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Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Ratings: (0)|Views: 201|Likes:
Published by uwogazette
www.westerngazette.ca • @uwogazette

Sleep is overrated
A new study shows sleeping pills have harmful long-term effects >> pg. 5

thegazette
learning the ropes since 1906 Wednesday, March 28, 2012

today high 16 low 3

tomorrow high 8 low 1
VoluMe 105, issue 92

canada’s only daily student newspaper • founded 1906

Library forum pits books against students
taylor rodrigues Gazette staff If you can never find a study space on campus, you’re not alone. Western libraries are holding two forums on M
www.westerngazette.ca • @uwogazette

Sleep is overrated
A new study shows sleeping pills have harmful long-term effects >> pg. 5

thegazette
learning the ropes since 1906 Wednesday, March 28, 2012

today high 16 low 3

tomorrow high 8 low 1
VoluMe 105, issue 92

canada’s only daily student newspaper • founded 1906

Library forum pits books against students
taylor rodrigues Gazette staff If you can never find a study space on campus, you’re not alone. Western libraries are holding two forums on M

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Published by: uwogazette on Mar 28, 2012
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Wednesday, March 28, 2012
canada’s only daily student newspaper • founded 1906
VoluMe 105, issue 92
the
gazette
www.westerngazette.ca • @uwogazette
lg    1906
today high
16
l 
3
tomorrow high
8
l 
1
Sleep isoverrated
A new study showssleeping pills haveharmful long-termeffects
>> pg. 5
Lib fu pis bks gins suens
tl rigues
Gazette sta
I you can never nd a study spaceon campus, you’re not alone. Western libraries are holding two orums on March 29 or un-dergraduate students to voice theirstudy space needs.“A common problem that I hearrom students is the lack o study space on campus. This problem be-comes more obvious when examsand midterms are occurring,” War-ren Cracknell, undergraduate sci-ence student senator, said.He argued it is important to in-vest in our libraries to ensure thatstudents’ needs are met.“The problem isn’t necessarily space, but suitable space. There areindeed many places to study, espe-cially during the warmer weather.However, many places are in Inter-net dead zones, have no electricaloutlets, or are located in very busy areas with high trac and noiselevels,” Jared Fedora, a second-yearpolitical science student, said.Fedora said he and many o his peers have diculties nding a suitable study place on campus,especially during the aternoonsand early evenings.Cracknell explained short-termand long-term solutions are neces-sary to address this issue.“The university is working ona more short-term solution interms o moving more volumesinto storage to make way or addi-tional study space,” Cracknell said.“[However], the student senatorsbelieve that a long-term solutionneeds to be made to address theseproblems.”Cracknell would like to see anew learning commons, similar tothe one announced by King’s Col-lege, on main campus. A learning commons combines study spaces with elements o a library, and o-ers greater fexibility than a tradi-tional library.“We have already done quitea bit o re-purposing work at Tay-lor Library,” Kim Cornell, assis-tant librarian, said. “We do wantto ensure that we’re addressing theneeds or our undergraduate andgraduate students.”She explained many areas havealready been re-purposed to createmore study spaces, and Western li-braries are considering re-purpos-ing more. She added most areas re-purposed previously held shelveso print journals that the university has an electronic or digital copy o. It is more dicult to put booksand monographs into storage be-cause even old and inrequently used ones may be relevant to someprograms.Cornell acknowledged the li-braries have opportunities to bet-ter serve the needs o undergradu-ate students, graduate studentsand aculty.She said there is a shortage o electrical outlets in Taylor becausethe library’s biggest part is an addi-tion that is about 20 years old.“Obviously, they couldn’t haveanticipated laptops at that pointin time and that need or power,”Cornell said. “We really don’t havea acility or rooms that are amena-ble to [group] needs.”“[We’re] sort o exploring whatcollaborative learning needs [stu-dents] have when they are working in groups,” Cornell added.
The forums will be held Thurs-day from 12-1:30 p.m. and from5:30-7 p.m. in the Taylor Library Kellogg Room. Western libraries in-vite all undergraduate students toattend. Pizza will be served.
Bg v  bk  
Chel Sne
neWs eatures editor
Ontario students will keep theirtuition grants and see some smallcuts, but that’s about it. Yesterday, the Ontario Govern-ment presented their budget to theLegislative Assembly. The budget, which maintains the 30-per-cent-o-tuition grant given to studentsin January, will be voted on in thecoming days.Critics o the budget say itdoesn’t do enough to help someo the ongoing issues acing universities.“Ontario’s edge in the globaleconomy is our highly skilled andeducated workorce,” Dwight Dun-can, Ontario nance minister, ex-plained to the assembly.Earlier in the day, Sam Andrey,executive director o the OntarioUndergraduate Student Alliance,explained there were several otherconcerns the lobby group hadbeen pushing, including mentalhealth, online learning and teach-ing quality.“There remains more work tobe done, particularly on improving the quality o the learning environ-ment,” Sean Madden, president o OUSA, explained in a press releaseater the budget was announced.“With this budget, our universi-ties will continue to operate withthe least per-student unding andhighest tuition ees o any prov-ince, while teaching quality andstudent success remain pressing issues,” Madden said. “While post-secondary education has beenspared rom more harmul cuts, weeel like this was a missed opportu-nity to begin investing in these im-portant issues.”Madden also noted severalsmaller grant programs had beencancelled so the province couldbalance its books. Programs that were no longer receiving publicunding include the Ontario Work Study Program and the OntarioSpecial Bursary.“Ontario must eliminate thedecit to strengthen the ounda-tion o the economy,” Duncansaid.Madden also noted several in-rastructure problems on cam-puses were put on hold.Graeme Stewart, communica-tions and government relationsmanager or the Ontario Coned-eration o University Faculty Asso-ciations, noted many universities were already putting o inrastruc-ture projects because o a lack o unding.OCUFA wanted to see a long-term unding strategy imple-mented or universities.“One o the things we’re trying to get at is a longer term, predict-able plan or increasing unding tomake sure it’s going to do what weneed it to do,” Stewart explained.The budget is being debated inthe Ontario House o Commonstoday.
M   i  ,v   -,    v b  wg   v.
—J 
-   ,    b  
Ritchie Sham
Gazette
  V is i t  us  i n  U C C
 e ver y  Wedne sda y un t i l Apr i l  25
 
