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The Light of Life

The Light of Life

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Published by Daniel Drumm
Christianity teaches of Love and the Holy Spirit, but has lost its understanding of the relation between Knowledge and the Light. This relation exists if Jesus is the Logos as John claimed, a term coming from Greek philosophy. Modern churches teach faith and belief, but no longer see God as the Truth, that is, as “the true Light which enlightens everyone coming into the world” (Jn 1:4,9) Thus only emotion and blind belief are left to make a connection to the Divine. Yet the New Testament teaches that the Spirit enables you to know all things, even the deep things of God. (1 Cor 2: 9-16). Understanding is a conversation with Light, with That which illuminates all knowing. Insight is based upon the Spirit according to John’s statement that the Light will teach you of all things (if you ask and seek) and that you need no other to tell you what is true because the Light itself is truth (1 Jn 2:27 KJV). That is also taught in Hebrews Chapter 8 where the relation of your heart and mind to God’s Light is considered to be the New Covenant itself.

It is as if Christianity over the ages has gradually suppressed its thinking by its feeling side. Love is taught but not what Light is. Yet God is Light and Love according to John’s epistle (1 Jn 1:5; 1 Jn 4:7-8,16) Inquiry is feared, or tethered to literal interpretation, or to carnal reasoning from accepted doctrine. The spiritual desire to know is undermined by a demand for unquestioning belief. God is taught as inscrutable, not as knowable; and God’s Presence is not seen as illumination by him, but as an emotional relation to a thought about him- especially as a feeling of dependency upon him.

Many Christians believe that Spirit is emotion, or is only accessed by emotion. They mistake the ancient meaning for soul or psyche, which is feeling-and-desire, imagination and emotion, for spirit. The spirit is the life of what we call knowing -the flow mentally of light- the literal breath (pneuma) of the mind. Mind is spirit’s lowest manifestation and expression just as the form of the body is the soul’s. The soul’s function is to turn the things of light into forms, and, to release the light bound in forms. The spirit’s function is to know and be the identity in all things. The soul’s center is the Good, as the spirit’s center is the True. These are the Divine Male and Female, or Adam and Eve of creation: thought and feeling; idea and will; image and likeness.

Connection to the Logos was considered to be through Self-knowledge, reason and the mind of man long before John taught that Jesus was Its incarnation. Self-knowledge was taught by the Stoics, Heraclitus, Socrates, and by the Mysteries. John and Paul would have known this when they communicated that Jesus was the Logos to their Gentile audiences using the Greek philosophical idea and term. In Greek and Stoic Philosophy Logos meant Reason, the acting Ideas, Order, or Intelligence of God. John identified the Logos as the Light of Life, claiming that Reason, as the ancient world translated this term, or Sophia as the Hebrews called God’s Wisdom, enlightens every person.

For all who seek God through understanding, meditation or prayerful insight, the following is intended to supplement teachings about Love and the Holy Spirit with a teaching for the mind about Light and the Logos. It seeks to re-establish the point of view of the New Covenant concerning Love, Light and Life. It distinguishes those views (Jn 6:63; Heb 10:16; 2 Cor 3:3) from the tribal, fearful and law-based teachings of the Old Covenant (Heb 7:11-16; Gal 4:24-29; Heb 8:6-11) which Paul claims place a veil upon the heart (2 Cor 3: 6-18). Rather than ‘waxing old and decaying’ (Heb 8:13) these ancient forms of early monotheism have steadily encroached upon the mind and heart of modern Christianity. According to Paul they should be set aside, as they are not fundamental to Christianity, and only serve to introduce it.

