Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
16Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Eco Fascism / Fascist Ideology : the Green Wing of the Nazi Party and Its Historical Antecedents by Peter Staudenmaier

Eco Fascism / Fascist Ideology : the Green Wing of the Nazi Party and Its Historical Antecedents by Peter Staudenmaier

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,304 |Likes:
Published by t2p22
One of the least recognized or understood of these strains is the phenomenon one might call "actually existing ecofascism," that is, the preoccupation of authentically fascist movements with environmentalist concerns. In order to grasp the peculiar intensity and endurance of this affiliation, we would do well to examine more closely its most notorious historical incarnation, the so-called "green wing" of German National Socialism.
One of the least recognized or understood of these strains is the phenomenon one might call "actually existing ecofascism," that is, the preoccupation of authentically fascist movements with environmentalist concerns. In order to grasp the peculiar intensity and endurance of this affiliation, we would do well to examine more closely its most notorious historical incarnation, the so-called "green wing" of German National Socialism.

More info:

Published by: t2p22 on Dec 09, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/04/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Ecofascism / Fascist Ideology: The Green Wing of the Nazi Party and its Historical Antecedents by Peter Staudenmaier
Fascist Ecology:The "Green Wing" of the Nazi Partyand its Historical Antecedents
Peter Staudenmaier
"We recognize that separating humanity from nature,from the whole of life, leads to humankind
s owndestruction and to the death of nations. Only through are-integration of humanity into the whole of nature canour people be made stronger. That is the fundamentalpoint of the biological tasks of our age. Humankindalone is no longer the focus of thought, but rather life asa whole . . . This striving toward connectedness with thetotality of life, with nature itself, a nature into which weare born, this is the deepest meaning and the trueessence of National Socialist thought."
1
 In our zeal to condemn the status quo, radicals often carelessly tossabout epithets like "fascist" and "ecofascist," thus contributing to asort of conceptual inflation that in no way furthers effective socialcritique. In such a situation, it is easy to overlook the fact that thereare still virulent strains of fascism in our political culture which,however marginal, demand our attention. One of the least recognizedor understood of these strains is the phenomenon one might call"actually existing ecofascism," that is, the preoccupation of authentically fascist movements with environmentalist concerns. Inorder to grasp the peculiar intensity and endurance of this affiliation,we would do well to examine more closely its most notorioushistorical incarnation, the so-called "green wing" of German NationalSocialism.
http://www.spunk.org/texts/places/germany/sp001630/peter.html (1 of 25) [2008-12-09 13:04:54]
 
Ecofascism / Fascist Ideology: The Green Wing of the Nazi Party and its Historical Antecedents by Peter Staudenmaier
Despite an extensive documentary record, the subject remains anelusive one, underappreciated by professional historians andenvironmental activists alike. In English-speaking countries as well asin Germany itself, the very existence of a "green wing" in the Nazimovement, much less its inspiration, goals, and consequences, has yetto be adequately researched and analyzed. Most of the handful of available interpretations succumb to either an alarming intellectualaffinity with their subject."
2
or a naive refusal to examine the fullextent of the "ideological overlap between nature conservation andNational Socialism."
3
This article presents a brief and necessarilyschematic overview of the ecological components of Nazism,emphasizing both their central role in Nazi ideology and theirpractical implementation during the Third Reich. A preliminarysurvey of nineteenth and twentieth century precursors to classicalecofascism should serve to illuminate the conceptual underpinningscommon to all forms of reactionary ecology.Two initial clarifications are in order. First, the terms "environmental"and "ecological" are here used more or less interchangeably to denoteideas, attitudes, and practices commonly associated with thecontemporary environmental movement. This is not an anachronism;it simply indicates an interpretive approach which highlightsconnections to present-day concerns. Second, this approach is notmeant to endorse the historiographically discredited notion that pre-1933 historical data can or should be read as "leading inexorably" tothe Nazi calamity. Rather, our concern here is with discerningideological continuities and tracing political genealogies, in an attemptto understand the past in light of our current situation -- to makehistory relevant to the present social and ecological crisis.
The Roots of the Blood and Soil Mystique
Germany is not only the birthplace of the science of ecology and thesite of Green politics' rise to prominence; it has also been home to apeculiar synthesis of naturalism and nationalism forged under theinfluence of the Romantic tradition's anti-Enlightenment irrationalism.Two nineteenth century figures exemplify this ominous conjunction:Ernst Moritz Arndt and Wilhelm Heinrich Riehl.While best known in Germany for his fanatical nationalism, Arndtwas also dedicated to the cause of the peasantry, which lead him to aconcern for the welfare of the land itself. Historians of German
http://www.spunk.org/texts/places/germany/sp001630/peter.html (2 of 25) [2008-12-09 13:04:54]
 
Ecofascism / Fascist Ideology: The Green Wing of the Nazi Party and its Historical Antecedents by Peter Staudenmaier
environmentalism mention him as the earliest example of 'ecological'thinking in the modern sense.
4
His remarkable 1815 article
On theCare and Conservation of Forests,
written at the dawn of industrialization in Central Europe, rails against shortsightedexploitation of woodlands and soil, condemning deforestation and itseconomic causes. At times he wrote in terms strikingly similar tothose of contemporary biocentrism: "When one sees nature in anecessary connectedness and interrelationship, then all things areequally important -- shrub, worm, plant, human, stone, nothing first orlast, but all one single unity."
5
 Arndt's environmentalism, however, was inextricably bound up withvirulently xenophobic nationalism. His eloquent and prescient appealsfor ecological sensitivity were couched always in terms of the well-being of the
German
soil and the
German
people, and his repeatedlunatic polemics against miscegenation, demands for teutonic racialpurity, and epithets against the French, Slavs, and Jews marked everyaspect of his thought. At the very outset of the nineteenth century thedeadly connection between love of land and militant racist nationalismwas firmly set in place.Riehl, a student of Arndt, further developed this sinister tradition. Insome respects his 'green' streak went significantly deeper than Arndt's;presaging certain tendencies in recent environmental activism, his1853 essay
Field and Forest 
ended with a call to fight for "the rightsof wilderness." But even here nationalist pathos set the tone: "Wemust save the forest, not only so that our ovens do not become cold inwinter, but also so that the pulse of life of the people continues to beatwarm and joyfully, so that Germany remains German."
6
Riehl was animplacable opponent of the rise of industrialism and urbanization; hisovertly antisemitic glorification of rural peasant values andundifferentiated condemnation of modernity established him as the"founder of agrarian romanticism and anti-urbanism."
7
 These latter two fixations matured in the second half of the nineteenthcentury in the context of the
völkisch
movement, a powerful culturaldisposition and social tendency which united ethnocentric populismwith nature mysticism. At the heart of the
völkisch
temptation was apathological response to modernity. In the face of the very realdislocations brought on by the triumph of industrial capitalism andnational unification,
völkisch
thinkers preached a return to the land, tothe simplicity and wholeness of a life attuned to nature's purity. The
http://www.spunk.org/texts/places/germany/sp001630/peter.html (3 of 25) [2008-12-09 13:04:54]

Activity (16)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
sleeben liked this
mogessol liked this
mogessol liked this
Anacsi liked this
ibardin liked this
Sabo Tabi liked this
gabrielagrg liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->