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The Light of Life

The Light of Life

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Published by Daniel Drumm
“The Light of Life” is a Christian look at the nature of truth. It is a book I have written and published which you can see and read parts of at Drummlight.com. It is non-denominational and in truth gives the grounds as well as the means to regular Christians for understanding Esoteric Christianity. What it shows is that the focus by interest of Light, the Light spoken of by John in John 1:1-4, 9 KJV, is what we call thinking. Not intellectuality, but the seeking of essence which the desire to know is. Light is intelligence per se, which the quote from the first chapter of John's Gospel and 1 John 2:27 KJV make clear, and thinking, or the focusing of that Light by the desire to know is what produces both knowledge and understanding. The Light or Spirit is what shows things 'as they are' to the mind, no matter what at what level, and no matter what object or subject, for the Spirit has and is knowledge of all. This noetic clarity of the mind we regularly resort to for answers and to which we normally pose questions inwardly, is this Light John speaks of in his Gospel, the divine Logos which he states "illumines every one who comes into the world." To engage it and use it only requires honesty and truthfulness. As Frithjof Schuon states in the preface of his “Transcendental Unity of Religion” the Light of the Intuition (or higher intellect) is man’s direct link to the Absolute, literal participation with and in the Spirit, and is superior to both rationality, with its mood of doubt and its conceptual means, and faith based in revelation, which revelation is always second hand to the believer.

What in Christianity led over time to the loss of this understanding about how the mind works is talked about in my book, but the use of the Light described in it goes beyond the normal philosophical and religious forms. Anyone who looks at their own experience can confirm the facts it speaks of for themselves. “The Light of Life” makes it clear that knowing, or yoga/union, is a spiritual act... a 'union' made possible by the Light.

For those who seek God through understanding, meditation, or prayerful insight the book seeks to supplement the many Christian teachings about Love, with one for the mind about the Light that enables it to see. The Churches have ignored this aspect of God as Light (1 Jn 1:5), which John states is the Logos (or divine Reason of Greek philosophy), in their zeal to reach and include the lowest common denominator men can relate to and agree upon. Hence God is presented as Love (1 John 4:8), and the heart is emphasized, but the mind, which uses discrimination is downplayed or negated and instead is required to let the religion’s own doctrine and dogma do all of its thinking for it. This is thought of as humility or obedience. However it makes of Christianity a one-winged bird, when in fact both wings, Love and Light, are necessary for flight (1 Jn 1:5; 1 Jn 4:8 KJV). The path of Light or Knowledge did exist in Christianity’s past, and that path was not merely some historical Gnosticism. Included in the appendix is a history of the influence of Greek Philosophy on the New Testament to make it clear that Christianity is really, as the philosophers have stated, 'Plato for the masses'. I also provide a long quotation from Philo, a Jewish philosopher around the time of Christ who studied Plato extensively and crafted a bridge, a bridge of which Christianity made extensive use, between Greek philosophy and Jewish revelation.

The appendix also includes quotes from the major religions about overcoming death and the making of the immortal Physical body. It also gives quotes that relate other religions and theosophy to Christianity, which becomes possible once the spiritual nature of the knowing element is established (ie, the intution that lies beyond the rational intellect, but which the right focus of one’s light and reason leads to). All religions are by no means the same, any more than the colors a prism splits ligh
“The Light of Life” is a Christian look at the nature of truth. It is a book I have written and published which you can see and read parts of at Drummlight.com. It is non-denominational and in truth gives the grounds as well as the means to regular Christians for understanding Esoteric Christianity. What it shows is that the focus by interest of Light, the Light spoken of by John in John 1:1-4, 9 KJV, is what we call thinking. Not intellectuality, but the seeking of essence which the desire to know is. Light is intelligence per se, which the quote from the first chapter of John's Gospel and 1 John 2:27 KJV make clear, and thinking, or the focusing of that Light by the desire to know is what produces both knowledge and understanding. The Light or Spirit is what shows things 'as they are' to the mind, no matter what at what level, and no matter what object or subject, for the Spirit has and is knowledge of all. This noetic clarity of the mind we regularly resort to for answers and to which we normally pose questions inwardly, is this Light John speaks of in his Gospel, the divine Logos which he states "illumines every one who comes into the world." To engage it and use it only requires honesty and truthfulness. As Frithjof Schuon states in the preface of his “Transcendental Unity of Religion” the Light of the Intuition (or higher intellect) is man’s direct link to the Absolute, literal participation with and in the Spirit, and is superior to both rationality, with its mood of doubt and its conceptual means, and faith based in revelation, which revelation is always second hand to the believer.

What in Christianity led over time to the loss of this understanding about how the mind works is talked about in my book, but the use of the Light described in it goes beyond the normal philosophical and religious forms. Anyone who looks at their own experience can confirm the facts it speaks of for themselves. “The Light of Life” makes it clear that knowing, or yoga/union, is a spiritual act... a 'union' made possible by the Light.

