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The Black Death and Its Effect on Fourteenth and Fifteenth Century Art

The Black Death and Its Effect on Fourteenth and Fifteenth Century Art

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Published by Miley
The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1348 and 1350. Although there were several competing theories as to the etiology of the Black Death, it has been conclusively proven via analysis of ancient DNA from plague victims in northern and southern Europe that the pathogen responsible is the Yersinia pestis bacterium.[1] Thought to have started in China, it travelled along the Silk Road and reached the Crimea by 1346.

From there it was probably carried by Oriental rat fleas living on the black rats that were regular passengers on merchant ships. It spread throughout the Mediterranean and Europe. The Black Death is estimated to have killed 30–60 percent of Europe's population,[2] reducing world population from an estimated 450 million to between 350 and 375 million in the 14th century. The aftermath of the plague created a series of religious, social and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. It took 150 years for Europe's population to recover. The plague returned at various times, killing more people, until it left Europe in the 19th century.
The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1348 and 1350. Although there were several competing theories as to the etiology of the Black Death, it has been conclusively proven via analysis of ancient DNA from plague victims in northern and southern Europe that the pathogen responsible is the Yersinia pestis bacterium.[1] Thought to have started in China, it travelled along the Silk Road and reached the Crimea by 1346.

From there it was probably carried by Oriental rat fleas living on the black rats that were regular passengers on merchant ships. It spread throughout the Mediterranean and Europe. The Black Death is estimated to have killed 30–60 percent of Europe's population,[2] reducing world population from an estimated 450 million to between 350 and 375 million in the 14th century. The aftermath of the plague created a series of religious, social and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. It took 150 years for Europe's population to recover. The plague returned at various times, killing more people, until it left Europe in the 19th century.

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Published by: Miley on Apr 17, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/24/2013

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THE BLACK DEATH AND ITS EFFECT ON FOURTEENTH-AND FIFTEENTH-CENTURY ART
A ThesisSubmitted to the Graduate Faculty of theLouisiana State University andAgricultural and Mechanical Collegein partial fulfillment of therequirements for the degree of Master of ArtsinThe School of ArtbyAnna L. DesOrmeauxB.A., Louisiana State University, 2004May 2007
 
 ii
 
To my parents, Johnny and Annette DesOrmeaux,who stressed the importance of a formal educationand supported me in every way.You are my most influential teachers.
 
 iii
Acknowledgments
I would like to thank Dr. Mark Zucker, my advisor with eagle eyes and a redsword, for his indispensable guidance on any day of the week. I also thank Drs. JustinWalsh, Marchita Mauck, and Kirsten Noreen, who have helped me greatly throughout myresearch with brilliant observations and suggestions. A special thanks to my sister Maryand my dear friend Corbin Cole Gill for their endless supplies of synonyms and all of their help.

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