Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Teachable Moments Pedagogical Considerations in Teaching Public Archaeology at the Graduate Level

Teachable Moments Pedagogical Considerations in Teaching Public Archaeology at the Graduate Level

Ratings: (0)|Views: 315|Likes:
Published by Nicolas Laracuente
A paper to be presented at the 2012 Society for American Archaeology Conference #SAA2012. Comments that are made on this document will be shared with the authors and will be contributed for discussion during the electronic symposium Lessons from the Trenches: The Pedagogy of Archaeology and Heritage that takes place in the Chickasaw Room at 10am Saturday (4/21/2012) morning.
A paper to be presented at the 2012 Society for American Archaeology Conference #SAA2012. Comments that are made on this document will be shared with the authors and will be contributed for discussion during the electronic symposium Lessons from the Trenches: The Pedagogy of Archaeology and Heritage that takes place in the Chickasaw Room at 10am Saturday (4/21/2012) morning.

More info:

categoriesTypes, Research, History
Published by: Nicolas Laracuente on Apr 16, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

04/16/2012

pdf

text

original

 
1
Teachable Moments: Pedagogical Considerations in Teaching Public Archaeology at the GraduateLevel
ByA. Gwynn HendersonKentucky Archaeological SurveyandNicolas R. LaracuenteKentucky Heritage Council/University of Kentucky Department of AnthropologyPaper prepared for
Lessons from the Trenches: The Pedagogy of Archaeology and Heritage
Electronic symposium at the77
th
Annual Meeting of the Society for American ArchaeologyApril 18-22, 2012,Memphis, TNCo-organizers: Susan Bender and Phyllis Messenger
 
2
Abstract
The profession has
a responsibility to prepare today’s graduate students to succeed in both academic and
applied realms. Effectively working with and
communicating with our various “
public
s”
has become askill set as important as excavating and conducting research. This paper assesses a public archaeologygraduate seminar taught in the Spring of 2010, by its instructor and a student who took the class. Frominsights gleaned through a consideration of student course evaluations and informal interviews withinstructors and students who have taught/taken similar courses, we highlight issues to consider whenteaching a public archaeology course and offer suggestions of ways to improve pedagogy.
Introduction
The role of archaeology has changed over the last few decades, bringing more archaeologists out of theirfields and labs and into the public sphere (Nassaney 2009:4-5). Archaeology is used to highlight thedisenfranchised in highly public and politicized situations (e.g., Little 2007).Archaeologists take on causes (e.g., Stottman et al. 2010). Even archaeologists who begin their careersnot explicitly intending to engage the public will end up needing to explain their work to interested partiesor the media.These day-to-day work experiences increasingly require archaeologists to engage with multiple publics ina meaningful and informed way. Experience in and awareness of public archaeology issues and methodsmight better prepare graduates for real-world employment opportunities, with experience in publicarchaeology serving as a way for students to diversify and broaden their employment options. A largebody of archaeological literature exists on public archaeology that is untapped by standard archaeologycurricula, resulting in beginning archaeologists making the same mistakes as their predecessors when they
engage the public. Recognizing this, the SAA’s recommendations for teaching archaeology in the twenty
-first century place a premium on real-life experiential learning and on making courses relevant to realworld situations (Bender and Smith 2000).Compared to the required core courses and electives that make up the curriculum offered by anthropologydepartments today, courses in public archaeology are relatively new. In the 1970s, with the beginnings of widespread archaeological work required by Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act andother subsequent legislation and the publication of 
Public Archaeology
(McGimsey 1972), publicarchaeology was generally synonymous with CRM, and public archaeology courses reflected thatperspective.Since then, the definition, identity, and meaning of public archaeology has broadened as archaeology haschanged (Jameson 2004; McDavid 2009, Smardz Frost 2004). Not surprisingly, the content of public
 
3
archaeology courses has changed accordingly. In addition to (or sometimes in lieu of) considering CRM,the National Register of Historic Places, Section 106, and modeling how to respond to RFPs, publicarchaeology courses consider writing for the public, interpretation, ethics, media, museums, working withdescendent groups, working with communities, the worldwide antiquities trade and looting, learningtheory. The list can go on and on and covers almost too much for a one-semester course.In this paper, in our two voices (alone and together), we reflect on a graduate seminar in publicarchaeology developed and taught by Henderson (a first-time graduate seminar instructor with decades of public archaeology experience) and taken by Laracuente (a second-semester archaeology doctoral studentwith some experience in public archaeology). We begin by briefly describing the main elements of thecourse (its goals and components), then present our perspectives on why Henderson taught/Laracuentetook the course, and our opinions concerning what went well and what needed improvement.Next, taking advantage of the teachable moment provided by student course evaluations, we consider andattempt to explain the bimodal assessment results. Using our course experience, informed byconversations with others (instructors and students) who teach and take public archaeology courses insomewhat similar contexts, we offer pedagogical suggestions and issues to consider when teaching publicarchaeology. Finally, employing the 3-2-1 Strategy, an effective teaching tool used during our course tofocus student reading (Zygouris-Coe et al. 2004), we offer our respective 3 Insights - 2 New Ideasgenerated by this experience, and pose our -1 Question to guide us (and perhaps others) in future publicarchaeology instruction endeavors.
Our Course
In the spring of 2009, the University of Kentucky, Department of Anthropology
’s Archaeology
Development Committee gave Henderson the go-ahead to develop a graduate seminar course in public
archaeology. Offered as “Seminar in Public Anthropology,” this course is
conceived of as one of a pair of occasional special-topic public anthropology seminar offerings. Graduate students with a strong interestin conveying academic information to the general public are the target audience, and those who take bothcourses can gain a deep and broad exposure to the issues and the methods of doinganthropology/archaeology in the public sphere.The main focus of our course is pedagogical: on how people learn, and the methods and techniques usedin oral and written communication with the public. It is structured to provide students hands-on authentic

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->