Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Buy Now $11.99
Standard view
Book view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword or section
Like this
49Activity
×
×
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query

Table Of Contents

P. 1
Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil

Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil

Ratings:

3.58

(456)
|Views: 2,081|Likes:
Soon after the fall of the Taliban, in 2001, Deborah Rodriguez went to Afghanistan as part of a group offering humanitarian aid to this war-torn nation. Surrounded by men and women whose skills–as doctors, nurses, and therapists–seemed eminently more practical than her own, Rodriguez, a hairdresser and mother of two from Michigan, despaired of being of any real use. Yet she soon found she had a gift for befriending Afghans, and once her profession became known she was eagerly sought out by Westerners desperate for a good haircut and by Afghan women, who have a long and proud tradition of running their own beauty salons. Thus an idea was born. With the help of corporate and international sponsors, the Kabul Beauty School welcomed its first class in 2003. Well meaning but sometimes brazen, Rodriguez stumbled through language barriers, overstepped cultural customs, and constantly juggled the challenges of a postwar nation even as she learned how to empower her students to become their families’ breadwinners by learning the fundamentals of coloring techniques, haircutting, and makeup.Yet within the small haven of the beauty school, the line between teacher and student quickly blurred as these vibrant women shared with Rodriguez their stories and their hearts: the newlywed who faked her virginity on her wedding night, the twelve-year-old bride sold into marriage to pay her family’s debts, the Taliban member’s wife who pursued her training despite her husband’s constant beatings. Through these and other stories, Rodriguez found the strength to leave her own unhealthy marriage and allow herself to love again, Afghan style.With warmth and humor, Rodriguez details the lushness of a seemingly desolate region and reveals the magnificence behind the burqa. Kabul Beauty School is a remarkable tale of an extraordinary community of women who come together and learn the arts of perms, friendship, and freedom.From the Hardcover edition.
Soon after the fall of the Taliban, in 2001, Deborah Rodriguez went to Afghanistan as part of a group offering humanitarian aid to this war-torn nation. Surrounded by men and women whose skills–as doctors, nurses, and therapists–seemed eminently more practical than her own, Rodriguez, a hairdresser and mother of two from Michigan, despaired of being of any real use. Yet she soon found she had a gift for befriending Afghans, and once her profession became known she was eagerly sought out by Westerners desperate for a good haircut and by Afghan women, who have a long and proud tradition of running their own beauty salons. Thus an idea was born. With the help of corporate and international sponsors, the Kabul Beauty School welcomed its first class in 2003. Well meaning but sometimes brazen, Rodriguez stumbled through language barriers, overstepped cultural customs, and constantly juggled the challenges of a postwar nation even as she learned how to empower her students to become their families’ breadwinners by learning the fundamentals of coloring techniques, haircutting, and makeup.Yet within the small haven of the beauty school, the line between teacher and student quickly blurred as these vibrant women shared with Rodriguez their stories and their hearts: the newlywed who faked her virginity on her wedding night, the twelve-year-old bride sold into marriage to pay her family’s debts, the Taliban member’s wife who pursued her training despite her husband’s constant beatings. Through these and other stories, Rodriguez found the strength to leave her own unhealthy marriage and allow herself to love again, Afghan style.With warmth and humor, Rodriguez details the lushness of a seemingly desolate region and reveals the magnificence behind the burqa. Kabul Beauty School is a remarkable tale of an extraordinary community of women who come together and learn the arts of perms, friendship, and freedom.From the Hardcover edition.

More info:

Publish date: Apr 10, 2007
Added to Scribd: Apr 24, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781588366078
List Price: $11.99 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Buy the full version from:AmazonBarnes & Noble
See More
See less

