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2009-10 Souvenir Edition

2009-10 Souvenir Edition

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HowaboutaFerndalescavengerhunt,completewithprizeforthosethatfinish
Enterprisestaffphotos 
ExploringFerndale’shistoric MainStreetanditsneighbor-ingavenuesisagreatactivitforvisitors.Soistakinginthe area’scountryside.Whileyou maynotbedrivinga5Chevy,youcanfollowthelead ofFerndalesistersEllieGreen,left,CarolynMeade,center,andLorettaHuntressandven-tureoutalittle.Packapicniandenjoydiscoveringthesce-nary.Enterprisecolumnist WendyLestinahasafewhintaboutwhatyoumayfind! 
ServingtheEel,BearandMattoleRiverValleysSince1878June2009
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Ferndale’shistorybegan inwilds andwillows Think you’ve seen and done it all onyour visit to Ferndale? Wait a minute!
By Vi
 
ola Ru
 
s
 
s McBri
 
deDo you ever wonderwhat met the gaze of themen who climbed TableBluff in 1852 and lookedsouthward over the EelRiver Valley to what wouldlater become Ferndale?According to variousOLD old-timers, most of the valley was covered witha dense thicket of willows,punctuated here and thereby conifers, primarily spruce and redwood. I canremember as a child, early in the 20th century, hugesingle trees with night-marish twisted limbsthroughout the valley.Seth Shaw and hisbrother, Stephen, did morethan gaze across the tan-gled willows of the valley.Early in that summer of 1852, they went exploring.In August, with a friend,Willard Allen, they pad-dled an Indian dugoutcanoe from Eel River’sNorth Bay south across themouth of the Eel River andup the Salt River branch tothe south of Francis Creek.Here, they beachedtheir canoe and followedan elk trail up the creek until they came to an open-ing close to the base of thehills where there were nowillows.Ferns grew over theopening. Some say they were so tall they wouldcover a man on horseback.Tall enough that the party decided to call the place“Ferndale.”The rainy season wasclose at hand, so the threehurried to build shelter.Before long, they had builtthemselves a cabin with anearthen fireplace forwarmth and cooking.As time went on, one of their visitors was Seth Kin-man, later a famous hunter,trapper and acquaintanceof two U. S. presidents, aswell as barkeep at TableBluff.In 1853, Ferndale heldits first election, where else
 
By Wendy Le
 
st
 
inaEnter
 
pr
 
ise columnist
A long weekend inFerndale is delicious: youshop, walk Main Street,eat four meals in closesuccession, drive out tothe beach, see a play,watch a parade, tour themuseum, and take thetwo mandatory hikes: upinto the splendor of RussPark, and up again to thetop of the cemetery.If you’re in the mar-ket for local color, andthe season is right, youcan cheer at a high schoolfootball or soccer game(or elementary schoolbasketball), play bocce inthe Fireman’s Park (equipment is availableto rent at J&W Liquorsfor $5), worship at one of our five churches (Fern-dale Community; St.Mark’s Missouri SynodLutheran; St. Mary’sEpiscopal; Our Savior’sELCA Lutheran; andAssumption Catholic),eat yet again at the Vet-eran’s Sunday breakfast,and – yet again – at the(free) Sunday night sup-per & show in the socialhall of Our Savior’s.But what if … youstayed longer? Five days?A week? Sure, the week-ends are jam-packedwith nonstop fun (Fern-dale is so busy that itsunofficial motto is thespot-on remark fromNina Brown: “In Fern-dale 50 years can go by and you haven’t doneyour breakfast dishesyet”) – but what aboutthose pesky weekdays?Suddenly, all yournew best friends arebusy; the toll of midnighthas turned the partyersback into merchants andteachers and builders andfarmers. Wait a minute!No one without a cos-tume ever has to go towork in Disneyland.
 