2 •
 
the
gazette
• wddy, Mh 28, 2012
Crossword By Eugene sheffe
The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands or another. I you thinkthat X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and wordsusing an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error.© 2002 by Kings Features Syndicate, Inc.
Cugh n Ce
Jason Oncz
Gazette
faaaaaaaan-tastic.
 
i w K d   uv cmm c , w   b ’  ,   m.
Nes Biefs
Sich ff fEh Hu
Cities and homes around the world will go dark on Saturday night at8 p.m. or the sixth annual EarthHour. The environmental cam-paign encourages participants tostop using electricity or one houreach year, to push people to think more about how much energy they consume.The annual campaign, whichbegan in Sydney, Australia in 2007, was started by the World WildlieFund and has since grown into aglobal phenomenon. According tothe Earth Hour website, “In 2011,Earth Hour saw hundreds o mil-lions o people across 135 coun-tries switch o.”“[Earth Hour] encourages any-one and everyone to power downor an hour—turn lights o, turnthe computer o, turn the TV o,or at least conserve as much energy as you can at a given moment—asa symbol, I suppose, o wanting toeliminate mass energy consump-tion,” Marissa Jore, vice-presidentcampus issues or the University Students’ Council, explained.Jore explained the USC serviceEnviroWestern is participating by encouraging the approximately 6,000 students living in residenceto power down. “They don’t actu-ally turn any o the power o inresidence, but they do have a airly large inormational campaign inevery residence happening aroundthe 8 p.m. mark, encouraging peo-ple to turn the lights o in theirroom,” she said.Because Earth Hour occurson the weekend, the USC’s EarthHour activities will be conned tothe residences. However, that isn’tstopping the university rom mak-ing an eort, Beverly Ayeni, en-ergy and environment manager at Western, explained.“We’re going to do some big shut downs and just try to do a big push to get employees and stu-dents to turn o lights and thatsort o thing,” she said, explaining air handling units in all buildingson campus will be shut down orthe hour.
—Julian Uzielli
the ci fexilppuniies
London has been named the thbest place to cheat in Canada. Ac-cording to data rom AshleyMadi-son.com, a Toronto-based dating site aimed at providing servicesto married people who want tohave an aair, London is the city  with the the th most philander-ers per capita. Ottawa is the rst,ollowed by Saskatoon, Calgary and Edmonton.In the last month alone, the sitehas been visited by 320,420 Cana-dian men and 143,200 Canadian women. The site has 13 millionmembers in 22 countries, with themajority in the United States.Noel Biderman, ounder o Ash-leyMadison.com, also stated thatLondon has the oldest users among those cities. The average age ormen rom London is 48, while theaverage age or women is 40.“Many people have an aairbecause they are in sexless mar-riages, but they do not wish to enda marriage based on one small as-pect. They may have children or -nancial obligations, and the aairallows them to be satised in allaspects o their lives while their re-lationship stays intact,” Bidermansaid. When asked i he thought the website damaged amilies, Bider-man said he thought it did theopposite.“Many people using Ashley-Madison.com are actually attempt-ing to save their marriage. They areunullled in one aspect, but know that a marriage is more than thesum o its parts,” he said.
—Anthony Poon
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the
gazette
• wddy, Mh 28, 2012
 
