Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The War on Terror: One Year On

The War on Terror: One Year On

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,243|Likes:
One year ago, Osama bin Laden was killed in a daring nighttime raid by Navy SEALs on his compound in a small military garrison town in Pakistan. Since then, how has the war on terror changed? Should we be looking at it more critically than we are? In this essay collection, we examine the war on terror from several angles not often found in the popular discourse.
One year ago, Osama bin Laden was killed in a daring nighttime raid by Navy SEALs on his compound in a small military garrison town in Pakistan. Since then, how has the war on terror changed? Should we be looking at it more critically than we are? In this essay collection, we examine the war on terror from several angles not often found in the popular discourse.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: The American Security Project on Apr 25, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/25/2013

pdf

text

original

 
    E
    s    s    a    y
    C
    o    l    l    E    C
    t    i    o    n
www.AmericanSecurityProject.org1100 New York Avenue, NW Suite 710W Washington, DC
“Te War on error”One Year On
Edited by Joshua Foust 
 April 30, 2012
 A collection o essays marking one year since the death o Osama bin Laden
 
2
 AMERICAN SECURITY PROJECT
Introduction
O
ne year ago, Osama bin Laden was killed in a daring nighttime raid by Navy SEALs on his compoundin a small military garrison town in Pakistan. Since then, how has the war on terror changed? Should we be looking at it more critically than we are?In this essay collection, we examine the war on terror rom several angles not oten ound in the populardiscourse.Bernard Finel wonders i we know how well we’re doing. Measuring our progress in the global struggle againstIslamist terrorism is not simple. Government ocials now openly say the war is over
[1]
,
 
even while Islamistviolence is at historically high levels. Matthew Wallin explains how terrorist groups have revolutionized publicmessaging, as well as how the U.S. has struggled to keep pace with them. Carolyn Deady tries to see i  American public opinion has arrived at a common belie or how the war is going (it hasnt). August Cole examines a topic ew ever discuss in any detail – the incredible growth o the counterterrorismindustry. Private companies have been enlisted in the ght against terrorism, with little oversight and enormousbudgets on hand. It’s not an easy phenomenon to understand, coming at the same time as shrinking deensebudgets and a shit rom large wars to smaller conicts.erri Lodge and Bryan Gold note that the agging progress on global nuclear security issues mean the threat o loose nukes or nuclear material is as rightening as it ever has been. Randy Law looks at the history o how theU.S. responds to terrorism, and its inability to learn rom its own mistakes. Te result, he argues, is a constant war, where we must constantly relearn the same lessons.I have my own contribution as well, where I ask what kind o apparatus we’re building to combat terrorismin our borders. Tere are a growing number o trials that boil down to convicting people o thought crimes,o merely supporting terrorism rather than actively engaging in it. What does that mean or us as a country? And nally, John Adams mentions one topic so outside the box that its almost never mentioned: negotiating. America does not negotiate with terrorists, or so we say. But, Adams argues, maybe we should – especially i it would help us diminish the problem.Te war on terrorism, or whatever it’s being called this week, is not going away (no matter what the Obamaadministration might say). It’s vital we ask not just questions, but critical questions about it. o do any less would be to accept the continuing, unproductive wars we’ve seen the last decade. We can, and should, be able to do better.
 Joshua Foust, editor
[1] http://decoded.nationaljournal.com/2012/04/can-obama-saely-embrace-islam.php
 
3
Contents
Bernard Finel:Measuring Success in CounterterrorismMatthew Wallin:Te Voice of errorismCarolyn Deady:Osama bin Laden and the Fight for PublicOpinion August Cole:Te Explosive Growth of theCounterterrorism Industrial Complex erri Lodge & Bryan Gold:Te World is Coming Around to NuclearSecurity Randy Law: Americas Deadly Amnesia  Joshua Foust:Tought Crimes and error rials John Adams:How to Negotiate with erroristsStephen A. Cheney:Closing Remarks

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->