Head tothefriendlyFerndaleMuseumfor historylesson
The FerndaleMuseum serves as a liv-ing history classroom.Visitors are invited tosit on period furniturein our Victorian parlorand listen to a tune onour player piano.When you have restedyou may stroll downthe “lane” and peek into the windows of ourVictorian rooms. Sev-eral rooms, including adining room, formalparlor, bathroom,kitchen and bedroomare set up as they wouldhave been in the late1800s.Visitors will alsofind Ferndale’s last bar-bershop in its entirety,a circa 1900 Bosch-
(see 
MU
 
SEU
 
M/
 page 13) (see 
HUNT/
 page 12) 
 
This spring
TheFern-daleEnterprise 
celebratedthe 131st anniversary of its birth. It was on May 11,1878 that the Jones boys— William Gaston, Jamesand Archibald, sons of thetown's Methodist minis-ter — launched theirweekly newspaper. It has-n't missed an issue since.The Joneses had takenspace on Brown Street tohouse their offices andprinting press. WilliamGaston Jones was the edi-tor. He and his brothershad launched
TheEnter- prise 
as an answer to oft-expressed dreams of Ferndale citizens to havetheir own newspaper, andalso in the face of skepti-cism that the venturecould succeed financially.Within a few months, theJones brothers hadremoved any lingering
Enterprise staff photo 
The tradition of The Enterprise began with the Jones boys, sons of the town’s Methodist minister, back in 1878.
Ferndale Enterprise 
keeps thepresses rolling for 131 years
Courtesy Thomas Stewart, Blue Sky Photography 
The Humboldt County Fair offers an eight-day racing meet in August when racing enthusiasts can watch Thoroughbreds, Arabians, Appaloosas and mules race around a half-mile track.
Fair legend continues in 2009
Since 1896, theHumboldt County Fairhas been a vital and inte-gral part of Ferndale.Located on thenorthern end of town,the 65-acre fairgroundsrepresents about one-fourth of the city's geo-graphic composition andcontributes substantialeconomic and social ben-efits to the "Cream City"and its surrounding com-munities.The HumboldtCounty Fair Association,a non-profit organiza-tion, assumes the opera-tional and administrativeresponsibilities for run-ning the fairgrounds,which include year-round rental of buildingsand facilities and theproduction of the annual11-day county fair.Despite the fair
(see 
FAIR /
 page 15) 
 
doubts by engaging salesagents in Eureka, Rohn-erville, Petrolia — evenSacramento and San Fran-cisco.In 1880, the ReverendJones left the Methodist
(see 
EN
 
TERPRISE
 
/
 page 14) (See HIS 
 
TORY/page 14) 
 
Page 2 The Ferndale (California) Enterprise
600 Main Street, Ferndale, California 95536(P. O. Box 1066)Telephone 707/786-4611 • Fax 707/786-4311E-mail: editor@ferndaleenterprise.us
www.ferndaleenterprise.us
Founded 1878.Caroline Titus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Publisher, Editor,Caroline Blattner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ProofreaderPublished by Cages Publishing, Inc.Caroline Titus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PresidentStuart Titus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice-PresidentMember, California Newspaper Publishers’ Association,
The annual Souvenir Edition is published every summerand is available free of charge from participatingsponsors. Copies bymail: $5 each.
Several rooms have win-dow alcoves overlookingFerndale's historic MainStreet. The rooms havebeen lavishly appointedwith exquisite linens,antique armoires and fur-niture. There are tele-phones in every room,cable television is avail-able upon request andcable or wireless Internetaccess is available at nocharge.The ambiance is turn-of-the-century splendor,and the sky-lit, fern-filledhallways make a strollseem like a trip back intime. Guests may choosefrom the masculineappointments of the IraRuss Suite, named for theInn's builder, or its sister-suite, the Maggie C. RussRoom, featuring a king-size bed, a window alcoveand an adjoining singleguest or child's room.The Enos Room is namedfor a beloved local pio-neer clan and featuresfamily photos and treas-ured Victoriana. Itsadjoining suite, the Barn-aby Room, has beennamed for Ferndale'sfamous carriage horse.There are severalother rooms decorated incrisp, bright lace andsummer colors, includingJessica’s Haven, named forJenny’s daughter, andHana’s Hideaway, theEmily Rose Room,Maren’s Suite and Sylvia’sRoom, named for thecouple’s beloved grand-daughters. A conferenceroom is available formeetings and retreats forlarger groups. And guestsare served a full breakfasteach morning.The Victorian Inn andits guests are extremely fortunate to have Curley Tait, the premier restau-rateur on the NorthCoast, offering his finedining experiences on thepremises. It’s a case of “Everybody Wins.”Guests will enjoy lux-ury accommodations,exceptional service, greatfood and all the warmthand comfort of a small village inn in this well-known historic landmark.
THE VIC 
 