• 3
 wenes  uel:Quebec uiin incese
 an Zlzn
neWs editor
Post-secondary students acrossQuebec are marching out o classesall across the province to protest aplanned 75 per cent jump in tu-ition over the next ve years. Whilethe ury on display may be moti-vated by the sticker shock o a 75per cent increase, the protestorsare wrong in thinking the tuitionhike is unjustied.The rst, and perhaps most ob-vious reason, is that Quebec tuitionrates are already the lowest in thecountry. At McGill, the average stu-dent rom Quebec pays $2,167.80per year, which is roughly 40.4 percent o the average student ees inthe rest o Canada. Even with theproposed increase, in ve yearsQuebec tuition rates will still be$3,792.80, or roughly $1,500 lessthan the national average. While supporters o the protestmay argue that the national tuitionrates are too high, the reality is thatthe government still heavily subsi-dizes university, and it’s contribut-ing to government debt. Quebecpost-secondary education tuitionrates have been rozen or over 15 years, which has resulted in an ed-ucational system that places 80 percent o the nancial burden on tax payers and has let Quebec univer-sities $500 million in debt.The students protesting may rame this as an issue o accessibil-ity, but even that has to be adjustedor reality. I post-secondary educa-tion is a right, which I would argueis an unortunate result o decadeso over-selling such a product, itdoesn’t have to be ree, just rea-sonable and equally accessible. I these protests are an expression o such principles, why are the stu-dents not arguing or bracketed tu-ition rates?Ignoring a cumulative 42 percent interest increase alone is arecipe or disaster, and the Que-bec government is taking steps tocurb the damage. Even in Ontario, which has the highest tuition ratesin Canada, the Ontario Under-graduate Student Alliance is will-ing to accept infationary increaseso roughly three per cent per year.Students have gotten too used tothe low tuition ees in Quebec,and need to deal with the reality o solving the problems these rateshave caused.
 alex Cn
neWs editor
One o the biggest problems withpost-secondary education in On-tario is accessibility. With an aver-age cost o $5,388 to $6,640 overthe past our years, our provincehas the highest tuition rates in thecountry. That’s why the OntarioUndergraduate Student Associa-tion spends so much time ght-ing to help those rom nancially disadvantaged backgrounds break in to the post-secondary system.Quebec’s colleges and universi-ties, on the other hand, lie on thecomplete opposite end o thespectrum. Quebec currently pos-sesses what has been described asa unique accessibility level, wherenearly everyone can aord a post-secondary education—so long asthey’re a Quebec native.This is what a success lookslike, people. Many o the acces-sibility problems we ace here inOntario are literally non-existentor Quebecers. Why, then, is taking this system o the table an optionthat was even considered, let aloneimplemented.The problem here isn’t that Que-bec tuition is too low—it’s that tu-ition throughout most o the otherprovinces is too high. Post-second-ary education has eectively be-come a pre-requisite or success-ul employment at this point, andthis is a reality the Quebec pro-vincial government needs to deal with. Yes, both McGill and Quebecitsel are massively in debt, but Ican’t accept that heaping an addi-tional nancial burden on the dis-advantaged is the best answer. Noram I the only person who thinksthis—these tuition increases havenot been accepted as a critical ne-cessity. The Parti Quebecois haspromised to immediately cancelthe hikes should they be elected inthe upcoming provincial election.I won’t go so ar as to say Quebecshould implement another 10 yeartuition reeze. The Quebec rateshaven’t been adjusted or infationin a decade, and a more moder-ate increase is probably called or.More importantly, it also wouldn’tdraw tens o thousands o studentsinto the streets o Montreal.
Zl fhe Eh
t    v
C’s Bich
t  j
Ci cuncil p inceseises eebs
 Vici mccli
Gazette sta
The City o London is presenting members with a 3.1 per cent pay raise on April 10. The 3.1 per centincrease is guaranteed or non-elected city sta, but has raised thequestion o whether city council-lors, who currently work part-time,should hold their positions ulltime.Stephen Orser, councillor or Ward 4, addressed the issues withcontinuing as a part-time council.“We’re a ull-time city with ull-time problems and the voters havesaid twice that they want a ull-time council,” he said.City council has not had a raisein pay since 2008, and there is con-cern about how it plans to maintainits tax reeze while giving council-lors a raise. While some councillors hold jobs outside their position on thecouncil, Orser said this is not prac-tical. “You can’t ride two horses,”he said. “Since the last pay raise years ago, my responsibilities andobligations have denitely in-creased, and as a part-time workeron a ull-time council, I don’t eeladequately compensated.”Denise Brown, councillor or Ward 11, expressed doubt aboutthe council’s position on their cur-rent salary.“We work 40 hours or more per week on city meetings and othercity issues. However, I knew therate o pay when I was elected,and it is my opinion that councilshould not be voting on its ownremuneration,” she said. “I wouldrather us vote in 2014 or the nextcouncil term.”Brown argued money is not adeal-breaker or her dedication.“In general, yes, I eel the pay isadequate. I am very proud to serveLondoners, and we all have the op-portunity o working elsewhere,part time or ull time.”Harold Usher, councillor or Ward 12, also agreed the issue isabout more than just a raise.“We do it because we love toserve the community, but thisdoesn’t mean we will do it or ree,”Usher said. “It is only air that thepeople who work or the commu-nity are compensated adequately.”Orser also addressed the con-cern about continuing the tax reeze while giving city sta a raise,saying this money is already in thebudget and would come rom city savings.Brown compared this amount tothat o the budget. “The money weare speaking o is less than $20,000.This is a very small amount o theoverall budget.”
 uwogazette.ca/news
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