04/12/2014

396

9781588366078

$11.99

USD

Activity (49)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
anbarrineau reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I really enjoyed the memoir/ historical way this book read. I found it to be enlightening to the plight of women in Afghanistan, as well as other areas of the middle east. It was also interesting to learn about the cultural definitions of beauty and how they vary from one culture to another
kcoleman428 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This is a great story. It points out the differences in culture and custom as Debbie trys to teach the Afgan women about hair and make-up! fun to read.
petra5xs reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This is the third book I've read in three days and all three were on different views of humanity and improving lives and none were even slightly alike but all were 5-star books. Proper review coming up... sometime.
blhooley reviewed this
Elizabeth Cady Stanton once said, "until women give up respectability, they will never seize their freedom." Rodriguez takes this advice to heart and pursues her goals like a kamikaze with a curling iron.Kabul Beauty School by Deborah Rodriguez (Random House 2007) is an account of an American hairdresser who goes to Afghanistan after 9/11 with a relief organization, expecting to rough it and provide minor medical assistance and cleanup. Instead, her skills as a hairdresser are enthusiastically welcomed in the ex-patriot community. During her brief sojourn she decides to come back and open a beauty salon but ends up joining an already existing effort to start a beauty school in Kabul. She wants to improve the lives of Afghan women by giving them the skills and tools to start small businesses that will allow them some financial independence and freedom. It's an admirable goal that has major obstacles.But from the opening pages, we realize this is not the usual humanitarian tale. No, it's a wild tale told by a wild woman. I'm convinced Rodriguez must have been a thrill seeker hyped for excitement in any form. Debbie marries a non-English speaking Afghan man less than a month after she has met him and hides it from her family back in Michigan. Her new husband-- she just got rid of an abusive one back in Michigan -- already has another wife in Saudi Arabia who he continues to visit. She agrees to let her teenage son offer to marry a teenage Afghan girl to get her out of the clutches of a lecherous old man. She has business dealings with a Taliban drug-dealer. She gets her Afghan husband to regularly threaten to kill various people who are behaving badly. She helps a young Afghan woman fake her virginity during her consummation ceremony. She accosts her extremely dangerous neighbors with an assault rifle while in a nightgown, at their front door, not hers. Everyday is a roller coaster with new dangers and drama. I asked myself is Rodriguez brave or simply crazy?And this tell-all tale isn't told with any literary flare. There are sudden jumps in time and place that are confusing. Characters are not well developed. Important pieces of information are left unexplained. The memoir isn't resolved well. Yet, it is thoroughly engrossing. You just want to know what is going to happen and how it will all bring about the positive changes that Rodrigues, the Afghan women, and you the reader all desperately want. The strength of the memoir is that it gives a view into the intimate lives of everyday Afghan women, most of them treated like slaves either for sex or for physical labor. And despite crazy Debbie's Rambo style, I am inspired by her gutsy willingness to use seemingly small gifts to try to make big changes.
carolian35 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Much better written than her novel. Some interesting information about Afghanistan women, Afghanistan social customs, effects of war and so on.
abbylibrarian_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
When hairdresser and salon owner Debbie Rodriguez decides to volunteer helping women in Afghanistan, she had no idea what she was getting into. Even though the Taliban is no longer in control, its restrictive culture lives on and as Debbie invites women into her school, she starts to learn their stories. Beaten by husbands, sold by their families to the highest bidder, held captive in abusive marriages for fear of losing their beloved children, groped in public markets with no real hope that the police will care, the women of Kabul find refuge in the beauty salon. There, they can take off their veils and start learning a trade that will bring in money for themselves and for their families. I really enjoyed listening to Debbie's story, expertly narrated by audiobook pro Bernadette Dunne. Debbie's a down-to-earth, no-nonsense lady who doesn't seem to be afraid of anything. She's also determined to improve the lives of the women in Afghanistan. This is a great read for women's history month or any time.
eileenwysiwyg reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I have mixed feelings about this book. It was very readable and on the surface, I think what Rodriguez wanted to do for women in Afghanistan is commendable, BUT...she went at it like a typical American. As a nation, we are so brainwashed about our own greatness, that we are inevitably cultural bulls in every foreign China shop we enter. The book is an easy read - fairly well written and engaging. However, I kept finding myself cringing each time Rodriguez seemed to take a risk that was just a risk for risk's sake. She presents her marriage into the culture somewhat cavalierly, and so much of what she does seems impulsive. I was touched by the stories of the women - I don't think anyone can read of how they live and not want to just swoop in and rescue them and show them how life could be - but then - it would have to remove them from their home culture. I just don't know...it seems like the more "help" the Western world provides these women, the less they may actually be "helped" because the changes are too much, too fast. The human rights violations enrage me - but I can see how the whole enterprise is one of extreme frustration.
heatherreader reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Interesting look at Afghan women, but the author makes some odd choices and isn't always a sympathetic character.
boabflower_1 reviewed this
Rated 2/5
I wasn't overly impressed by this book. The repetitive nature of the anecdotes got very boring, very quickly, after the first few stories I got it - Afghan men/husbands/brothers/fathers/ (insert other male family members) beat their women. So cut those passages out and you are left with an interesting memoir/ travel piece. The insights into everyday life were interesting but there was so much else the author could have put in the story. Sarah Turnbull’s Almost French, covered the living in a foreign country story so much better.
kylljoi reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I often find myself unable to share books about non-profit work, mainly because they can be dry and my friends or family members don't have much interest. However this book was easy to share based on the premise alone. It is well written, with an appropriate amount of emotion. Considering Ms. Rodriguez's background it would have been easy for her to write an overly self-involved book but her focus is on her students, as well as the in-and-out of managing a non-profit. The book is currently making it's rounds in my social circle.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
P. 1
Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil