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First Magnetic Roasting Plant

First Magnetic Roasting Plant

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Published by ranjeevkumar
Iron ore processing
Iron ore processing

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: ranjeevkumar on Apr 11, 2012
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03/29/2014

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AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF
MINING AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERS
Technical Publication No.
731
(C~aas
.
MILLING
ND
CONCENTRATION,O. 58; C~aaaC, IRON
ND
STEELD~IBION:NO.67)
DISCUSSION
OF
THIS PAPER
IS
INVITED. It should preferably be presented by the, con-tributor in person at the New York Meeting Februa 1937 when an abstract cf the paper wlll beread. If thls is impossible, discussion in writ'ing mayTe aent' to the Secretary, American Institute ofMining and Metallurgical Engineers. 29
West
39th Street, New York, N. Y. Unlesa special arrange-ment is made, diacussion of thia paper will close April
1,
1937. Any discussion offeredthereafter shouldpreferably be in the form of a new paper.
First Magnetic Roasting Plant in Lake Superior Region*
BY
E.
W.
DAVIS,~ MEMBERA.I.M.E.
(New York Meeting. February, 1937)
IF
the tonnage of merchantable iron ore remaining in the LakeSuperior district is divided by the average of the annual shipments for thepast
20
years, it will be found that this ore supply will be exhausted inapproximately
35
years.This computed exhaustion period would be anindication of the future activities of the iron-mining industry if it were notfor the fact that merchantable ore is being manufactured from low-gradeore, of which there is an almost inexhaustible supply in the Lake Superiordistrict.
It
is true that at present only the simplest of these low-gradeores are being concentrated to any considerable extent, but progress isbeing made with the treatment of the more complex ores, and now, inaddition to
20
washing plants on the Mesabi Range, three plants areequipped with jigs for the treatment of ore that cannot be concentratedsimply by washing. The latest addition to the ore-treating plants of the~esabiange is a magnetic roasting and concentration plant at Cooley.,Minn., in which ore that cannot be concentrated either by washing orby jigging is roasted to the magnetic state and concentrated on magneticseparators.This plant is beginning its third season of operation, andwhile it is too soon to make definite predictions, there are strong indica-tions that this new process may make commercially possible the manu-facture of high-grade, merchantable iron ore from large quantities oflow-grade ore now considered worthless.After the iron oxide contained in an ore has been converted to mag-netite, almost any desired grade of concentrate can be produced, usingmagnetic-concentration equipment of the types now in general use forthe concentration of the natural magnetites of New York, New Jerseyand Pennsylvania. The conversion of hematite (Fe203) to magnetite(Fe304) s easily accomplidhed by heating the ore to a dull red tempera-ture in a reducing atmosphere. The reaction is slightly endothermic, andwhile it requires
200
B.t.u. to heat to
900'
F. one pound of hematite orecontaining
45
per cent Fe, it requires only
100
B.t.u. to convert theoxide into magnetite.In the laboratory, using small quantities of ore,this conve~sions very simple, but large furnaces suitable for commercial
*This paper was issued as a
Technical Publication
to the Milling Methods Com-mittee in November. In order not to confuse references to the paper, the page num-bers of the original T.
P.
have been retained, making the paper begin here on page
3.
Manuscript received at the office of the Institute July
15,
1936.
t
Superintendent, Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Min-neapolis, Minn.
3
Copyright, 1936, by the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. Inc.Printed in U.
8.
A.METALB ECANOLOQYDecember. 1936
 
4
FIRST
MAGNETIC ROASTING
PLANT
IN
LAKE
SUPERIOR
REGION
use are not available, and several years ago the Mines ExperimentStation of the University of Minnesota undertook the development of amagnetic roasting furnace that would be specifically applicable to thetreatment of the low-grade ores of the Lake Superior district.
It
was desired to roast the ore at a comparatively coarse size in orderto produce concentrate of as large a size as possible, therefore the investi-gation of shaft-type furnaces was undertaken, because this type handlescoarse ore satisfactorily and possesses other advantages such as simplicityof construction, freedom from moving parts and efficiency of heat trans-fer. Shaft-type furnaces of several sizes and kinds were constructedand studied, and early in 1934 it appeared that the results secured war-ranted the construction of a larger furnace for commercial use.Accordingly, an arrangement was made with Butler Brothers of St.Paul, Minn., whereby the University of Minnesota erected
a
250-tonroasting furnace at Cooley, Minn., and Butler Brothers constructed theore-handling equipment and the magnetic-concentration plant. Theroasting furnace and concentration plant were operated during the
1934
and 1935 ore-shipping seasons as an experimental unit under thedirection of the staff of the Mines Experiment Station, and during thisperiod 29,074 tons of tailings rejected from two near-by jigging plantswere roasted and concentrated magnetically, resulting in the productionof 15,870 tons of merchantable ore. The University's interest in thisplant was then sold to Butler Brothers, who put the plant into com-mercial operation in the spring of 1936.During the two years in which the Experiment Station operated theCooley roasting furnace, several changes were necessary in certain detailsof the design, primarily because of difficulties traceable to the impropermovement of the ore through the shaft of the furnace. The subject ofore movement has been studied in considerable detail, but the informa-tion that has been secured is by no means complete. In the descriptionthat follows, the furnace in its final form,
as
it appeared at the beginningof the 1936 season,
is
described in detail.
 
E.
W.
DAVIS
FIG.
.-DIAGRAMMATIC DRAWING OF
COOLEY
OASTING FURNACE.

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