 
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Photo courtesy of The Victorian Inn 
The Victorian Inn offers accommodations, a fine restaurant and conference/meet-ing facilities.
Victorian Inn offers turn-of-the-century splendor
For over a century,the building housing theVictorian Inn of Ferndalehas been a keystone inthe life of this famous vil-lage. It has been restoredwith loving detail andattention, and is ownedand operated by Jenny Oaks and Lowell Daniels.The first-class accom-modations can fill 21st-century needs whilesurrounding its guestswith the ambiance of theleisurely, luxurious past.The newest additionto the Inn is Anna’s Suiteon the ground floor, fea-turing a king-size bed-room, a living room, acomputer work station & printer, a full kitchen, alarge screen TV, and ahuge bathroom with ashower and a separateclaw foot tub. It wasnamed after a dear friendwho, although she lovedit here, could never stay because she was in awheel chair and couldn’tnegotiate the stairs. Shehas since passed away,but if she were still withus we could enjoy hercompany as a guest, andothers who might havedifficulty managing thestaircase to the upperrooms can now relax andenjoy Ferndale in luxury and comfort.The Victorian-appointed rooms all haveprivate baths, some withold-fashioned claw-foottubs and accessories.
Need a chocolate fix? Head to Sweetness & Light
Enterprise staff photo 
Sweetness and Light offers not only the finest choco-lates, it also has a take-out window for those quick fixes of coffee and chocolate! 
The sight, fragranceand taste of handmade,traditional chocolates areat Sweetness & Light.Located next to thepost office, the candy kitchen and store carry ona tradition that goes back to the turn of the 20thcentury. Candies are stillcooked the old-fashionedway: in small batches, withonly the best quality ingre-dients and no preserva-tives added.Many days you canobserve through thekitchen window the cook-ing and dipping of tradi-tional opera creams,fudges, brittles andcaramels. But time hasnot stood still in thekitchen, and you can alsoobserve the cooking anddipping of truffles, giantall-nut patties, a variety of candy bars (gooey andoutrageously rich or nutty crunchy), and chocolatenovelties including choco-late lollies, cows, basketsand boxes.If you're looking for aquick and delicious coffeefix, the Sweetness & LightEspresso Take-Out Win-dow will certainly please.Select a traditionalespresso coffee or any number of specialty cof-fee drinks served from6:30 am - 5 pm daily. Thecandy store is open from10:00 am - 5 pm Monday through Saturday and 11am - 5 pm Sunday.If you have a favoritecandy that you can't livewithout, be sure to callahead so we can have itwaiting for you. We look forward to seeing yousoon.Sweetness & Light: Cel-ebrating 30 Years of Deli-cious Confections.
SWE 
 
ET 
 
NE 
 
SS & LIGH 
 
554 Main St 
 
 
eet Tel. 7 
 
 
7/7 
 
 
6-
 
4403 or FAX 707/ 
 
 
 
6-4413 
 
 
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gray, rainy Saturday after-noon, the Hart Theatrewas to present its last pic-ture show. Bogart andBacall, Hepburn andTracy, Laurel and Hardy became names from a glo-rious, but fading past. Andthe Hart Theatre mournedtheir passing.The building wouldremain empty until 1972,when Ferndale business-men and women, dairy farmers, local residentsand artists who envisioneda performing arts centerin their town, rehabilitatedthe Hart and their visionbecame reality: The Fern-dale Repertory Theatrewas born.Theatres traditionallboast of their residentghosts—the shades of actors or actresses whoThe Rep will open its2009-2010 season in Sep-tember, with what hasmade The Rep a populardestination for nearly fourdecades: quality live per-formances that appeal toa broad audience.The Rep’s line-up of plays, showcases, and spe-cial events has somethingfor everyone—familiesenjoy affordable enter-tainment, children andyoung adults participatein the creative processonstage, and, behind-the-scenes, adult actors,designers, and technicianshone their skills, and audi-ences marvel at the superbquality of productionsavailable in a charmingVictorian setting.In 1920, the P.F. Hartfamily built a theatre inFerndale. Families flockedto the Hart to marvel atthe “movies” and swoonover Rudolf Valentino,idolize the “It” Girl, andchortle with Chaplin. Bur-lesque was big and roadshows made Ferndale aregular stop on their tour.By 1928, Thomas Edi-son’s “talking pictures”were all the rage and theHart installed the equip-ment to cater to an audi-ence hungry for this new form of entertainment.Twenty-eight yearslater, in 1956, on a typical
 The Ferndale Repertory Theatre
(see 
REP/
 page 15) 
Celebrating 38 years of engaging live entertainment!
 
Ring’s Pharmacy: Oldestdrug store in California
It’s as if there has beena Ring’s Pharmacy in Fer-ndale for as long as therehas been a Main Street.J.H. Ring originally dispensed his pills andelixirs across the streetfrom the present location,in a towering structurebuilt in 1894-95. The 362Main Street store is com-mercial Eastlake Stick.(The J.H. Ring family lived above the store andenjoyed a balcony, sinceremoved.)When J.H. Ringretired, he passed thebusiness to his son,Meredith.The building was rein-forced with steel rods andtimber braces followingthe 1906 earthquake. Infact, these braces are to becredited for holding thebuilding during the April1992 earthquakes.Owner Tom Renneroperates the pharmacy behind the ornately-carved redwood fixture inthe back. You can’t alwayssee him, but he’s alwayshappy to greet customersand answer questions.Walk in, and you willnotice that Ring’s is morethan a drug store. Thefront end is stocked witha little bit of most things,including cosmetics, film,postcards, sunglasses andfirst-aid supplies. You alsocan find character cookie jars, novelty salt and pep-per shakers, NapoleonPorcelain flowers, mini-hinged boxes, BeanieBabies and old-fashionedRaggedy Anns. One alsocan take advantage of two-day film processing.Even better, print fromyour digital cameraor a print-to-printwhile you wait at theKodak Kiosk.“In Ferndale,there isn’t a one-stoptype of super store, sowe try to carry a vari-ety of items,” saysTom. “The ‘regulars’know where the‘tricky items’ are - butmost customers, res-idents and visitorsalike, end up askingfor what they arelooking for.
RI 
 
NG’ 
 
PHARMACY 362 Main Str 
 
 
et Tel. 70 
 
7/ 
 
 
86-4511
 
Enterprise staff photo 
Ring’s Pharmacy at 362 Main St.
Courtesy Ferndale Rep 
The Ferndale Repertory Theatre was built in 1920 and has been an integral part of the town since its days as a movie theatre and now as a home for quality live  performances.
your headquarters for Pol-ish Pottery. Importedfrom Poland, these col-lectable art pieces are of heirloom quality.Para-sol Arts isopenWednes-day throughFriday from 10am to 9 pm and weekends,noon to 5 pm.Private parties areavailable weekends: 10 amto noon and 6 pm to 9 pm.Walk-ins always welcome.No appointments neces-sary."We don't teachclasses. We teach whenyou sit in the chair."
PARAS 
 
OL ART 
 
40 
 
5 Main St 
 
 
 
et Te 
 
l. 7 
 
 
7/ 
 
 
86-
 
4444 
 
Enterprise staff photo 
Children are welcome at Parasol Arts and enjoy paint-ing their own pottery.
Parasol Arts Paint-Your-Own-Pottery justcelebrated their third yearanniversary! Owners,Brad and Cathy Curtis,have created a unique andcolorful atmospherewhere painting pottery istruly a pleasure. But,painting pottery isn’t theonly attraction.Birthday parties andspecial events are possiblein a variety of packages.School fieldtrips arealways welcome as well asclassroom “To Go Kits.”Gallery art, as well ascards, gift wrap and cus-tom hand-painted tilework are also available.Parasol Arts has beena great resource forfundraising. Let us helpyour club, group or non-profit maximize yourmoney-making potential.Parasol Arts is also
Happy anniversary!
 
Page 3 The Ferndale (California) Enterprise
Silva’s Fine Jewelry is home tounique collection of rare gems
Photos courtesy of Silva’s Fine Jewelry 
 Jenny Oaks and Lowell Daniels moved their highly successful fine jewelry business, Silva’s Fine Jewelry,from Sutter Creek to Ferndale.
The former frontparlors of the historicVictorian Inn now houseone of the largest andmost luxurious collec-tions of rare gems andfine jewelry in NorthernCalifornia. The uniquecollection of specially designed pieces fromaround the world dis-played in the rich com-fort of this landmark building make shoppingfor fine jewelry an expe-rience to be remem-bered.Owners LowellDaniels and Jenny Oaksrelocated their highly successful fine jewelry business from the goldcountry of Sutter Creek,where it flourished for18 years. On a trip toHumboldt County, they encountered theenchanting village of Ferndale and the historicVictorian Inn. They immediately fell in lovewith the area and pur-chased the building inJanuary 1999.The store is namedafter Lowell's grandfa-ther, Joseph Rose Silva,born in the PortugueseAzore Islands. Lowell'sgrandfather immigratedto California and,although born here,Lowell treasures his Por-tuguese heritage. Anoriginal portrait of hisgrandfather overlooksthe beautiful setting of the store.Lowell is a graduategemologist and a certi-fied gemologistappraiser. He spent sev-eral years obtaining hisformal education fromthe Gemological Insti-tute of America. He hasa large following of reg-ular clients from acrossthe U.S. and Europe. Low-ell's buying trips through-out the world have allowedhim to collect a selectionof rare gemstones, uniqueoriginal designs and many,many friends and fansover the years. Becausethe couple rarely buysfrom factories or sales rep-resentatives, their costs arefar below market average,hence their large client fol-lowing.Jenny has also studiedgemology and her style,insight and grace makeselecting a special piece of  jewelry a memorable expe-rience. The store special-izes in custom designs andrepairs and features one of the few Computer-AidedJewelry Design systems inNorthern California. Ittakes only moments withLowell to design, graphi-cally visualize, then printa photograph of a spe-cially created piece.Along with dia-monds, rubies, sapphires,emeralds and other pre-cious gems, the large var-ied inventory includescameos, jade, pearls,tourmaline, tanzaniteand many other rare andlovely gemstones fromaround the world, alongwith many other worksof art and treasures. Thebeautifully appointed,specially lit surroundingsmake selecting a specialpiece of fine jewelry anexperience to rememberat Silva's.
SILVA’S FI 
 
NE  JEWELRY 40 
 
0 Ocean Av 
 
enue 
 
 
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ucts for men, women, andthe kitchen in several fra-grances, lotions, handtherapy, foot care, fancy soaps, salts, bath andshower gels. For that ele-gant gift, of course, thereare Crabtree and Evelynspecialty gift packets.Camille Beckman’s vanillaproducts and our Euro-pean Soaps still remain afavorite of locals. For thatcozy gift our plush robes,bed socks, slippers and jackets are a treat for all.Please plan your visitand shopping experiencesoon. We will be glad tomeet you and make new friends. Be sure to give usyour email address so thatyou can be made aware of special events, sales, andcoupons. The FerndaleEmporium is open Mon-day-Saturday, 10 to 5 andSunday, 11 to 4, with afterhour and Internet shop-ping. Gift cards, personalshopping service, gift reg-istry and complimentary gift-wrapping are part of our services.
FE 
 
RNDALE EMPORIUM 344 Main St 
 
 
ee 
 
Tel. 707/ 
 
78 
 
6-9 
 
87 
 
Fax: 7 
 
07/ 
 
 
86-9882 
 
ww.f 
 
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dal 
 
 
emp 
 
orium.com 
 
Courtesy photo.
Home of The Ferndale Emporium.
The Ferndale Empo-rium is located in the 1899Eastlake Victorian that wasoriginally built for theLowenthals’ Ferndale Reli-able Store. Since that timethe building has seenmany changes such as aBuick dealership, theater,skating rink, mortuary,church, art gallery, amongothers. The FerndaleEmporium continues thelegacy of a quality store inthis location. Over thepast 11 years we havemade friends and cus-tomers that we ship to allover the world. We inviteyou to visit our store inperson or via the Internetat (www.ferndale-empo-rium.com).Our unique andaffordable boutique spe-cializes in items for thatspecial friend, girlfriend,sister, or mom. Make herday special with one of akind jewelry, purses,scarves, or travel acces-sories.To enhance your bathand spa area, mirrors,towel racks and accessoriesare matched together withour broad range of bathproducts and candles,including candles fromWood Wick and Archi-pelago. The ThymesCompany provides prod-
 The Ferndale Emporium celebrates 11 years
Guys are welcome at Girlie Girls
After being open only one year, the trendy littleshop, Girlie Girls, hasexpanded. Due to a largenumber of requests fromthe local community they’ve added men’s cloth-ing to their inventory.The “back room” atGirlie Girls is now dedi-cated to “the guys,” sport-ing Levi’s, Lucky brandand Big Star jeans andapparel.“What a fun yearwe’ve had,” commentedLaurel Johnson and KimRenfer, sisters who co-own the shop. “Our com-munity has been very supportive and we are sograteful. We are listeningto our customers anddoing our best to bring theitems they want at rea-sonable prices.”One step inside GirlieGirls and you know you’renot in Kansas any more.The fragrant MainStreet store is filled withglitter, sequins, jeans,peek-a-boo heels andeverything a girl couldever want to feel, well,
Enterprise staff photo 
Find Girlie Girls in the pink on Main Street.
form that many peoplethink has died out or asso-ciate solely with horse-shoeing.In the BlacksmithShop’s collection of hand-forged pieces, it is clearthat blacksmithing is aliveand well. The productsoffered for sale cover awide range from func-tional art such as cutlery,bottle openers, clocks, mir-rors, lamps, tables, beds,fireplace tools, wine racks,pot racks, and candle-holders to decorative itemssuch as wall art and sculp-tures.In 2003, they opened agallery two buildings downfrom the main shop at 491Main Street to increasetheir display area for largerfurniture and sculpturalpieces. Most of the prod-ucts for sale are hand-forged iron, but there arealso pieces made usingbrass, copper and bronze.Many of the sculpturalpieces for sale are castbronze, like Mark Hop-kins’ fishing sculptures andTim Cotterill’s (aka TheFrogman) frogs.While the majority of the Blacksmith Shop’sinventory is made frommetal, they also sell finehand-made products inother media, some of which is made locally likeHolly Yashi jewelry, Fireand Light recycled glassdishware, glass paper-weights by Jesse Taj, andwire sculptures by Eliza-beth Berrien. Otherunique offerings includeOrient & Flume glass andBovano enameled copperwall hangings, both forwhich the BlacksmithShop is the exclusiveretailer in HumboldtCounty.The Blacksmith Shop’sextensive inventory has putthem on the map amongretailers of hand-made art.The Blacksmith Shopat 455 Main Street wasestablished in 1979 withone objective: to create anextensive collection of contemporary black-smithing. Thirty yearslater, this objective hasbeen achieved, as the shopbuys from over 125 black-smiths, mostly fromwithin the U.S. The shophas two reasons for main-taining this size of collec-tion – one is to supportblacksmiths by purchas-ing their work, and theother is to introduce thegeneral public to an art
Wide variety of handmadeart at The Blacksmith Shop
Courtesy photo 
The Blacksmith Shop at 455 Main Street houses an extensive collection of contemporary blacksmithing items.
Courtesy photo 
The Blacksmith Shop Gallery can be found just down the street from the main store at 491 Main Street.
girlie.Renfer and Johnson’sfour daughters are also very much in the picture,along with other employ-ees, running things andstamping the shop withtheir hip, girlie styles andsensibilities. “I was toldnot to buy without my daughter Jenny’s approval,”laughed Kim, though she’squick to add that she wearsGirlie Girl’s trendy, con-temporary clothing andaccessories herself.“We’ve had fun exper-imenting with differentdesigners and lines to meetthe desires of our clien-tele,” said the owners.With a wide assort-ment of designer jeans forevery fit, dresses for every occasion, and tops andcoats from comfy casual tocosmo to dressy, GirlieGirls can dress you in style.And, if you are look-ing for accessories, look nofurther. This little store hasit all, in every color. Fer-ndale has never had a storequite like this, claim theowners, whose family haslived in Ferndale for gen-erations.“We are truly enjoyingbeing part of the businesscommunity of Ferndale,”they say. “Count on us tokeep a close eye on the lat-est fashions and bringthem to our town.”Come in to see what isnew at Girlie Girls. Witha new exciting line of jew-elry, the “coveted” 501Levi’s and a full line of contemporary men’s cloth-ing, Laurel and Kim areworking to keep Ferndalein style. You don’t want tomiss this!
 
