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The Assessment of the Energy Metabolism in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Serum Fluorescence Emission

The Assessment of the Energy Metabolism in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Serum Fluorescence Emission

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Context • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating fatigue illness that has unknown etiology and lacks an objective diagnostic marker.
Objective • To examine the metabolic component of CFS to determine if practitioners can use serum NAD(P)H concentration measurements to monitor metabolism and fatigue status in patients with CFS.
Design • The research team conducted a case-control study, comparing a group of patients who were diagnosed with CFS with a control group of healthy subjects. The team obtained venous blood samples from fasting patients to examine the serum NAD(P)H concentrations.
Setting • The study occurred at the Riordan Clinic in Witchita, Kansas.
Participants • The study included 44 CFS patients at the Riordan Clinic and 30 healthy control participants. The CFS patients presented a spectrum of symptoms that had existed for at least 6 months: new, unexplained, persistent, or relapsing chronic fatigue that bed rest did not resolve and that was severe enough to reduce daily activity significantly—by 50%—in conjunction with headache, muscle pain, pain in multiple joints, and unrefreshing sleep. In the control group, the research team enrolled subjects without diagnosis of disease or injury.
Outcome Measures • The research team determined levels of serum reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NADH and NAD[P]H) by measuring serum fluorescence emission at 450 nm. The team then conducted sensitivity and specificity analyses.
Results • NAD(P)H concentrations in serum of CFS participants averaged 8.0 ± 1.4 (standard deviation [SD]) nmol/mL, while those in the healthy controls averaged 10.8 ± 0.8 (SD) nmol/mL, a statistically significant difference. Using a cut-off concentration of 9.5 nmol/mL, the research team attained a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 1.0. An analysis of receiver-operator characteristics yielded an area under the curve of 0.9. The research team compared serum NAD(P)H to several endocrine and metabolic lab parameters. Serum NAD(P)H was directly correlated with serum CoQ10 levels and inversely correlated with urine hydroxyhemopyrrolin-2-one levels.
Conclusions • Based on these findings, the research team proposed using serum NAD(P)H, measured as an intrinsic serum-fluorescence emission, to monitor metabolism and fatigue status in patients with CFS. Following patients’ NAD(P)H levels over time may aid in selecting therapeutic strategies and monitoring treatment outcomes. (Altern Ther Health Med. 2012;18(1):36-40.)
Context • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating fatigue illness that has unknown etiology and lacks an objective diagnostic marker.
Objective • To examine the metabolic component of CFS to determine if practitioners can use serum NAD(P)H concentration measurements to monitor metabolism and fatigue status in patients with CFS.
Design • The research team conducted a case-control study, comparing a group of patients who were diagnosed with CFS with a control group of healthy subjects. The team obtained venous blood samples from fasting patients to examine the serum NAD(P)H concentrations.
Setting • The study occurred at the Riordan Clinic in Witchita, Kansas.
Participants • The study included 44 CFS patients at the Riordan Clinic and 30 healthy control participants. The CFS patients presented a spectrum of symptoms that had existed for at least 6 months: new, unexplained, persistent, or relapsing chronic fatigue that bed rest did not resolve and that was severe enough to reduce daily activity significantly—by 50%—in conjunction with headache, muscle pain, pain in multiple joints, and unrefreshing sleep. In the control group, the research team enrolled subjects without diagnosis of disease or injury.
Outcome Measures • The research team determined levels of serum reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NADH and NAD[P]H) by measuring serum fluorescence emission at 450 nm. The team then conducted sensitivity and specificity analyses.
Results • NAD(P)H concentrations in serum of CFS participants averaged 8.0 ± 1.4 (standard deviation [SD]) nmol/mL, while those in the healthy controls averaged 10.8 ± 0.8 (SD) nmol/mL, a statistically significant difference. Using a cut-off concentration of 9.5 nmol/mL, the research team attained a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 1.0. An analysis of receiver-operator characteristics yielded an area under the curve of 0.9. The research team compared serum NAD(P)H to several endocrine and metabolic lab parameters. Serum NAD(P)H was directly correlated with serum CoQ10 levels and inversely correlated with urine hydroxyhemopyrrolin-2-one levels.
Conclusions • Based on these findings, the research team proposed using serum NAD(P)H, measured as an intrinsic serum-fluorescence emission, to monitor metabolism and fatigue status in patients with CFS. Following patients’ NAD(P)H levels over time may aid in selecting therapeutic strategies and monitoring treatment outcomes. (Altern Ther Health Med. 2012;18(1):36-40.)

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Published by: InnoVision Health Media on Mar 27, 2012
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Thomas Hennessy Jr added this note
Please send this to Dr. Sanjay GUPTA at CNN.Com and ask him to feature this on a story about M.E. /FMS/GWS/MCSS and chronic LYME for May 12th, international AWARENESS day's 20th anniversary this year. May 12th is Florence nightingale's birthday. she was the founder of modern nursing from her bed! she inspired the founding of the International RED CROSS. She suffered from bartonella infection, ONE
Thomas Hennessy Jr added this note
crosses the blood brain barrier and strips the gears of the HPA axis, and leaves the autonomic nervous system off balance. i say that we need to think of your GP as a watch maker. the brain is the most complex watch ever created. there is often ONE tooth stripped off each gear. thus the watch will NEVER tell correct time again. we NEVER get restorative sleep. thus, viruses and bacteria proliferate
Thomas Hennessy Jr added this note
Please also write me at rescindinc@gmail.com and see our old website at www.rescindinc.org. We have claimed at international meetings, twice on CNN's Larry King Live, and on the PBS show, the NEWS HOUR, that these are all "CIND" disorders. chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases. Like you, we have claimed that SOME TOXIC INSULT, be it a virus, bacteria, or chemical toxin, crossed the blood
Thomas Hennessy Jr added this note
Hey folks, you might be on to something! if you believe that your tests can stand up to peer review and attacks from the mental midgets at the NIH, CDC and HHS, then PLease, and i mean PLEASE send a copy to Dr. Sanjay Gupta, practicing Neurosurgeon and top doctor at CNN. I have been BEDBOUND 22 hours a day, for 24 years, on fentanyl pain patches for 18 years, up to 6 each every 72 hours. I am the

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