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Wayne Crews Testimony April 2012 Gov't Role in Investment - Water Desalination

Wayne Crews Testimony April 2012 Gov't Role in Investment - Water Desalination

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Water availability is a core infrastructure concern; today, that specific legislative concern is over what a federal role in water desalination should be. CEI’s view is that policymakers should strive to increasingly subject water policy decisions and investment to the pressures of the marketplace.
Water availability is a core infrastructure concern; today, that specific legislative concern is over what a federal role in water desalination should be. CEI’s view is that policymakers should strive to increasingly subject water policy decisions and investment to the pressures of the marketplace.

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Published by: Competitive Enterprise Institute on Apr 16, 2012
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 Testimony of:Wayne CrewsVice President for Policy/Director of Technology StudiesCompetitive Enterprise InstituteBefore the:Subcommittee on Water and PowerU.S. House of Representatives2321 Rayburn House Office BuildingWashington, D.C. 20515Legislative Hearing on the
 Reauthorization of Water Desalination Act of 2011
 Tuesday, April 17, 20122:00 PM1324 Longworth House Office Building
The Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) is a non-profit public policy researchorganization dedicated to advancing individual liberty and free enterprise with anemphasis on regulatory policy. We appreciate the opportunity to discuss issuessurrounding innovation and research in water policy as an element of broader science andmanufacturing policy.CEI maintains that competitive approaches to infrastructure and the technologiesunderlying it will be more effective than political interventions at boosting innovation,enhancing consumer well-being, facilitating commerce and trade, and contributing toprosperity for the United States.
Separation of State and Water
Water availability is a core infrastructure concern; today, that specific legislative concern
is over what a federal role in water desalination should be. CEI’s view is that
policymakers should strive to increasingly subject water policy decisions and investmentto the pressures of the marketplace.
Unneeded Spending
 
2The bill at issue, H.R. 2664, to reauthorize the Water Desalination Act of 1996,
1
wouldreauthorize $2 million annually through 2016 for water desalination projects at theDepartment of the Interior. Specifically:
The Secretary of the Interior hall operate, manage and maintain facilities to carry outresearch, development, and demonstration activities to develop technologies andmethods that promote brackish groundwater desalination as a viable method toincrease water supply in a cost-effective manner.
Granted, it’s not a lot of money. But America’s economy is faced not with just scarcity of 
water, but scarcity of funds. Perhaps even more importantly, federal spending
s effectsreverberate beyond the dollars.
 Redundant Research
Opponents see the bill as financially redundant because private sector research dollars faroutstrip the proposed outlays. Moreover, government research has been underway sincethe World War II era (on what is actually an ancient method of treating water), onmembrane improvement, energy reduction,
treatment of desalination’s waste brine
andmore. In markets, research is itself competitive, driven by reaction to consumer needs and
to what rivals do. In H.R. 2664, competition and rivalry isn’t part of the vision, making
both the goal of and methods to achieve desalination suspect.
 Redundant Education
Also redundant with readily available resources and ongoing operations would be H.R.2664
 proposed “outreach program to educate the public.” Policymakers need not and
ought not advocate for specific technologies since subsides are not merely unneeded, theycan be unfair, with only certain states involved yet all required to pay. Nor is it facetiousto note that the Internet enables any education sought, and is free.
 Misguided Renewables Provisions
Provisions emphasizing renewable energy use and investigations into mitigatingdesalination's own potential negative environmental impacts control the proposed agenda,but among much else, true markets compel a polluter to internalize or treat waste streams.
 Federal Desalination Policy vs. Market Pricing Solutions
Desalination as highly promising on its own appropriate terms
; it’s
already crucial insome areas. Many appear to see it playing a growing role especially and obviously inselect areas near the oceans and where transport and other costs are low or made low bycomplementary infrastructure investment. It plays important roles globally given certaingeographical and political circumstances.
1
Library of Congress link for H.R. 2664: http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c112:H.R.2664.IH: 
 
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