IRL 
 
IE GIRLS 444 Main St 
 
 
eet Tel. 7 
 
 
7/7 
 
 
6-
 
4544 
 
For five years the Shophas been honored by NICHE magazine as oneof the Top Retailers of American Craft. The cri-teria for receiving theseawards, which are deter-mined by polling over26,000 professional craftartists, include treatingartists with respect, givingback to the craft commu-nity and mentoring emerg-ing artists.According to Black-smith Shop owner, andblacksmith himself, JosephKoches, these ideals havealways been central to hisbusiness practices.“I think of it as invest-ing in an artist,” Kochessaid. “If there is a youngblacksmith who showspotential, I like to helpthem out by buying theirpieces, so they can buy new tools or whatever they need to keep on going.Merchandise is purchasedfrom artists who love whatthey are doing. They puttheir love into their work and one can see the differ-ence.”Indeed the difference is visible to the numerouscustomers impressed withthe unique, quality prod-ucts. As the popularity of the store continues toexpand, the shop hasgrown by launching a web-site (www.ferndaleblack-smith.com) that allows visual communicationwith the merchandise.Amidst updating thebusiness and planning forthe future, the BlacksmithShop will always stay trueto its beginnings – sellingan extensive selection of beautiful hand-made prod-ucts by talented artists.The histories of thebuildings that currently contain the BlacksmithShop only add to theatmosphere of craftsman-ship.The 455 Main Streetshop in Ferndale was orig-inally the G.W. Williamsbuilding and housed ahardware store upon itscompletion in 1888.The same people beganbuilding the 491 MainStreet gallery in 1895 whentheir hardware storeneeded a larger space. Thestore at 455 has seen somechanges, as it was damagedin the 1902 earthquake, wasmodified in 1954, and wasdamaged again in the 1992earthquake, at which pointJoseph Koches remodeledthe building to look like theoriginal storefront.Through all these changes,the store at 455 Main stillhas its original wood floors,giving an old-time flavorthat is heightened by the1914 cash register made by the National Cash RegisterCompany in Dayton, Ohio,some antique display cases,and a “whiz” machine forhand-written receipts.Visiting the BlacksmithShop will not only exposeyou to beautiful hand-made artwork by Americanartists, but you are sure tosee something made inmetal that you have neverseen before. The Black-smith Shop is open sevendays a week. The staff hasgift certificates availableand can ship all over theU.S. Make the BlacksmithShop a definite stop onyour way down MainStreet.
THE BLACKSMITH SHOP THE BLACKSMITH SHOP GALLERY 455 Main Str 
 
eet, Fer 
 
ndale 491 Main Str 
 
 
et, Fer 
 
ndale 
 
 
l. 7 
 
07/ 
 
 
86-4216 Fax 
 
: 707/ 
 
786-4516 
 
erndal 
 
 
bla
 
ck 
 
smith.c 
 
om 

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