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TT 4.26.12

TT 4.26.12

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05/03/2012

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The student voice of Louisiana Tech University
TalkTech
 April 26, 2012 www.thetechtalk.org 
T
he
Volume 86Number 21
PRSRT STDNON-PROFITORGANIZATIONUS POSTAGE
PAID
RUSTON, LAPERMIT NO 104RETURNSERVICEREQUESTED
GREEK WEEK
See what all happened and get the recap of the week.
Learn about Tech’s karate team’s winning streak at nationals
PAGE
5
Is the new movie as funny as the old series?
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7
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9
HANNAH SCHILLING
Staff Reporter
Only 7 percent o the studentody participated in SGA elec-tions April 18 and 19.During these elections, theenhancement ee, renewing the$20 ee and adding on a new$30 ee to ull-time students’tuition, passed with 83 percentapproval.James King, vice president o student aairs, said the amounto voters that participated is anormal number.“We historically have seen10-12 percent even in the mosthotly contested races,” he said.“Students need to be involved ingovernance.”Taylor Michiels, a reshmanaccounting major, said he thinksmore advertising would havehelped.“I understand the candidateswere unopposed,” Michiels said,“but a couple o yers here andthere wouldn’t hurt.”All candidates were unop-posed, and have been elected.Scott Hunter, a sophomorearchitecture major, said he no-ticed this as he clicked on theubbles beside the candidates’names on election day.“There weren’t many optionsto vote or,” Hunter said. “Youcould vote, or you couldn’t.”Some students are not sohappy about the ee and votedagainst it in the election.“I didn’t vote or it becauseo things like the 3OH!3 andRed Jumpsuit Apparatus con-cert,” Hunter said. “I’m notsure how money is transerredaround, but the concert cost$80,000, and only about 1,200people went. They lost so muchmoney.”Kayla Johnson, a junior ki-nesiology major, said she ques-tions how money is transerredas well.“I eel like they are always up-ping tuition,” she said. “So whydo they need more money?”Even though she had somequestions, Johnson still votedor the ee.“Expanding parking spaceor parking is needed, and im-provement on acilities is need-ed,” she said.Michiels voted against theee because the projects listeddidn’t aect him.“The new eatures would benice,” Michiels said, “but I didn’teel like they would aect meas much as I would like sinceI don’t do intramurals or haveparking issues.”According to King, the frstproject the ee will tackle is thedemolition o Neilson Hall andCaruthers Hall, then new park-ing acilities will begin this sum-mer along with sidewalks andmore lights down Tech Driveand Alabama.Some o the improvementswill be seen fnished as early asFall Quarter.“I eel like I am aware o what’s going on around cam-pus,” Johnson said, “and I needto know what’s being brought tothe table and how the campuswill change.”
Email comments to hms017@latech.edu.
MEAGAN LEE
Staff Reporter
Prominent leaders in Rustongathered at time date place todiscuss Tech’s uture with thegrowing City o Ruston.“The Future o Ruston: TheProgress and Development inRuston and How it Will Impactthe University” was hosted bythe Tech University Senate.Featured speakers o the o-rum were Tech President DanReneau, Ruston Mayor DanHollingsworth, and Ruston-Lin-coln Chamber o CommerceChairman Ryan Kilpatrick.Many topics were coveredin the two-hour orum includingpopulation trends, communitydemographics, accountabil-ity issues, new education man-dates, and how the communityis preparing or the uture.Tech University Senate Pres-ident David Szymanski said,however, that although all o these topics were discussed, itwas decided that the frst orumshould address the uture o theCity o Ruston and its relation-ship with Tech.Both Reneau and MayorHollingsworth gave due creditto each other, mentioning howimportant the university andthe city’s alliance is. Each groupis crucial to the other.Focus was put on Tech’s business incubators at TechPointe, perhaps one o the brightest spots or the uture o the city and the university.“These are the uture o  business or Ruston,” Kilpatricksaid. “Since they are partneredthrough Tech, both the univer-sity and city will beneft rom asuccessul operation.”He went on to explain thatRuston will not only receivesales tax and other beneftsrom the success o these busi-nesses, but it will also start togrow because more businessesmean more jobs and more peo-ple.“The education levels pro-vided by the school district andthe two universities in the par-ish provide great learning op-portunities,” Bell said.Love said the upgrades inthe city will only continue tomake things better.The orum was ollowed bya question and answer sessionwhere aculty and sta couldvoice their questions and con-cerns to the city and universityleaders as well as an inormalreception.“The university senatethought this would be a greatopportunity to take a proactiveapproach to help current andpotential aculty and sta learnmore about the City o Ruston,its plans or uture developmentand its school system,” Syz-manski explained.The uture o Ruston seemsto be looking up or both thecity and the university. Brightthings lie ahead.This can assuredly be seento come rom the teamwork o a community which is dedicat-ed to wanting the best.
Email comments to mdl024@latech.edu.
AUSTIN VINING
Staff Reporter
Twenty teams o fve to seven players gathered April 21 toparticipate in the second annual Swamp Ball hosted by GreekAcademy, a branch o the Interraternity CouncilChristian Scott, a sophomore biology major, said SwampBall is a mud volleyball tournament hosted by Greek Academyto raise money or dierent causes.Med-Camps o Louisiana was chosen to be the recipiento the money raised this year, he said, which was more than$1,200. Med-Camps is a summer camp that ocuses on cater-ing to the needs o children with disabilities.Scott said he was pleased that the group was able to raiseso much money or Med-Camps. “Some people don’t have thesame opportunities as others, and being able to contribute tohelping them out is great,” he said.The frst Swamp Ball was held April 15, 2011, and was at alocation o campus. Greek Academy was very excited to beable to have the event on campus this year, Scott said.“We paved the way or uture years and ound what worksand doesn’t work, so I know it will only get better,” he said.Greek Academy is a program designed to create uture lead-ers within the raternity system, Scott said.“I joined to help better mysel and get new ideas to bring back to my raternity,” he said. “It’s given me experience asa leader, time management skills and a greater sense o what being a leader is.Christopher E. Rayner, a senior human resources and politi-cal science major, is the one who initially had the idea o GreekAcademy.“Mr. (Ron) Cathy, director o career services and Counsel-ing Services, and I began to cultivate the program in summer2009,” he said, “The frst program started all 2009.”The purpose o Greek Academy is to develop the charactero young Greek men, Rayner said. He started the program be-cause he said he elt there was a lack o leadership and unityamong young raternity men, he said.“The guys did an exceptional job,” Rayner said. “I believethe cause chosen was very admirable on the academy’s behal.”He said the number o members have grown due to theSwamp Ball project. Everything they learned during GreekAcademy was projected in all aspects o the event, Rayner said.Jayde Hughes, a junior speech pathology major, said a ellowOrientation Student Leader and past Greek Academy member,Nick Rangel, suggested they get a team together.
Photo by Shradha Sharma
At IFC’s second annual Swamp Ball tournament April 21, Union Board played against Landon’s Arms at the lower intramural feld.
Second Swamp Ball successful
StudentvotersapproveSGA fee
Ruston’sleadersdiscussfuture
>
see
SWAMP
page 3
REBECCA ALVAREZ
Staff Reporter
Many people would agree thatopening a door with ull hands isdifcult, but to do the same roma wheelchair or with crutches, thetask would seem nearly impos-sible.Some buildings on campushave powered doors to give eas-ier access to those with disabili-ties, but there are a ew buildingsthat are still missing the silvertrigger button by the door. TheBarnes and Noble Bookstore isone building that does not havepower doors.“Handicap doors are not re-quired to be power doors,” SamWallace, director o acility andsupport services, said. “They areonly required to be accessible topeople with disabilities.”Wallace works with architectswho design buildings and reno-vations to ensure each project isin compliance with governmentlaws and codes.The building is leased toBarnes and Noble by Tech andhas its own standards or howthe store should be designed, butWallace oversees that the designsadhere to codes and laws. Hesaid the entrance meets state frecodes and the mandates o theAmericans with Disabilities Act, but it is hard to disabled or handi-capped students.Sophomore kinesiology major,Lauren Arica recalled strugglingwith the bookstore doors whenshe was using crutches during allquarter.“It was completely inacces-sible,” she said. “I couldn’t do itmysel.”Arica was using crutches a-ter having knee surgery and said besides having her hands ull, theweight o the door did not al-
Photo by Sumeet Shrestha
The doors at the bookstore have not been converted topower doors and this has posed as a problem or manydisabled and handicapped students.
Bookstore entrancepresents problems
>
see
BOOKS
page 8
 
