Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Small Arms Survey - Oct 2011

Small Arms Survey - Oct 2011

Ratings: (0)|Views: 13|Likes:
Published by aynoneemouse
The Small Arms Survey serves as the principal international source of public information on all aspects of small arms and armed violence, and as a resource centre for governments, policy-makers, researchers, and activists. The Survey distributes its findings through Occasional Papers, Issue Briefs, Working Papers, Special Reports, Books, and its annual flagship publication, the Small Arms Survey. The project has an international staff with expertise in security studies, political science, international public policy, law, economics, development studies, conflict resolution, sociology and criminology, and works closely with a worldwide network of researchers and
partners. The Small Arms Survey is a project of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. For more information see http://www.smallarmssurvey.org
Publication date: October 2011
The Small Arms Survey serves as the principal international source of public information on all aspects of small arms and armed violence, and as a resource centre for governments, policy-makers, researchers, and activists. The Survey distributes its findings through Occasional Papers, Issue Briefs, Working Papers, Special Reports, Books, and its annual flagship publication, the Small Arms Survey. The project has an international staff with expertise in security studies, political science, international public policy, law, economics, development studies, conflict resolution, sociology and criminology, and works closely with a worldwide network of researchers and
partners. The Small Arms Survey is a project of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. For more information see http://www.smallarmssurvey.org
Publication date: October 2011

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: aynoneemouse on Apr 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/06/2015

pdf

text

original

 
   R  e  s  e  a  r  c   h
     N    o    t    e    s
T
he Small Arms Survey estimates theannual authorized trade in ‘small arms’
1
 to exceed USD
7
billion a year (SmallArms Survey,
2011
, p.
9
).
2
A lack o transparencyon the part o many states and diculties odisaggregating data on transers that somestates do report create numerous challengesor the study o this activity. Lists o the mostactive countries tend to be skewed toward thosethat are more transparent or cater to large civil-ian markets. Nonetheless, sucient data andexpertise exist to allow or broad assessmentsto be made about the trade in small arms. This
Research Note
assesses the countries that exportthe greatest value o small arms. It does notocus on volumes o materiel or a transer’seect on peace and security.States report on their arms transers veryunevenly. Some are very transparent, whileothers are secretive. Sometimes countries viewtransers o small arms as ‘aid’, ‘gits’, or ‘secu-rity assistance’ or which no payment is madeor customs ees levied. These transers tendnot to appear in open records. Nevertheless,customs data is an especially important sourceo data,
3
as are countries’ national arms exportreports and submissions to the UN Registero Conventional Arms (UNROCA).
4
The newsmedia as well as research and advocacy organ-izations also help shed light on this activity.The Survey has supplemented these sources bycontacting governments and industry ocialsdirectly, some o whom have provided inorma-tion not otherwise available.The rankings provided here tend to capturemore accurately the activities o those countriesthat are more orthcoming in publicly record-ing their exports. Moreover, the dollar valueso countries’ exports are, generally speaking,
under
estimates. For example, it is not possible
Small Arms Transfers:Exporting States
    N    U    M    B    E    R     1    1
        •
     O    C    T    O    B    E    R     2    0    1    1
Small Arms Survey Research Notes
Number 11
October 2011
1
    W    E    A    P    O    N    S    &    M    A    R    K    E    T    S
to disaggregate data that some states reporton transers o particularly expensive weaponssystems such as man-portable air deence sys-tems and anti-tank guided weapons, as well asmateriel traded in large volumes such as muni-tions or mortars. Such export gures are otenconfated with larger missile systems or conven-tional artillery systems and munitions (SmallArms Survey,
2011
, pp.
12
13
). Accordingly, thelist o countries in Table
1
below relies heavilyon—but is not limited to—customs data. Thetranser o technology (including licensedproduction), in which the percentages o com-ponents and their values produced locally ortranserred rom abroad are not made publicor change over time, also creates challenges.The values o declared deliveries can diersignicantly rom licences granted (Weber andBromley,
2011
, pp.
3
5
), urther obuscating analready murky picture.That said, at least
16
countries have exportedmore than USD
100
million worth o small armsin a single calendar year since
2001
. Analysisthrough
2008
5
indicates that the country withthe largest recorded exports is the United States(which transerred at least USD
700
millionin small arms in
2008
), ollowed by Italy andGermany (which both exported more thanUSD
300
million in small arms annually overthe ve-year period
2004–08
). Other countriesreporting that they habitually export more thanUSD
100
million in small arms annually areAustria, Belgium, and Brazil. The Survey believes that China and the Russian Federationalso routinely export more than USD
100
mil-lion in small arms, although their own reportingis very limited.
6
An analysis o customs datasuggests that eight other countries—Canada,Israel, Norway, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland,Turkey, and the United Kingdom—have exported
Table 1
Exporters of small arms, 2001–08 (estimated annual average value)
CategoryValue(USD million)States (listed alphabetically in each row)
TopexportersTier 1500+
1:
United StatesTier 2100499
7:
Austria, Belgium, Brazil, China, Germany, Italy, Russian FederationMajorexportersTier 35099
13:
Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Israel, Japan, Norway, South Korea, Spain,Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United KingdomTier 41049
18:
 Bulgaria, Croatia, India, Iran, Mexico, Netherlands, North Korea, Pakistan, Poland, Portugal,Romania, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Taiwan, Ukraine
Note:
At least ten countries have exported USD 10 million or more in small arms in a single calendar year between 2001 and 2008, but exported
on average
less than USD10 million annually during this period: Argentina, Australia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cyprus, Denmark, Hungary, Montenegro, the Philippines, Thailand, and the United ArabEmirates (UAE).
Sources:
Small Arms Survey (2004; 2005; 2006; 2007; 2008; 2009; 2010; 2011; including online annexes available at <http://www.smallarmssurvey.org>); and author’s interviews.

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->