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Busts and Cameos from A Rainbow of Stitches

Busts and Cameos from A Rainbow of Stitches

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Published by CrafterNews
If you're just catching up with Downton Abbey, don't worry. We also have a free cross-stitch motif reminiscent of Downton Abbey to keep you occupied while you watch the drama unfold. We think these busts and cameo silhouettes from A Rainbow of Stitches look a bit like Lady Cora and the Crawley daughters!
If you're just catching up with Downton Abbey, don't worry. We also have a free cross-stitch motif reminiscent of Downton Abbey to keep you occupied while you watch the drama unfold. We think these busts and cameo silhouettes from A Rainbow of Stitches look a bit like Lady Cora and the Crawley daughters!

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Published by: CrafterNews on Mar 30, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/29/2013

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EmbroidEry and Cross-stitCh basiCsPlus morE than 1000 motifs and 80 ProjECt idEas
StitcheS
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before you begin
Before you start,make sure your fabric is well prepared so it won’t fray as you’re stitching it. You caneither hem the edges with a large basting stitch, or simply apply fusible web strips around the fab-ric’s perimeter. Keep in mind that the piece of fabric should always be larger than the pattern to bestitched.
working with fabric
Fold your fabric in fourto find its center point. Make large basting stitches along both the horizontaland vertical folds to serve as guidelines as you stitch. Align the center point of your motif with thepoint where the two lines of stitching intersect. Remove these guidelines once you’ve finished embroi-dering your motif.To help your stitches stay even,use an embroidery hoop. Gently stretch your fabric on the hoop,making sure to reposition it frequently
 —
or to remove it at the end of each stitching session
 —
to avoiddamaging its weave.
working with embroidery floss
Two to three strands of six-strand cotton flosswere used to stitch all of the projects shown in thisbook. Whenever you start a project, you’ll find it helpful to make a sampler of stitches on the fabricyou’re planning to use to determine how many strands of floss you’ll need. As a general rule, lower-count Aidas—a type of counted thread fabric that’s traditionally used for cross-stitch projects—require more strands, while higher-count Aidas and linens need fewer. For example, most projectsstitched on 14-count Aida require three strands of floss, while those stitched on a 28-count linen,which has a much tighter weave, would probably need just two strands, and even one might look fine.
 
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transferring motifs
To transfer motifs to your fabric,use carbon transfer paper, which is specially made for embroideryand is available in several colors. Choose the one that works best with your fabric. For example, whitetransfer paper is best for dark fabrics, while blue or red work best on lighter ones.Start by photocopying the motif,which you can enlarge or reduce to get it to just the right size. Tracethe photocopied motif on a sheet of tracing paper, following its outline and making sure to include allits details. Prepare your fabric according to the instructions on the previous page, then iron it care-fully before spreading it out on a flat surface, such as an ironing board or clean work table.Place the transfer paper betweenthe fabric and the tracing paper, making sure to put the coloredside of the transfer paper face down. Keep the papers in place by pinning them to the fabric. With ahard pencil or a pen, carefully trace the motif, pressing down so that the entire image transfers prop-erly. Once you’ve finished, separate the papers and fabric carefully to avoid smudging the fabric.
starting and ending off
This method of starting and ending off avoids having to tie knots on the back of your piece. To begin,take about a yard of floss, using as many strands as you need for your project. Fold it in two, thenthread the needle. Bring the needle up through the fabric, leaving the loop created by the foldedfloss at the back. Bring the needle back down to start your first stitch, passing it through the loop,then pull gently to lock in the thread. Once you’re done stitching, slip your thread under your lastthree or four stitches.Before you begin,review the steps on the fol-lowing pages. Even experienced stitchers aresure to find tips and hints to make their workeasier.

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