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Towards Policies for Climate Change Mitigation: Incentives and benefits for smallholder farmers

Towards Policies for Climate Change Mitigation: Incentives and benefits for smallholder farmers

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Published by David Burns
The potential to sequester carbon in soils, enhance aboveground biomass and reduce non-carbon dioxide emissions creates an opportunity for the agricultural sector to benefit from mitigation finance. Smallholders can tap into this opportunity provided that adoption barriers can be successfully addressed.

This report is structured as follows: Section 1 provides an overview of the main international climate finance mechanisms and sources. Section 2 describes some of the main barriers to the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices by smallholders. Section 3 describes what policies and instruments can be used to increase smallholder access to finance and investment. Section 4 investigates how climate finance can support the policies identified in the previous section to foster the implementation of sustainable agricultural practices by smallholders who could potentially benefit from climate finance. The conclusion of this report is that climate finance can be used as an instrument to overcome barriers to smallholders' adoption of sustainable agricultural practices by accessing new funds, designing new disbursement mechanisms, and forging new partnerships.
The potential to sequester carbon in soils, enhance aboveground biomass and reduce non-carbon dioxide emissions creates an opportunity for the agricultural sector to benefit from mitigation finance. Smallholders can tap into this opportunity provided that adoption barriers can be successfully addressed.

This report is structured as follows: Section 1 provides an overview of the main international climate finance mechanisms and sources. Section 2 describes some of the main barriers to the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices by smallholders. Section 3 describes what policies and instruments can be used to increase smallholder access to finance and investment. Section 4 investigates how climate finance can support the policies identified in the previous section to foster the implementation of sustainable agricultural practices by smallholders who could potentially benefit from climate finance. The conclusion of this report is that climate finance can be used as an instrument to overcome barriers to smallholders' adoption of sustainable agricultural practices by accessing new funds, designing new disbursement mechanisms, and forging new partnerships.

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Published by: David Burns on Mar 29, 2012
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CCAFS Report No. 7
Towards Policies for ClimateChange Mitigation: Incentives andbenefits for smallholder farmers
Charlotte Streck, with contributions fromDavid Burns and Leticia Guimaraes
 
CCAFS Report No. 7
Corresponding Author AcknowledgementsDisclaimerCorrect citationContact informationFront cover photo
Charlotte StreckClimate Focus North America Inc.1025 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 1102Washington, DC 20036, USA Email: c.streck@climatefocus.comThis report benefited greatly from comments received fromand conversations held with an extensive group ofpractitioners, policy makers and experts. Special thanks goto Hasan Bolka, Alejandro Calvache, Maria Elfi ChavesSalamanca, Nora Ferm, Robert Gilbertson, TanjaHavemann, Lina Heron, Donna Lee, Mark Moroge, IlviaPatricia Niño, Christina Seeberg Elverfeldt, Seth Shames,Timm Tennigkeit and Lini Wollenberg.The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) is a strategicpartnership of the Consortium of International AgriculturalResearch Centers (CGIAR) and the Earth System SciencePartnership (ESSP). The program is supported by theEuropean Union,the United States Agency for InternationalDevelopment (USAID), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs andTrade, the Danish International Development Agency(Danida), the UK Department for International Development(DFID), Irish Aid, and Instituto de Investigação CientíficaTropical, Portugal (IICT) with technical support from theInternational Fund for Agricultural Development(IFAD).This Report is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution– NonCommercial–NoDerivs 3.0 UnportedLicense.This publication may be freely quoted and reproducedprovided the source is acknowledged. No use of thispublication may be made for resale or other commercialpurposes.© 2011 CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).ISSN1904-9005
Creative Commons License
Streck C, Burns D, and Guimaraes L. 2012. Incentives andbenefits for climate change mitigation for smallholderfarmersCCAFS Report no. 7. CGIAR Research Program onClimate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).Copenhagen, Denmark. Available online at:www.ccafs.cgiar.orgCCAFS Coordinating UnitFaculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen,Rolighedsvej 21, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.Email: ccafs@cgiar.org · Online: www.ccafs.cgiar.orgPic by Neil Palmer (CIAT). Himachal Pradesh, India. Fullcaptions to follow shortly. For more information, contactn.palmer@cgiar.orgThe views expressed in this report are those of the authorsand not of the CGIAR, the ESSP or their funders. Thisreport has been peer-reviewed.
Towards Policies for Climate Change Mitigation: Incentives and benefits for smallholder farmers
 
3
List of TablesContents
Executive summary 51. Introduction 72. International climate finance options 8
2.1. Overview of climate finance 82.2. Delivery mechanisms 9
3. Policies to support smallholder investments in sustainable agriculturalactivities124. Harnessing climate finance for the benefit of smallholders16
4.1. Institutions164.2. Policies and financial incentives174.3. Measurement, reporting and verification21
5. Conclusion23References24 Annex I: Agricultural NAMA submissions27 Annex II: Policy incentives to harness investments in smallholder farmingsystems291. Establishing results-based incentives29
1.1. Payments for environmental services291.2. Carbon markets29
2. Facilitating access to finance303. Reducing or redistributing risk304. Incentives for external (foreign and domestic) private investment32
4.1. Publicprivate partnerships324.2. Supply chain interventions334.3. Labelling and certification34
Table 1.
Project-based carbon market mechanisms 9
Table 2.
Comparing REDD+ and NAMA10
Table 3.
Barriers to the adoption of improved agricultural practices amongsmallholders12
Table 4.
Potential financial instruments to support smallholder sustainableagricultural practices13
Table 5.
Mitigation activities and financing mechanisms18
Table 6.
Types of PES schemes19
Table 7.
Illustrative MRV regimes for proposed NAMAs21
Table 8.
Climate finance opportunities benefiting smallholders23
Table 9.
Agricultural NAMA submissions to the UNFCCC (February 2011)27
Table 10.
Cases studies: climate risk mitigation instruments 31
CCAFS Report No. 7
Towards Policies for Climate Change Mitigation: Incentives and benefits for smallholder farmers

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