For those who seek God through understanding, meditation, or prayerful insight the book seeks to supplement the many Christian teachings about Love, with one for the mind about the Light that enables it to see. The Churches have ignored this aspect of God as Light (1 Jn 1:5), which John states is the Logos (or divine Reason of Greek philosophy), in their zeal to reach and include the lowest common denominator men can relate to and agree upon. Hence God is presented as Love (1 John 4:8), and the heart is emphasized, but the mind, which uses discrimination is downplayed or negated and instead is required to let the religion’s own doctrine and dogma do all of its thinking for it. This is thought of as humility or obedience. However it makes of Christianity a one-winged bird, when in fact both wings, Love and Light, are necessary for flight (1 Jn 1:5; 1 Jn 4:8 KJV). The path of Light or Knowledge did exist in Christianity’s past, and that path was not merely some historical Gnosticism. Included in the appendix is a history of the influence of Greek Philosophy on the New Testament to make it clear that Christianity is really, as the philosophers have stated, 'Plato for the masses'. I also provide a long quotation from Philo, a Jewish philosopher around the time of Christ who studied Plato extensively and crafted a bridge, a bridge of which Christianity made extensive use, between Greek philosophy and Jewish revelation.

The appendix also includes quotes from the major religions about overcoming death and the making of the immortal Physical body. It also gives quotes that relate other religions and theosophy to Christianity, which becomes possible once the spiritual nature of the knowing element is established (ie, the intution that lies beyond the rational intellect, but which the right focus of one’s light and reason leads to). All religions are by no means the same, any more than the colors a prism splits ligh

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Published by: Daniel Drumm on Dec 12, 2008
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“In him was life, which life was the light of men... That was thetrue Light which enlightens every man who comes into the world.”
John 1: 4, 9
 Moses at the Well of Be'er (Dura)
The
L
ight of 
L
ife
Daniel Drumm
 
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The angels of peace weep bitterly. The roads are ruined,and no one travels the Way. The covenant is made void.
Isaiah 33: 7-8
 Athor’s Not
What the concept of the Logos - theologically translated as the Word - meant in Christ’s day, and the relationGreek philosophy had to Christianity, can be read in a brief selection from the
Cliff Notes to the New Testament 
 before the main text is read. It is included at the start of the appendix. Otherwise it might be felt that the statementsmade in the text about Light and Reason don’t relate to Christianity. It is strange that later centuries have practicallyerased the role that reason (logos) and the mind or understanding (nous) play in connecting man to the Logos. TheLogos was known anciently as Reason, or the acting Ideas, Order, or Intelligence of God. The claim that Jesus wasGod was made primarily because John said in the opening lines of his Gospel that Jesus was the Logos, a conceptfrom Greek philosophy. Other quotes like, “Why do you call me good? There is One who is good and He is God”(Mt 19:17; Mk 10:18; Lk 18:19), coupled with Jesus’ claim that he was not blaspheming when he called himself the Son of God, because
everyone
who is taught by the Spirit is a Son of God (Jn 10: 2-6; Rom 8:14,16; Jn 6:45;Heb 8: 6-1; Psalm 82: 1, 6-7) argue against it. So what the Logos meant in Greek philosophy, and in Philo, calledthe Thirteenth Apostle, whose ideas helped shape early Christian thought, is important to understand.“God is Truth, and his shadow is Light.” Philo, who was familiar with this saying of Plato’s, called the Logosthe shadow of God; and the Apostle John identified the Logos as “the true Light which enlightens everyone com-ing into the world.” The Logos was conceived as “apportioned into an infinite number of parts in humans”
(Philo:Her. 24-26)
, with the reasoning capacity of the human mind being a portion of the all-pervading Divine Logos.The mind itself was a special gift to humans from God and has a divine essence (from Hillar’s notes on Philo in theappendix p.22).In the Various Notes section (p.21) which follows the Cliff Notes In the appendix are statements from differentreligious and noetic traditions that amplify the text, and indicate that other traditions than the Christian are similarlyaware of many things Jesus and the Apostles taught.Following that are the ideas of a Jewish philosopher of Christ’s time, Philo
(20 B.C.-50 A.D.)
, with whom Paul andJohn seem familiar (p.22). His ideas form an extraordinary link between Jewish and Greek thinking, and perhapshelped enable the Apostles to communicate to their varied audiences. If Jesus’ words about manna are accuratelyreported they sound unaccountably like Philo’s. Philo
 
attempted to relate Greek philosophy with Jewish revelationand was influential in early Christian thinking. He was even called the 1th Apostle. The selections on Philo includ-ed in the notes are by Marion Hillar, from the
 Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
.Following the notes in the appendix every Biblical reference cited in the text is included in full (p.24). Theyare arranged in order and in columns so you can flip back and forth to the text. Following that are a few specificBiblical references that concern overcoming death (p.29).
Danil Dr
February 25, 2007
Please send any questions or comments to Humata@aol.com. Include “Light of Life” in the subject header.
Frontispiece: Moses at the Well of Be’er- from Dura (Europas), detail of the wall-painting from the Synagogue at Dura.Columbia University Art Database, http://www.mcah.columbia.edu/cgi-bin/dbcourses/item?skip=140
"
The greatest Church Fathers attest... there is... an ontological link or bond (sungeneia)connecting the human present with the divine future. As Zizioulas, discussing JustinMartyr, summarizes: 'The permanent sungeneia between God and man through themedium of nous leads us to take the idea of logos, employed by Justin in a christologi-cal sense, as the bond between God and the world, between truth and the mind. Christ,as the logos of God, becomes this very link between truth and the mind, and the truth of  philosophy is nothing less than part of this logos."' 
- Edward Moore, STD, PhD

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