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Code Names for U.S. Military Projects and Operations

Code Names for U.S. Military Projects and Operations

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Published by bitbunker7929
Project Names and Code Words were used by military and intelligence organizations around the world for many years. They came into their own during World War I, and were virtually everywhere in World War II. The Cold War left a legacy of secrecy and a huge bureaucracy, that contributed a lot to the prevalence of Code Words and classifications, a bureaucracy which continues to dominate the US intelligence community and military to this day.
Project Names and Code Words were used by military and intelligence organizations around the world for many years. They came into their own during World War I, and were virtually everywhere in World War II. The Cold War left a legacy of secrecy and a huge bureaucracy, that contributed a lot to the prevalence of Code Words and classifications, a bureaucracy which continues to dominate the US intelligence community and military to this day.

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Published by: bitbunker7929 on Dec 11, 2008
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Code Names for U.S. Military Projects andOperations
 
HTML formatting Copyright © 2003-2005 Andreas Parsch 
Sections 1 "Names
 — 
Another Form of Designation" (except section 1.5) Copyright © 2003Andreas Gehrs-Pahl
Under Construction!
 (The sign indicates incomplete areas.)
1 Names
 — 
Another Form of Designation
(by Andreas Gehrs-Pahl)
 
Project Names and Code Words were used by military and intelligence organizations aroundthe world for many years. They came into their own during World War I, and were virtuallyeverywhere in World War II. The Cold War left a legacy of secrecy and a huge bureaucracy,that contributed a lot to the prevalence of Code Words and classifications, a bureaucracywhich continues to dominate the US intelligence community and military to this day. There isprobably only one other thing that this bureaucracy likes more than codes and classifications,and that is using abbreviations and acronyms :-). The rest of this article will deal specificallywith US DoD and related Code Words, Nicknames, etc., and not with Names and Codes of any other country.There are several different types of Names used in the US military, mostly for the purpose of designation but some simply for concealment. Most of those Names are public but deal withor describe secret things, but some Names or Code Words are actually secret by themselves.Some of the different kinds of "Names" used are:1.
 
Code Words
 
2.
 
Nicknames3.
 
Exercise Terms4.
 
Call Signs5.
 
NATO ASCC Reporting Names6.
 
Popular Names7.
 
Unit and Base Names8.
 
Vehicle NamesOf those, "Code Words" are classified, but only while they are "Active" or "Cancelled"."NATO Reporting Names" and "Call Signs" are sometimes also classified, but not always. Allothers, like "Nicknames", "Exercise Terms", and "Popular Names" are usually unclassified, asare "Available" (or unassigned) Code Words.A list of all US DoD "Code Words", "Nicknames", and "Exercise Terms", as well as US andAllied "Call Signs", their meaning, and rules and regulations on how to assign and use them,can be found in the following documents. Most of those documents are classified and areprepared for the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) or other agencies on a regular basis. For additionaldetails see also "CJCSM 3150.01A", which is available athttp://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/cjcsd/cjcsm/m315001a.pdf . 1.
 
Document Name: "CJCSM 3150.29B"Document Type: "Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Manual (CJCSM)"CJCSM Title: "Code Word, Nickname, and Exercise Term (NICKA) System"Full Name: "CODEWORD, NICKNAME, AND EXERCISE TERM REPORT"Short Name: "NICKA"Available at: https://www.scor.imsg.com/Public/0006/005011_6DM_CJCSM_3150-29A.pdf  (old edition CJCSM 3150.29A; access to current edition (3150.29B) isrestricted)2.
 
Document Name: "CJCSM 3150.06"Document Type: "Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Manual (CJCSM)"CJCSM Title: "JRS, Reconnaissance"Full Name: "RECONNAISSANCE NICKNAME REPORT"Short Name: "RECON" (was "RECON 1")3.
 
Document Name: "JANAP-119"Document Type: "Joint Army-Navy-Air Force Publication (JANAP)"Full Name: "Joint Voice Call Sign Book"4.
 
