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P. 1
Australian Ghosts

Australian Ghosts

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Sydney Morning Herald 1863 (Sept 29)
Sydney Morning Herald 1863 (Sept 29)

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The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 29 September 1863, page 3National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13087814
GHOSTS
IN
AUSTRALIA.
I
Inthespringof
185-,
I
was
employed
in
driving
a
numerous
herdof
store-cattle
fromNew
England
down
into
the
Melbourne
country.The
grass
was
plentiful,
andthe
cattletravelled
along
at
theirleisure
across
thewideplainswhich
lie
betweentheLachlan,
Murrumbidgee,
and
Edward
Rivers,It
was
nearly
sunset
ona
fine
eveningin
August
when
wecame
to
Deniliquin,wherethecrossing
-
placeofthelaBt-named
river
is
situated
;
and
drivingthe
cattle
down
into
an
ongleofthe
Edward,
we
camped
closeto
the
footof
ihe
sandhill
on
whichthetownship
is
built.
There
were
two
cr
thn
e
otherherds
ofcattleand
some
flocksof
sheepwaiting
to
cross
in
themorning,and
as_
several
i,f
the
men
in
chargeofthem
went
up
to
BillyM'lntyre'spublic-houFe,andthen
came
down
to
our
camp-fire,
there
was
toon
a
pretty
large
crowdof
bushmen
assembledround
it.
Some
"of
themhadbrought
bottles
of
rum
fromthe
inn,and
as
thegrog
iiculated
we
began
to
discussthevarious
routes
by
which
we
had
traveller).
There
was
a
longargument
asto
thebesttrack
across
theOldManPlain
;
but,
as
almost
all
of
uswere
infavour
of
that
byLang's
Crossing-place,thatpoint
was
almost
settled,
when
i>n
Australianstockm
cn
named
Driscollstartedwhat
heseemed
to
consider
an
unanswerable
objection,
by
at
k11
gus,
how
we
would
av<
id
tte
Black
¡swampand
the
ghOM
of
tie
"
trcttinn
c<b?"Trisspeech
wbbre
ecrvedwith
arojr
cf
)aurhter,but
Dr
seli
jumped
up
ina
nige,and
Bt-id
'
xon
may
la
igh
asmuonis
jeulike,
bujs
,
but
bbsureus
1
am
Hu
dm,?
here,I
baw
it
m-vtelf
WLrtC
luck
itid
seen
y'abeh«-ving
'
Of
course,
wl
cn
we
heard
ihi6,
wewere
all
anxious
to
hearthe
story,andbj
tie
aid
of
ali
ile
judicuus
flat
trj
ai
d
a
panniku,
ofgreg,
wesuccee
lea
in
appealing
Diiscoll'epssion,andprevailing
on
him
totell
us
his
idventuri,
which
hedid
111
tbe
followingwoids
"
Yc-urcaily
all
knowW
an
abadgcry
Stati
n
above
WaggaWagga
Well,
two
yeaisago,Bill
Kelly
andI
took
three
hundred
fatbeaitu
fromlhere
to
fetch
11
to
Bendigo
The
leed
was
good,and
wecame
dewntheriver-bank
till
we
reached
Lin¿'s,where
we
crossed
the
canle
It
was
lat"
in
theafter
1oenw
hen
we
got
out
on
theplain
,
andthe
sunwas
jm>tdipping
aswewere
abreastottheBack
S
*
amp
,
towe
rounded
up
the
cuttle,
at
d
detetmined
tostop
there
forthe
nightWehobbled
our1
orses
close
at
hand,
ht
ourfire,
endhad
our
tuppers
Then
we
agreedthatIshouldtake
the
first
watch
,
so
Kelly
rolled
himself
up
in
his
'ptsBum-rug,
and
I
wentdo
*n
to
have
a
look
atthecattleandhorses
Ifound
I
them
all
right,
so
I
went
back
to
the
fire,
heaped
on
fiethfuel,
andthenstretched
mjself
down
tohive
a
comfortable
erxoke
I
was
pretty
tiredwith
riding
all
day,
and
the
fire
was
hot,
soina
short
time
I
dosed
off
1must
have
sleptthree
or
four
hourr,
for
thecoldawoke
me,
aB
the
fire
was
very
low
,
so
Igotupandput
on
more
wood,
andthenI
thought
I'd
just
go
Tout
d
the
cattlebeforeI
