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RapidVet H Prospect General

RapidVet H Prospect General

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Published by Dragos Cobzariu
(DEA 1.1 positive and DEA 1.1 negative)
Eight specific antigens have been identified on the surface of the canine erythrocytes. The internationally accepted canine blood group system, the "DEA" (Dog Erythrocyte
Antigen), is based on these antigens. It currently characterizes eight common blood groups, the antigens DEA 1.1, 1.2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.
DEA 1.1 and 1.2 are the most significant blood factors in the dog. Both are highly antigenic but DEA 1.1 is the primary lytic factor in canine transfusion medicine. Although each of
the blood group antigens is capable of stimu-lating formation of iso-antibodies, DEA 1.1 has the greatest stimulation potential. Thus most clinical reactions resulting from the
transfusion of incompatible cells occur when DEA 1.1 positive blood is given to a DEA 1.1 negative recipient.
Significant clinical reactions to DEA 1.2 may occur but are less severe than reactions to DEA 1.1. Dogs do not have iso-antibodies to incompatible blood groups and therefore the first incompatible transfusion is normally well tolerated.
Moreover, the development of antibodies due to sensitization as a result of transfusions with incompatible blood groups has to be evalua-ted in females of animals resulting from crossbreeding. Thus, puppies could develop isoerythrolysis and be susceptible to disease or even die because of haemolytic anaemia.
Blood typing is very important in veterinary practice in order to prevent the occurrence of serious pathologies due to the mixing of incompatible blood types in cats with A or B erythrocytes. Cats with B erythrocytes exhibit an immediate systemic anaphylactic reaction (hypotension, bradycardia, apnea, urination, defecation, vomiting, and severe neurological depression) and haemolytic signs (hemoglobinemia and hemoglobinuria) when transfused with Type A blood because of their natural high-titered anti-A antibody. Those cats with A erythrocytes and natural low-titered anti-B antibody will exhibit only a mild reaction when transfused with the B blood, but even this can make a difference in recovery rates in a medical situation since the transfused erythrocytes have a short life span. Neonatal isoerythrolysis can occur when there is blood group incompatibility between maternal and fetal blood.
(DEA 1.1 positive and DEA 1.1 negative)
Eight specific antigens have been identified on the surface of the canine erythrocytes. The internationally accepted canine blood group system, the "DEA" (Dog Erythrocyte
Antigen), is based on these antigens. It currently characterizes eight common blood groups, the antigens DEA 1.1, 1.2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.
DEA 1.1 and 1.2 are the most significant blood factors in the dog. Both are highly antigenic but DEA 1.1 is the primary lytic factor in canine transfusion medicine. Although each of
the blood group antigens is capable of stimu-lating formation of iso-antibodies, DEA 1.1 has the greatest stimulation potential. Thus most clinical reactions resulting from the
transfusion of incompatible cells occur when DEA 1.1 positive blood is given to a DEA 1.1 negative recipient.
Significant clinical reactions to DEA 1.2 may occur but are less severe than reactions to DEA 1.1. Dogs do not have iso-antibodies to incompatible blood groups and therefore the first incompatible transfusion is normally well tolerated.
Moreover, the development of antibodies due to sensitization as a result of transfusions with incompatible blood groups has to be evalua-ted in females of animals resulting from crossbreeding. Thus, puppies could develop isoerythrolysis and be susceptible to disease or even die because of haemolytic anaemia.
Blood typing is very important in veterinary practice in order to prevent the occurrence of serious pathologies due to the mixing of incompatible blood types in cats with A or B erythrocytes. Cats with B erythrocytes exhibit an immediate systemic anaphylactic reaction (hypotension, bradycardia, apnea, urination, defecation, vomiting, and severe neurological depression) and haemolytic signs (hemoglobinemia and hemoglobinuria) when transfused with Type A blood because of their natural high-titered anti-A antibody. Those cats with A erythrocytes and natural low-titered anti-B antibody will exhibit only a mild reaction when transfused with the B blood, but even this can make a difference in recovery rates in a medical situation since the transfused erythrocytes have a short life span. Neonatal isoerythrolysis can occur when there is blood group incompatibility between maternal and fetal blood.

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Published by: Dragos Cobzariu on Apr 19, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/18/2012

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