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Social Business Q1 2012- Quarterly magazine of the Social Media Leadership Forum

Social Business Q1 2012- Quarterly magazine of the Social Media Leadership Forum

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Published by It's Open
In this Issue: Asda | Hiscox | npower | Social Emterprise | Pepsico | Regulation
In this Issue: Asda | Hiscox | npower | Social Emterprise | Pepsico | Regulation

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Published by: It's Open on Mar 26, 2012
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BUSINESS
SOCIAL
Produced by It’s Open
|
Tel: 0845 054 2299
|
www.itsopen.co.uk 
The Social Media Leadership Forumis managed by It’s Open
Quarterly magazine of the Social Media Leadership Forum
WINDS OF CHANGE AT MET OFFICE
In this issue:
 ASDA’S SOCIAL APPROACHHISCOX’S LEAP YEARWHY FOLLOW NPOWER?THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISEPEPSICOCAMPAIGNS
   Q   1    2   0   1   2
www.SocialMediaLeadershipForum.org
|
@SocialMediaLF
 
        W        E        L        C        O        M        E
W
elcome to the second edition of SocialBusiness, a quarterly magazine that
looks at the rapidly developing eld
of social media. As before, this issueprovides snapshots of the ways businessesembrace social networks as a means to makegenuine relationships with customers.
Hiscox shows what can be achieved bygetting involved in the entertainment world. Theinsurance rm commissioned a web TV comedyseries called
Leap Year 
, which enabled it to buildfrom scratch an audience of 40,000 active socialmedia followers in the US. (If you have a spareten minutes, watch the rst episode on YouTube – you’ll enjoy it!).Experience suggests that a careful approach tosocial media works best. In this issue we talk toAsda, which stresses the importance of having asmaller number of engaged followers than largenumbers, and accordingly has allowed its presenceon Twitter and Facebook to grow organically.The Met Ofce spent a year watching howother businesses use social media before jumpingin itself. Its efforts have helped to strengthen thealready high levels of trust it enjoys with the Britishpublic – a crucial asset for a weather forecaster.We hear from npower how it set up a publiconline forum to handle consumers queries, at atime of major upheaval in the energy markets.We also learn from PepsicoUK about the rolesocial media has played in marketing campaignsfor its Tropicana and Walkers brands. And Dr.Andrew Currah records some of the top-linethoughts contained in his recent report on thesocial enterprise, examining the phenomenon of the ‘social customer’.We hope you nd the magazine useful andlook forward to seeing you at future SocialMedia Leadership Forum events.
 
IF IT’SNOTBROKEN ...
The ght againstregulation
   I  n    F  o  c  u  s
 ASDA’SSOCIAL APPROACH
Grow your socialcustomers organically
   S  t  r  a  t  e  g  y
LEAP YEARSUCCESS FORHISCOX 
   I  n  n  o  v  a  t   i  o  n
WINDS OFCHANGE
Strengthening an alreadystrong reputation at theMet Ofce
   C  o  v  e  r    S  t  o  r  y
WHY WOULD ANYONEWANT TO FOLLOW ANENERGY COMPANY?
npower explains all
   I  n  t  e  r  v   i  e  w
THESOCIALENTERPRISE
Thriving on opennessand collaboration
   R  e  s  e  a  r  c   h
3468101214
SOCIALLYINTEGRATED
It’s Open talks toPepsi about integratedcampaign management
   I  n  t  e  r  v   i  e  w
 Y 
our thoughts, feedback and socialmedia experiences are very welcome
Please contact us with anyenquiries and we will get back to youas soon as possible.
Editor
Robert McLuhanrob.mcluhan@itsopen.co.uk 
Community Manager
Fran Bodley-Scottfran.scott@itsopen.co.uk 
Designer & Production Manager
Ian Headian.head@itsopen.co.uk 
Cover Art
Cozy Tomato
BUSINESS
SOCIAL
Produced byIts Open
|
Tel:0845 054 2299
|
www.itsopen.co.uk 
Quarterly magazine of the Social Media Leadership Forum
WINDS OF CHANGE AT MET OFFICE
In this issue:
 ASDA’S SOCIAL APPROACHHISCOX’S LEAP YEARWHY FOLLOW NPOWER?THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISEPEPSICOCAMPAIGNS
   Q   1    2   0   1   2
www.SocialMediaLeadershipForum.org
|
@SocialMediaLF
 
Internet freedomsare under threatas never before.Governmentseverywhere arestriving to controlonline activity, eggedon by traditionalbusinesses andindustries. An outcry in the US led to draftlaws against online piracy being put onhold earlier this year. But another similarinitiative, the Anti-Counterfeiting TradeAgreement (ACTA), has been makinggreater headway, having been quietly ratiedby the US and a number of other countries,and is causing consternation among internetusers in Europe especially.As social media commentator Jeff Jarvisnotes, many things bother would-be regulators:‘piracy, privacy, pornography, predators,indecency, and security, not to mentioncensorship, tyranny, and civilization.’ But fromanother viewpoint nothing much has changedin the past ten years. The internet is working just the way it did then, and the sky hasn’tfallen in. So why the rush to x it now?It’s true that technological advancesbring anxieties aplenty. However withhindsight these are often seen to havebeen overblown. Take social networkingsites: when MySpace took off a few yearsago, fears were aired of the potentialthreat it posed to young people fromsexual predators. In the US that quicklyled to calls that access to such sites bebanned in schools and libraries, and thatage verication be compulsory. In factsubsequent research showed that theconcerns were seriously overstated.And who now remembers the outcryagainst Google’s Gmail service in 2004, inwhich targeted advertising is based on users’interests? The fear of mail being read byGoogle led to attempts to ban such targeting.However, when it was understood that it wasalgorithmic processes that were ‘reading’ theemail, not actual humans, the panic subsided,and the service is now happily used by 350million people worldwide.Digital commentator Adam Thierernotes a ‘precautionary principle’ at work here. It holds that, since every technologycould pose some theoretical danger or risk,public policies should tightly control thoseinnovations until their developers can provethat they won’t cause any harms. In otherwords, the law should always ‘play it safe’. Butthis poses a serious threat to technologicalprogress and human prosperity, he argues.A regime guided at every turn by thisprecautionary principle would make digitalinnovation and progress impossible.For his part Jarvis advocates resistance.The reason why governments and somebusinesses want to ‘throttle’ the internetis because they see it as a threat to theirpower, he claims, and if ordinary citizens don’twant to lose its benets they will have toght back. If its enemies prevail, the digitalconnectivity we take for granted today couldeventually be a fond but distant memory.
n
P
oliticians love to regulate, and with something as big anduntrammelled as the internet intheir sights they have plenty to work with. But the internet is working
 just ne, and they should leave it alone,
argue digital media commentators.
IF IT’SNOTBROKEN…
The fight againstregulation
   I  n    F  o  c  u  s
Produced by It’s Open
|
Tel: 0845 054 2299
|
www.itsopen.co.uk 
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