Document Name: "JANAP-299"Document Type: "Joint Army-Navy-Air Force Publication (JANAP)"Full Name: "U.S. Joint Code Work Index"5.
 
Document Name: "ACP-100"Document Type: "Allied Communications Publications (ACP)"Full Name: "U.S. Call Sign and Address Group System-Instructions and Assignment"6.
 
Document Name: "DoD 5200.1-R"Document Type: "Department of Defense Regulation"Full Name: "DoD Information Security Program"Available at: http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/html/52001r.htm  Those documents describe how Nicknames and Code Words are assigned, and which CodeWords, Nicknames, Call Signs, Exercise Terms, and alphabetical blocks for Nicknames, havebeen assigned to which agency. Nicknames and Code Words are usually assigned in blocks,by the Director of Operations, Joint Staff (JCS-J3), and assigned to specific DoD components.
 
1.1 Code Words
Code Words are always classified (CONFIDENTIAL, SECRET, or higher) and alwaysconsist of a single word. The assignment of TOP SECRET Code Words requires Director,Special Programs, ODTUSD(P), approval. Code Words or blocks of Code Words are assignedto DoD components by the Joint Staff (JS). If a Code Word has been assigned, it is consideredACTIVE. Active Code Words always need to be shown with their classification, like (S) forSECRET or (TS) for TOP SECRET, and can not be discussed on unclassified networks orlines. Normally, Code Words are printed using all capital letters. [Note: In this document,Code Words are written in S
MALL
C
APS
to enhance readability.]If a Code Word becomes compromised (or is suspected of being compromised), a new CodeWord is assigned and the old Code Word is CANCELLED. Code Words are also cancelled, if the project, program, operation, or mission they were assigned to, was either completed ordisbanded. All cancelled Code Words are still classified (at least) CONFIDENTIAL for (atleast) another two years, before they become AVAILABLE (and Unclassified) again.Available Code Words can be re-used and assigned again for a different purpose. Because of this, the only Code Words that we (the general public) know about and that we discuss here,are usually Code Words that have been cancelled at one time or another. It is highly unlikelythat such well-known and publicized Code Words as O
XCART
or T
AGBOARD
are ever re-used,but it is possible. It may even be beneficial to re-use previously cancelled Code Words for thevery same reason, as this "game" is all about deception.Code Words should not describe or suggest the nature of what is classified. Follow-onprojects or phases of a program must receive different Code Words. For example, follow-onphases of Project "G
USTO
" can't be assigned Code Words like "G
USTO
II" or "G
USTO
III".Code Words can be assigned to virtually everything that might be classified, includingPrograms, Projects, Geographical Areas or Locations, Operations, Objectives, Missions,Plans, Tasks, Information types, etc. So called "Special Access (required) Programs" (SAP),also known as "black" programs, may have a classified Code Word assigned to them, but thisis optional. Code Words are usually not assigned to Tests, Drills, Exercises, or BudgetIdentifiers, but many Special (Nuclear) Weapons Tests have received Code Words. ThoseCode Words might have originated from the DoE rather than the DoD, though.The DoD only assigns single-word Code Words, but also sometimes uses Code Words thatoriginate from other agencies (CIA, DoE, etc.), commercial companies, or foreign countries,which might not follow DoD directives for assignments of Code Words. Any and all CodeWords that are used must be registered, to prevent double assignments or confusion. All CodeWords and Nicknames are stored in the "Code Word, Nickname, and Exercise Term System"database, also known as NICKA, which was available through the military's WorldwideMilitary Command and Control System (WWMCCS) network, but is now only availablethrough the JS LAN (Joint Staff Local Area Network).Code Words are not really used to conceal the classified object itself, as the Code Wordsthemselves are classified, too, but are used instead to implement a Need-To-Know system forSensitive Compartmented Information (SCI), which is designed to keep individuals or groupsfrom knowing too much about a specific system or topic, and to limit their access to only theinformation needed to do their specific job. There are several different SCI categories used inthe DoD, and Code Words are assigned within those categories. For example, photos or tapescreated by SIGINT (Signals Intelligence) or PHOTINT (Photographic Intelligence) can be

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