Send questions or comments to Humata@aol.com
Christianity teaches of Love and the Holy Spirit, but has lost its understanding of the relation between Knowledge and the Light. This relation exists if Jesus is the Logos as John claimed, a term coming from Greek philosophy. Modern churches teach faith and belief, but no longer see God as the Truth, that is, as “the true Light which enlightens everyone coming into the world” (Jn 1:4,9) Thus only emotion and blind belief are left to make a connection to the Divine. Yet the New Testament teaches that the Spirit enables you to know all things, even the deep things of God. (1 Cor 2: 9-16). Understanding is a conversation with Light, with That which illuminates all knowing. Insight is based upon the Spirit according to John’s statement that the Light will teach you of all things (if you ask and seek) and that you need no other to tell you what is true because the Light itself is truth (1 Jn 2:27 KJV). That is also taught in Hebrews Chapter 8 where the relation of your heart and mind to God’s Light is considered to be the New Covenant itself.

It is as if Christianity over the ages has gradually suppressed its thinking by its feeling side. Love is taught but not what Light is. Yet God is Light and Love according to John’s epistle (1 Jn 1:5; 1 Jn 4:7-8,16) Inquiry is feared, or tethered to literal interpretation, or to carnal reasoning from accepted doctrine. The spiritual desire to know is undermined by a demand for unquestioning belief. God is taught as inscrutable, not as knowable; and God’s Presence is not seen as illumination by him, but as an emotional relation to a thought about him- especially as a feeling of dependency upon him.

Many Christians believe that Spirit is emotion, or is only accessed by emotion. They mistake the ancient meaning for soul or psyche, which is feeling-and-desire, imagination and emotion, for spirit. The spirit is the life of what we call knowing -the flow mentally of light- the literal breath (pneuma) of the mind. Mind is spirit’s lowest manifestation and expression just as the form of the body is the soul’s. The soul’s function is to turn the things of light into forms, and, to release the light bound in forms. The spirit’s function is to know and be the identity in all things. The soul’s center is the Good, as the spirit’s center is the True. These are the Divine Male and Female, or Adam and Eve of creation: thought and feeling; idea and will; image and likeness.

Connection to the Logos was considered to be through Self-knowledge, reason and the mind of man long before John taught that Jesus was Its incarnation. Self-knowledge was taught by the Stoics, Heraclitus, Socrates, and by the Mysteries. John and Paul would have known this when they communicated that Jesus was the Logos to their Gentile audiences using the Greek philosophical idea and term. In Greek and Stoic Philosophy Logos meant Reason, the acting Ideas, Order, or Intelligence of God. John identified the Logos as the Light of Life, claiming that Reason, as the ancient world translated this term, or Sophia as the Hebrews called God’s Wisdom, enlightens every person.

For all who seek God through understanding, meditation or prayerful insight, the following is intended to supplement teachings about Love and the Holy Spirit with a teaching for the mind about Light and the Logos. It seeks to re-establish the point of view of the New Covenant concerning Love, Light and Life. It distinguishes those views (Jn 6:63; Heb 10:16; 2 Cor 3:3) from the tribal, fearful and law-based teachings of the Old Covenant (Heb 7:11-16; Gal 4:24-29; Heb 8:6-11) which Paul claims place a veil upon the heart (2 Cor 3: 6-18). Rather than ‘waxing old and decaying’ (Heb 8:13) these ancient forms of early monotheism have steadily encroached upon the mind and heart of modern Christianity. According to Paul they should be set aside, as they are not fundamental to Christianity, and only serve to introduce it.

Send questions or comments to Humata@aol.com

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Published by: Daniel Drumm on Dec 08, 2008
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“In him was life, which life was the light of men... That was thetrue Light which enlightens every man who comes into the world.”
John 1: 4, 9
 Moses at the Well of Be'er (Dura)
The
L
ight of 
L
ife
Daniel Drumm
 
   D  a  n   i  e   l   D  r  u  m  m    ©   2   0   0   7
The angels of peace weep bitterly. The roads are ruined,and no one travels the Way. The covenant is made void.
Isaiah 33: 7-8
 Athor’s Not
What the concept of the Logos - theologically translated as the Word - meant in Christ’s day, and the relationGreek philosophy had to Christianity, can be read in a brief selection from the
Cliff Notes to the New Testament 
 before the main text is read. It is included at the start of the appendix. Otherwise it might be felt that the statementsmade in the text about Light and Reason don’t relate to Christianity. It is strange that later centuries have practicallyerased the role that reason (logos) and the mind or understanding (nous) play in connecting man to the Logos. TheLogos was known anciently as Reason, or the acting Ideas, Order, or Intelligence of God. The claim that Jesus wasGod was made primarily because John said in the opening lines of his Gospel that Jesus was the Logos, a conceptfrom Greek philosophy. Other quotes like, “Why do you call me good? There is One who is good and He is God”(Mt 19:17; Mk 10:18; Lk 18:19), coupled with Jesus’ claim that he was not blaspheming when he called himself the Son of God, because
everyone
who is taught by the Spirit is a Son of God (Jn 10: 2-6; Rom 8:14,16; Jn 6:45;Heb 8: 6-1; Psalm 82: 1, 6-7) argue against it. So what the Logos meant in Greek philosophy, and in Philo, calledthe Thirteenth Apostle, whose ideas helped shape early Christian thought, is important to understand.“God is Truth, and his shadow is Light.” Philo, who was familiar with this saying of Plato’s, called the Logosthe shadow of God; and the Apostle John identified the Logos as “the true Light which enlightens everyone com-ing into the world.” The Logos was conceived as “apportioned into an infinite number of parts in humans”
(Philo:Her. 24-26)
, with the reasoning capacity of the human mind being a portion of the all-pervading Divine Logos.The mind itself was a special gift to humans from God and has a divine essence (from Hillar’s notes on Philo in theappendix p.22).In the Various Notes section (p.21) which follows the Cliff Notes In the appendix are statements from differentreligious and noetic traditions that amplify the text, and indicate that other traditions than the Christian are similarlyaware of many things Jesus and the Apostles taught.Following that are the ideas of a Jewish philosopher of Christ’s time, Philo
(20 B.C.-50 A.D.)
, with whom Paul andJohn seem familiar (p.22). His ideas form an extraordinary link between Jewish and Greek thinking, and perhapshelped enable the Apostles to communicate to their varied audiences. If Jesus’ words about manna are accuratelyreported they sound unaccountably like Philo’s. Philo
 
attempted to relate Greek philosophy with Jewish revelationand was influential in early Christian thinking. He was even called the 1th Apostle. The selections on Philo includ-ed in the notes are by Marion Hillar, from the
 Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
.Following the notes in the appendix every Biblical reference cited in the text is included in full (p.24). Theyare arranged in order and in columns so you can flip back and forth to the text. Following that are a few specificBiblical references that concern overcoming death (p.29).
Danil Dr
February 25, 2007
Please send any questions or comments to Humata@aol.com. Include “Light of Life” in the subject header.
Frontispiece: Moses at the Well of Be’er- from Dura (Europas), detail of the wall-painting from the Synagogue at Dura.Columbia University Art Database, http://www.mcah.columbia.edu/cgi-bin/dbcourses/item?skip=140
"
The greatest Church Fathers attest... there is... an ontological link or bond (sungeneia)connecting the human present with the divine future. As Zizioulas, discussing JustinMartyr, summarizes: 'The permanent sungeneia between God and man through themedium of nous leads us to take the idea of logos, employed by Justin in a christologi-cal sense, as the bond between God and the world, between truth and the mind. Christ,as the logos of God, becomes this very link between truth and the mind, and the truth of  philosophy is nothing less than part of this logos."' 
- Edward Moore, STD, PhD

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I have the fragrance of life and I've seen the world I was just trying to figure out what to do with these gifts because I find myself always left empty handed and it hurts. What I'm trying to do is to allow for God to do his will in penticost, how can I reach the world without sinning? I want to get good at being a saint.
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