wakedKelly
totakehiswatchSo
I
caught
andeaddled
mymare,androde
away
to
the
cattlecampThe
moon
wasat
the
full,
ai
d
shining
brightly,
and
thebeasts
lud
drawn
out
on
the
plain
to
letd
,
so
of
course
Istarted
to
head
them
back,I
was
ciinte
ing
along
when
all
of
a
Buddtntheleading
cattle
carne
gallopingback,and
as
theywheeled,
aman
passed
close
to
me,riding
a
baldfeccd
cob,and
comingfrom
theoipoBite
duection
Now,
Ktlly'shcrse
was
bald
faced,sol
thought
that
he
hadwttked
up
and
come
faced,sol
thought
that
he
wttked
up
and
come
out
to
lock
afterme,
so
Irode
on
towardsthe
camp
^hen
I
get
there,
to
my
great
emprise
I
eaw
Kelly
ljingquite
snugly
rolledup
11
hisrug,and
apparently
fastash
epThis
'very
naturallyyexed
me,
so
Ishojkhim
roughly,and
whenhe
sat
up,says
I
to
him
'Kelly,whatdo
you
mean
by
goingand
lyingdownogam,whenyou
know
it's
your
watch
r'
"Lying
downagain?
'
repliedhe
"Why,
I
never
weke
at
alltill
now
"
|
"
What
'
"
cried
I,
*
doyou
want
to
denythatyoupassed
me
just
now
out
on
the
plainheadingback
thecattle
?
Ididnot
see
yourface,
butI
saw
the
bidfaceof
Dandy
plain
enough
"
At
that,
Kelly
jumped
up
as
if
he
was
shot"Saddle
up,for
your
life,
Dnscoll,"
saidhe,
"
and
let
us
beoff
_ou've
seen
the
ghost
of
the
trottingcob,and
we'rebothdead
men
"
Well,
we
jumped
onour
hoises
,
and
bydaybreak
we
hadgot
as
far
es
Brodenp's
btaion,andnext
night
we
camped
just
where
wenow
are,butthat
very
trip,
Kelly
was
drowned
m
the
Campaspe,
and
1
breketwo
ribsand
m
jcollarboneSoIfor
one
would
tooner
go
a
hundredmilesround
thancampagain
near
the
Black
Swamp,
and
chanceseeingtheghtstofthetrottingcob
'
V,
hen
Driscoll
had
finished,
the
conversa
ion
natur-allyturned
on.&ppantions,and
'
Fi&her'sGhost
"
was
tiiumphantlyquoted
as
an
unanswerable
aigument
m
the
r
lavour
,
but
there
were
still
several
wau
laugned
at
iheideaofEuch
thingsAt
last
a
bullock
driver
frcmthe
Sydney
side
said
"
lhere
are
ghosts,
there
sno
derjmg,
and111
tell
youof
one
that
hundredsheardabout,
andmany
of*
you
knowthe
min
who
sawit,
andyou
can
ask
himselfabout
it
Many
«f
youhavebeen
,up
the
Murray
towardsAlbury,and
Íave
parsedBrown
s
station,
justaboveQuartQuertWell,whenI
wasa
Government-man,
I
was
doing
ttv
time
rear
Camden,
and
ia
those
day*Biown
had
a
farmat
theCow
pastures,close
to
where
I
was
living
He
hadjustsettled
down
onthe
Murray
with
a
fewhundredhead
of
cattle,
andstopped
therefive
orfix
months,putiing
uphuts
and
yards,
andbreaking
m
thecattle
to
the
run
,
so
whenhe
thought
everything
was
going
on
well,hestartedtordowncountry,
intending
to
bung
up
more
ttock
ina
short
time
He
travelled
on
horseback,
for
there
were
no
mail-couches
to
the
Murray
then,and
as
he
pushed
on
prettysharp,he
was
verytired
when
he
got
to
MjitleCreekHe
told
Thompson,
the
landlord,
to
callhim
early
in
the
morning,
tookhis
supper,
an
itwo
or
three
glassesofrum,andthen
went
to
bedTowardsmorning,something
awoke»
him,andwhenhe
opened
his
eyeshe
faw
hi»
wifestanding
by
thebedtideBefore
he
couldspeak
tone-r,
she
told
him"toget
up,"and
wentout
ofthe
room
at
once
Well,Brown
wsB
greatly
aurfrised,ef
c
urse,at
se
ing
her
at
that
place,
buthethoughtthat
shehad
come
to
meet
him,
bo
hegot
upand
dressed
himself
When
he
went
down,
he
lojked
in
thep.rlours
,
but
as
hecould
not
see
her,he
began
tocallouther
name.
At
lostthe
noise
he
made
roused
up
thelandlord,
andhe
came
and
asked
whatthe
matter
was
"ASby,"sajB
Brown,
'
Iwantmy
wifeShe's
come
and
waked
mp,and
new
she'shidherself
"
"You
re
dreaming,
man,"tried
thelandlord"How
can
y
our
wifebehere
»
Youknow
she's
at
tue
Cowpas
tuie
Farm
"
"What,"
rejoined
Btoun
,
"doyou
mean
to
say
that
shedid
notcome
here
since
I
wentto
bed
>
"
'
Of
course
shedidu
t,
repliedihe
landlord,
"
f
w
Ilockrdthe
door
when
I
wentto
bed,andthe
key
is
undermypillow
'
"
W
ith
thatBrown
grewquite
frightened
'
Saddle
 
"
W
ith
thatBrown
grewquite
frightened
'
Saddle
ny
hone
at
one,'saidhe,
'for
sosure
as
I'm
a
living
mon,my
wife
came
ard
speke
to
me
to
light,and
Im
greatlyafiaid
that
tometbmg
has
happened
to
her
it
humeWith
that,hemounted
and
gi-llopedoff
He
r
de
till
heknocked
uphishorse,
ai
dihen
he
bonowed
a
fresh
one,and
kept
on
as
fast
88
hecould
ride,
so
thatbefore
sunset
he
esme
close
to
theCowpasturt.
TermAs
heguiloped
up,
he
could
fee
there
was
somethirgunusual
gungon,for
ec
vc
ral
1otFeswere
fastemd
to
the
posts
of
theverandah,the
working
menwere
stat
ding
m
groups,
at
the
dOvTs
of
the
r
huts,
ana
two
or
three
troopers
were
louDging
about
near
thestockyardBrown
jumped
offhishorse,and
was
going
atonce
intohis
louee,
tut
one
ofhis
neighbours
caine
out
and
met1
imat
thedoorThis
gertleman
ledhimawaj
to
a
littledifatance,
and
told
him
as
gradually
as
becouldwhathedtokenplace
Now,
boys,Brown
was
a
good
mastertohis
assigned
servants,
but
hiswife
was
a
tyrant,and
whilehe
was
at
the
Murray,
she
had
beenstoppingthe
rationscf
the
Government
men,
endBendingthemup
tocourt
There
wasonemanin
particular
sVe
took
a
gréa'disliketo,
hetoulddonothing
right,
andalmostevrj
Monday
norninghegot
bia
fifty
lasl
es
at
the
nearest
court-
houseAt
la
t,
hegotdesperateHe
was
chopping
borne
wood,
when
she
came
up
to
him,
andafter
abusinghim,
said
"
111get
you
fifty
more
on
Mon-
day
next
'
"Imaygetthe
fifty
cried,criedhe,
"
but
you
11
notliveto
know
of
it,"
andwiththathe
lifted
the
sxe
hehad
in
his
hand,
andsplit
herskullThis
happened
atthe
Cow-pastures
atthe
very
hour
whenshe
wasseen
by
Brown
m
the
inn
at
MyrtleCietk
,
so
you
see,
bojs,
there
can
be
no
doubt
butg1Ottsdo
i
ometimes
appear
on
earth
""
Of
course,there
sno
doubt
at
all
aboutthît,"
said
en
oldshepherd,
who
hadjust
come
up
to
thecamp,
forI
was
closeto
one
myself,andmy
mate
sawit
quite
plainly,
and
as
itwasa
quarething,
111
tell
j
e?
all
about
it
You
that
are
fromthe
Sydney
sidemustrecollect
the
time
whenthe
fireswere
seen
e"ver>
night
on
King
b
Plains,
near
Bathurst,andhow
eil
the
people
wentcut
to
see
them,andthe
priesttriedtolaythe
epmtAllthat
was
told
in
theBathuistpapers,butI
nt-\er
told
any
one
tillnow
what
happened
to
RedJackand
me
there
You
see,
I'dbeenshepherding
at
Wargoola,
near
Carcoar,andwhenthe{hearing
was
over,I
gotanother
man
to
takemy
flockior
a
bit,
aDd
wentinto
Bathurst
to
buy
some
things
and
have
a
spreeWell,
ofcourse,
ina
fewdays,
I'd
very
near
spentmycheque,
and
as
I
was
justthinking
of
making
a
start,
I
fell
inwithliedJack.He
was
an
old
maie
of
mine,
and
he'dbeendown
intownfor
some
weeks,
so
you
may
be
sure
hehad
'
pockets
tolet,'
He
was
looking
for
a
job
;
so
I
toldhim
tocome
on
with
me
to
Wargoola,
and
he'dbe
sure
of
employment,
for
theywanted
some
hands
on
the
s'ation.
Jacksaid
'
he
was
glad
of
thechance
;'
to
he
rolled
up
his
blankets
;
Igot
mytraps
and
a
couple
ofbottlesforthe
road,
andaway
we
went
out
ofBathurst.We
had_been
nol'blerisitjg
aboutthepublic-houses,and
we
"wereboinpretty
fresh
when
we
statted
¡
60
we
walkedalcng
verygaily,
and
never
took
any
notice
ofthetime
till
it
began
to
eriw
du>-k,
andthen
we
found
we
were
ccrjing
on
to
King'sPlains.
We
lookedabout
for
a
good
can,
ping-]lace
aswe
walked
on;
andjust
asit
grew
dtirk,
we
saw
the
lightof
a
large
fire
away
to
the
right,
andthenanother,
and
another.
'
Come
on,'said
Jack;
'we're
all
right
now
;
there's
some
cverlanders
there
with
cattle,
and
we'llgo
down
totheir
cemp.'"Withthat
we
turnedin"Withthat
we
turnedin
off
theroad,and
went
towardsthe
nearest
fire;;
butwhen
we
got
to
it,
there
wesnoone
there.
Wecooeed,but"
there
wasnoanswer
;
bowe
pushed
for
thenext,thinking
the
men
might
have
shiftedtheir
camp.Well,
when
we
got
to
it,
there
was
no
one
there
either
;
andthen
all
of
a
suddenI
recollected
whatIhadheardthem
f
peaking
ot
m
Bathurst,
so
1toldJakof
it,
and
toldhimwe'dbelter
(¿et
away
at
ouee
,
buthe
onlylaughi
dat
thethoughts
of
a
spirit
Well,
we
lit
our
j.ipts,
end
had
a
gooo
stiff
gla
s
ap
ece
out
of
one
ol
t)e
1
otiles,
andthen
Jaik
Soldhedgoand
have
ale
ok
f
rt)e
ghosr,and
1e
i.eke'1
m
ifI
was
game
to
gowuhh
m
Well,
1didn'tlike
to
back
out,
so
off
y\ewent
towardsthenext
fire,
aid
when
we
came
i
earit,we
<ould
s.eesomeone
moving
aboutand
piling
on
wood'There'cyourgin
sttor
you,'says
Jnek'Hollo,
mate,willyi
u
have
a
j,lasB
}'
Bat
ti
e,
figure
kept
on
at
the
hr>-,
and
nude-
i
oanswer.
