Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Collaborative Public Management - O'Leary and Vij (ASPA Conf 2012)

Collaborative Public Management - O'Leary and Vij (ASPA Conf 2012)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 568 |Likes:
Published by John Kamensky
Drs. Rosemary O'Leary and Nidhi Vij, at the Maxwell School at Syracuse University, presented an intriguing overview of key issues facing the field of collaborative governance, at the 2012 annual conference of the American Society of Public Administration.
Drs. Rosemary O'Leary and Nidhi Vij, at the Maxwell School at Syracuse University, presented an intriguing overview of key issues facing the field of collaborative governance, at the 2012 annual conference of the American Society of Public Administration.

More info:

Published by: John Kamensky on Apr 17, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/10/2014

pdf

text

original

 
1
Collaborative Public Management:Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?
By Rosemary O’Leary and Nidhi Vij
 The Maxwell School of Syracuse University400 Eggers HallSyracuse, NY 13244315-443-4991Corresponding author:roleary@maxwell.syr.edu 
Bios
Rosemary O’Leary is Distinguished Professor and Phanstiel Chair in Strategic Management and
Leadership at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Her research concerns collaboration as amanagement strategy.Nidhi Vij is a Ph.D. candidate in Public Administration at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University.Her dissertation analyzes the use of collaboration as a management strategy among high level publicservants in the Indian government.
Abstract
This article analyzes where we have been in collaborative public management research and practice byfocusing on the most important issues, concepts and ideas in the literature today. The issues, conceptsand ideas are: (1) competing definitions of collaboration; (2) changes in the environment of public
management that have encouraged the growth of collaborative public management; (3) “thinkingDaVinci” – 
lateral thinking and interdisciplinarity; (4) the management challenges of working innetworks; (5) the paradox of balancing autonomy and interdependence; (6) factors to consider beforecollaborating; (7) the importance of the individual; (8) the shifting leadership challenge; (9)weaknesses in collaborative public management research; and (10) the missing link between theoryand practice. The authors conclude that the study and practice of collaborative public management isgenerally fragmented with low level of consensus. From a research perspective, it is a low paradigmfield. The authors close with a view to the future. To advance the study and practice of collaborativepublic management the authors urge (1) agreement on definitions of commonly used terms, beginning
with the term “collaboration;” (2)
agreement on pressing collaborative public management challengesand substantive research and practice questions; (3) more precise theoretical models of behavior; and(4) agreement on the measurement of relevant variables.
 
2
Collaborative Public Management:Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?
By Rosemary O’Leary and Nidhi Vij
 The Maxwell School of Syracuse UniversityWith the evolution from government to governance, public management scholars have givenrenewed attention to forms of organization that cross agency boundaries. This phenomenon has beenthe subject of an explosion of research in recent years. The new collaborative public managementscholarship responds in part to the growth of collaborations among public, private, and nonprofitorganizations; the context, environment, and constraints within which they work; the situation of thepublic manager in a network; the governance processes and decision rules collaborators use; the waysthey define their work, tasks, and goals; and their impact on public policy and the policy process. Thecollaborative public management literature uses a variety of sound bites to describe the importance of 
this phenomenon to our field. Sometimes, scholars talk about the public manager’s ‘toolkit
,
’ or ‘strategies.’ Sometimes, they talk about collaborative public management as an ‘option’ or a ‘choice.’
Sometimes, they refer to collaborative networks
as ‘model
s
’ or ‘structure
s
’ within which managersfind themselves. There is a tension between literature on a manager’s (or his/her organization’s)
individual choice to collaborate, contrasted with literature that looks at intentional or fortuitouscollaborative collective design.In this article we focus on collaborative public management, and more particularly, on what wethink are the most important issues, concepts and ideas in collaborative public management researchand practice today. Some issues, concepts, or ideas require great length to explore, while others may beexplained easily in a paragraph or two. Behind these issues, concepts and ideas is our belief that
 
3
academic work on collaboration has much to offer the world of practice. At the same time, we believethat practitioners have insights about collaboration that inform academic work.For the first two parts of this article, we focus on competing definitions of collaboration and thechanging environment of public management. Both ideas are important to practice and theory. Next,for parts three to eight, we focus on the world of the practitioner including what it means to be acollaborative thinker, on-the-ground challenges and paradoxes of collaborating, factors to considerbefore collaborating, new notions of collaborative leadership, and the skills and traits of the effectivecollaborator. Then, for parts nine and ten we reflect on some theoretical and research weaknesses andthe seeming disconnect between theory and practice. We close with predictions for the future.
 
 #1: Competing Definitions of Collaboration
Collaborative public management is an idea that resonates with many, yet the term
“collaboration”
lacks a common lens or definition; there are seemingly
“101 definitions of collaboration.”
Three examples from three different decades are provided here for illustrative purposes.Each is widely cited today. Gray (1989) defined interorganizational collaboration as an emergentprocess between interdependent organizational actors who negotiate the answers to shared concerns(pp. 12-13). Huxham (1996) defined collaboration as
“working in association with others for someform of mutual benefit” (p.
1).
Bardach (1998) defined collaboration as “any joint activity by two or 
more agencies working together that is intended to increase public value by their working together
rather than separately” (p. 8).
Accordingly, we were forced to make strategic choices as to how to define collaborative publicmanagement for the purposes of this article. Although scholars have developed additional definitions

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
Khairul Mahadi liked this
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
Ash Roughani liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->