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Meditation & Imaginative Knowledge

Meditation & Imaginative Knowledge

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Although it is easily understood that imagination is the natural ability to perceive imagery within the mind, it is rarely apparent exactly how subtle forms of imagination guide every step of our lives. A direct relationship exists between the quality of one’s mind and the quality of the imagination that proceeds from it, and this in turn dictates the condition of our lives.
Although it is easily understood that imagination is the natural ability to perceive imagery within the mind, it is rarely apparent exactly how subtle forms of imagination guide every step of our lives. A direct relationship exists between the quality of one’s mind and the quality of the imagination that proceeds from it, and this in turn dictates the condition of our lives.

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Published by: The Gnosis of Kali Yuga on Dec 05, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial No-derivs

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11/01/2012

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MMeeddiittaattiioonn && IImmaaggiinnaattiivveeKKnnoowwlleeddggee 
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 Although it is easily understood that imagination isthe natural ability to perceive imagery within the mind,it is rarely apparent exactly how subtle forms of imagination guide every step of our lives. A directrelationship exists between the quality of one’s mindand the quality of the imagination that proceeds from it,and this in turn dictates the condition of our lives.Before we can understand imagination however, wehave to understand what is firstly required to seeanything at all. Obviously, without light there is only darkness. Yet even with a source of illumination,something more than light is required in order toactually see something. First of course is a seer, andsecond, something to be seen. So there are exactly threerequirements that must coincide for arrival of that which is called “sight:” an emanation of light, an objectof reflection, and lastly, a subject to receive the result. We can see this, for example, when a lamp emits light, which subsequently reflects off the desk it rests uponand into the eyes of the seer. What is interesting to contemplate is that, prior toreflecting, the light is impossible to be seen. Even if lighttravels directly into the eye, it is only seen because itmakes contact with the retina. Outer space, therefore,does not appear dark due to an inherent lack of light,but rather of a lack of things to be enlightened. In thismanner is how we must begin understand that conceptof “Uncreated Light,” the Absolute Abstract Space, thekabbalistic “Ain,” or primordial chaos that exists, yet, atthe same time does not exist. Light that travels unabatedis there, yet, without something to reflect upon, there isno true light because there is nothing to see.Our inner space is much the same as outer space. With this in hand, what does it mean to reflect uponone’s self? What is introspection, insight, and what doesit mean to be a visionary? All of this has to do withimagination. In religion, whenever light is mentioned, itrelates to the root of existence, to the spirit, or to asupreme and undifferentiated reality. Light in thespiritual sense is the root of reality and existence.Therefore, we can refine our understanding of imagination as being the conscious reflection of thisspiritual light upon the lens of the mind.Imagination is that which moves us, inspires us, andorientates us upon the journey of existence. A proper,cognizant and sparkling imagination is the looking glass
 
upon which we can discover the answers to that series of problems called “life.” How unfortunate it is then, thatthis natural – yet usually undeveloped – faculty of themind is confused with its lesser and troublesome twinnamed fantasy.Imagination and fantasy are the opposite poles thesame thing. True imagination is conscious, direct, pureand undistorted light. Fantasy, fettered by the debris of memory and distorted by the self-willed desires of the“I,” is unconscious, mechanical, illusory and delusional.Fantasy is the playmate of ignorance: an unconscious orconscious choice to ignore the truth. Imagination, onthe other hand, is the vision of prophets and root of trueindividualized knowledge. When imagination isrealized, happiness is the consequence, yet when fantasy is lived, suffering is the outcome.Normally, when we close our eyes we see nothingbut darkness because this is our state of mind.Unconsciousness or darkness reigns over ourphilosophical earth. Yet, when the luminescence of afantastic idea appears, we can see it through ourimagination, and this insight or “inner-sight” gives usthe inspiration to act upon it, and when our inspirationis crossed with our willpower to act, we transform thatimage into a denser reality. This is why true imaginationis objective, for it is real upon its own level, and if we wish, we can make it real to our sensory organs by bringing it into physical reality.Imagination is the source of the greatestadvancements in science, art, religion and philosophy. An engineer or scientist is just as inert as the artist orpoet who lacks imagination. If one cannot first see theproblem to solve, it is obviously because imagination isinactive, and what separates the visionary from thevagabond is the latter’s inability to manipulate the toolof imagination like an artist’s brush. This is why Einstein correctly stated that “imagination is moreimportant than knowledge.” I would rather say thatimagination is the true source of knowledge. It is thistrue knowledge, or gnosis, that forms our unshakableand unbreakable foundation of life that we must base allour actions upon. When Buddha closed his eyes, reality stared back athim, and as a liaison he reported his insights to those who were unable to see for themselves. Likewise the wisdom of any prophet can said to be related with“vision,” and this is why wisdom and vision originatefrom the same roots. As the saying goes, however, “every stick has two ends:” our states of sleep, dreaming, andfantasy are woven from the same fabric of imagination,

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