By
tiintinewe
had
got
tju
te
cose
to
the
fire,
and
asu
blamed
up
wesaw
quite
plainly
thefiguieof
a
man,bulhe
hud
co
head
on
his
shoulders-nothing
but
a
Hood
stan
edstump
of
a
neck,
ind
yet
he
was
going
at
cut
quitecontentedlyfeeding
thehreI
thought
I'dhave
dropped,butJack
said
'Cme
on,
we'll
giab
lim,
ghost
ox
no
ghi
se'
Then
heputthebe
ttlelo
hi«
mouth,
and
took
a
long
drink
,
Itoole
ai
other,
ai
dthenJack
ran
roundthe
fire
one
way,
ai
dI
ranaro
her.
As
we
(,ot
to
theother
s
de,
we
could
tee
theHeadless
Shepherd
standingbetween
ue.
'
1luve)»ui
ow,'
cried
Jack,and
triedto
lay
holdofhimIdinthesame,buthe
slipped
through
cur
fingers,and
we
caughtonly
ore
another,anddown
we
fell,
and
when
wecarne
toourselves,the
sunwas
shiningoverhead,
and
nothing
remained
oftheghi
st
except
thewoodashes
at
thedifferent
fires.
Jack
andI
went
on
toWa
goola
,
butwhat
becameof
the
ghost
1
don't
know,
ab
1
went
down
to
theDarling
Beoii
after
"
Ihis
storystartedthe
disputeabout
spirits
afresh.,
for
there
weresome
"ne»chums"présent
whohad
never
readibe
Bathurstpaper*
of
theperiod,andthey
saidthat
Kum
wts
the
on
ysp
ni
that
BedJackand
his
mate
had
Beenon
King'sPlains
Hrwever,
the
"
eld
hands
"
would
not
lisien
to
this,andthe
dispute
began
to
grow
furiousAt
last,
Jim
Ryan,
an.
Irish
native,
roared
out
ma
rags-
"
It'smybelief
ye're
no
betterthsn
baythens
,
andthe
next
thingyou'll
dowill
be
to
deny
the
'
CooeeHut
''
"
lhia
waa
evidtnly
corsidered
a
cinclusive
argumentby
all
theold
bushmen,
and
theiropponent»
werecom-
pelled
to
confess
theirignjranceofthe
Cuo-e
Hut,
and
to
abkfoi
anaccour
tof
it
Tor
a
Bhort
time,Jim
Byan
refused
to
satisfy
them,
but
at
laft
heallowed
hittBelf
to
be
"
The
hut
we
callthe
Cooee
or
Mendering
Hut
is
out
on
theYarekoCreek,
at
the
hack
ofGoreeRun
¡
and
the
way
it
gutthat
namewas
this
:
Atthe
time
whentheBilliloijg
andYanko
were
first
settled
on,
there
wasanan
named
Bi1
Whi'e
employed
at
Goree
Staticn.
He
wasan
emigrant,andh«d
not
been
long
inthe
colony,
so
theyused
to
keep
himaboutthehome
Btatii.n
chopping
wood
and
caning
water,andhelping
upatthe
draughting-yardsoccasion-
ally.>\
eil,it
happened
that
one
ofthe
shepherds
had
a
row
with
theoverseer,
and
g
it
discoarged
at
once
;
so,
as
theyhud
noone
else
handy,
they
determined
to
eend
Bill
Whiteshepherding
till
they
couldgetanother
man.
Thehut
is
twtnty-five
mi.esbackfromGoree
;
so
the
overseer
wentout
him-
self
Rith
Billandthe
sheep,
andtuen
stopped
a
day

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