Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Like Gold Refined

Like Gold Refined

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,100 |Likes:
An excerpt from Like Gold Refined by Janette Oke published by Bethany House Publishers

Her Character Has Been Shaped and Tempered by Both Adversity and Triumph...

If Virginia could have chosen to accept or discard all the changes that came her way, she gladly would have let most of them pass right by herself and her family. She loved her life--living on the farm with her beloved Jonathan and their children, not far from her parents and her grandparents. But a change that is tearing at her heart is the gradual but steady physical decline in Grandma Marty and Grandpa Clark. She cannot imagine their familiar farm home without their welcoming smiles and their words of wisdom that arise from of decades of life experiences and a solid faith in God.

And their lovely daughter Mindy, who has blessed their home ever since her mother left the tiny child with them, has been encouraged and guided to pray for that mother all these years. Was God answering that prayer, or was the worst nightmare any family could face now upon them?
An excerpt from Like Gold Refined by Janette Oke published by Bethany House Publishers

Her Character Has Been Shaped and Tempered by Both Adversity and Triumph...

If Virginia could have chosen to accept or discard all the changes that came her way, she gladly would have let most of them pass right by herself and her family. She loved her life--living on the farm with her beloved Jonathan and their children, not far from her parents and her grandparents. But a change that is tearing at her heart is the gradual but steady physical decline in Grandma Marty and Grandpa Clark. She cannot imagine their familiar farm home without their welcoming smiles and their words of wisdom that arise from of decades of life experiences and a solid faith in God.

And their lovely daughter Mindy, who has blessed their home ever since her mother left the tiny child with them, has been encouraged and guided to pray for that mother all these years. Was God answering that prayer, or was the worst nightmare any family could face now upon them?

More info:

Published by: Bethany House Publishers on Mar 27, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/04/2013

pdf

text

original

 
9
e
     e
       e
e
C h a P t e r 
1
 A 
thankul sigh gently eased rom Virginia’s lips as she
lited her head or another glimpse o brightness outside the
kitchen window. At long last a small beam o sunshine waspushing its way through the clouds that had blanketed theheavens or the past three days. It was good to see the sun
again. “Thank you, Lord,” she whispered, hardly realizing she
did so. Maybe now the ground would have a chance to dry,
and the children, who had become impatient and ussy, would
once again be able to play in the armyard. The gloomy weather
and conned circumstances were hard enough or Virginia to
deal with on her own without also trying to entertain three
housebound youngsters. Another anemic ray managed to nd its way through theovercast and to light the tip o a cloud directly above. Virginiaelt her shoulders lit. The Lewis amily would not be acing asecond food ater all. But even as she gloried in that act, shereminded hersel that it would be some time, even with bright
sunshine, until the yard dried enough to allow the children
out. But even as she was concluding that thought, she elt herskirt tugged.“Mama!” Four‑year‑old Martha didn’t even try to temperher excitement. “We can go out now.”
 
10
e
 
 Janette Oke
Virginia’s eyes again shited to the window. “Not yet,” shecautioned, moving with diculty rom the cupboards to thestove with persistent Martha in tow.“But you said . . .” whined Martha.“I said we had to wait or sunshine.”“But it is shining. See.”“It’s not . . .”“It is. Look.”
 At Martha’s insistence, Virginia glanced over her shoulder.
“It’s not
 fully
shining,” she said.“But it’s
trying 
,” argued Martha. “It’s a little bit shining.See.” She pointed again toward the window.
Virginia hal turned rom stirring her pot. No one was more
anxious than she to have the children out rom underoot. But
it would be oolish to send them out to swollen puddles andeverything dripping rom the recent rains.
“I meant the sun had to warm the world again. To dry
things,” she inormed her impatient daughter.“You didn’t say that. You said—”“I know what I said,” replied Virginia, trying to keep rus‑tration rom edging her voice. “You’d come in soaking wet i  you went out now.”We’d dry.”Virginia nodded.
Yes
, she thought,
 you’d dry
. Was it worthit? It was tempting. . . .“Mindy gets to go out.”“Mindy has to go to school.”“Why can’t I go to school?”
“We’ve been through that beore, Martha. You’ll go to
school when you’re old enough.”
“Go school,” echoed a little voice rom behind Virginia.
Two‑year‑old Olivia had joined her older sister. Virginia turned
to the child. O the three children to whom she had given birth,Olivia was most like her ather. Virginia couldn’t help but smile
and shake her head at Olivia, who stood with a rag doll drag‑ging rom one pudgy hand, a curl o brown hair hanging over
 
11
 Like Gold Rened
 
E
one eye, the permanent mischievous grin on her round babyace. She studied her mother with direct, candid eyes, readyto back her big sister Martha in any argument that might getthem both out o the house.
“No,” said Virginia, her voice sotening as she knelt to hug
them both. “Neither o you is going o to school.”
Olivia swung her attention back to Martha. Were theyto throw a tantrum, cajole urther, or let things pass and go
back to playing?But Martha was not ready to give up. “I bet Murphy hasbeen lonesome.”“Murphy is doing just ne.” Virginia rose to her eet andtasted the stew or seasoning. It was ne, she decided as shepushed the pot to the back o the stove. It would be ready or
supper when the men came in rom a long day o working with
the horses. But she had to make the biscuits and the pudding
or dessert. The clock on the wall alerted her that the baby
 would soon be waking rom his nap and Mindy would soonbe home rom school.
“Why don’t you play with the blocks Papa made you?”
she encouraged her two daughters.“We already did,” muttered Martha.
“Then play with the dolly house rom Grandpa and
Grandma.”“We did that, too.”“Would you like—”“I want to go outside. That’s what I’d like.”Olivia nodded in vigorous agreement.
“I understand,” said Virginia as she moved to get out a
bowl and ingredients or making the pudding. “But we don’talways get what we want.”
“I know that,” replied Martha with an impatient swingo her arm. “But why can’t we get what we want . . . some‑
times?”“You do. Sometimes.”“Why can’t we
this
time?”

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->