ignored. We will also look at the self-comparison of a country through this case, when compensation of human rights efforts issatisfied through other philanthropic contributions.Literature from a variety of authors can be integrated into this argument to supportmy claim for shaming to fail within the international arena. By pulling in scholarly work from James Lebovic & Erik Voeten, Ole Jacob Sending & Iver Neumann, Emilie Hafner-Burton, Alastair Ian Johnston and Bruce Bueno de Mesquita we can examine similaritieson the distinctions involving human rights and the interactions that take place in globaldeliberations. This paper will show that through heavily internalized domestic politics andnarrow self-comparison a country will fail to be shamed in global governance.
THE CONCEPT OF SHAMING
Shaming, being the main problem within this essay, can have many outcomes.Many conditions – which will be later discussed – have influence over the outcome of thisdeliberative strategy. Within an international social environment shaming is not blatantlymanifested, through later media portrayals, political documents, and residual interactions,shaming can manifest.Although Lebovic and Voeten through
 
their work 
The Politics of Shame: TheCondemnation of Country Human Rights Practices in the UNCHR
may not agree with thefinal outcome of my paper, being the failure of shaming, they do make many valid andtransferable statements apparent and relevant to my argument. Through a case involvingthe UNCHR, Lebovic and Voeten analyze the actions of this international institution andthe actions it took to publicly name and shame countries it felt were not aligned with its
 Failure of Shaming 
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