THREE STOOGES
 
2
The Tech Talk
April 26, 2012
Sigma Kappa hostsannual Kickin’ Grass
Sigma Kappa will host its an-nual Kickin’ Grass to Cure Al-zheimer’s Kickball tournamentat 10 a.m. May 5 at the Rus-ton High School Girl’s SotballFields.There must be 10 playerson a team. The cost is $12 perperson and a commemorativeT-shirt will be included. Teamsign-up sheets are due Mondayto any member o Sigma Kappa.Pike Productions will be pro-viding music. There will be jam-alaya dishes on sale or $3.For more inormation con-tact Jordan Toeper, vice presi-dent o philanthropic services,at 337-853-6288 or jet032@lat-ech.edu.
BFA presents seniorphotography exhibit
The 2012 BFA PhotographyExposition Reception will beheld at 5 p.m. Friday at the En-terprise Center.The exhibition, which will beopen rom April 27 until May16, will eature the work o 11senior photography majors. Thetheme or the exhibition is Fic-tional Truths. Fictional Truthsaddresses important issues likeaging, aith and amily.For more inormation on thereception or exhibition contactDorene Kordal at dorene@lat-ech.edu or (318) 257-3890.
IS to host 13thannual India Night
The Association o IndianStudents will host its 13th annu-al India Night at 6 p.m. May 5 inthe Student Center, Main Floor.The event will eature a va-riety o Indian cultural showsand authentic oods. Admissionis $12 or students and $15 orthe public.Tickets can be purchased atthe International Student Oce,located in Tolliver Hall, Room229. Seating is limited. Reserv-ing tickets in advance is recom-mended.For more inormation con-tact Purnima Kharidehal, gener-al secretary o AIS at 617-416-3033 or ais@latech.edu.
Typing for ten backat Tech’s campus
Typing or Ten is back andtime is money.Faculty, sta and studentswho participate will earn $10cash up to two times. Tech IDis required.The Center or Secure Cy-erspace invites you to come byany weekday until May 8 rom 9a.m. to 5 p.m. either in the Stu-dent Center or Tolliver Hall.Contact Rachel Parks withquestions or comments at 318-257-3475 or rparks@latech.edu
Gun and knife showopens Saturday
The Ruston Civic Center willhost the event on Saturday rom9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundayrom 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.More than 120 tables haveeen sold to vendors rom atleast our dierent states. Therewill be a wide variety o guns,ammunition, knives, coins, ar-chery items and security sys-tems available at the Gun andKnie show.Those who attend will beable to buy, trade, or sell itemsat the show. Admission is $7 perperson. The Civic Center is lo-cated at 401 N. Trenton St.For more inormation callthe Ruston-Lincoln Chamber o Commerce at 318-255-2031.
4th Annual SOCA 5Ko be held in Ruston
Tech’s School o Architec-ture is hosting its 4th annual5K at 11 a.m. Saturday at MaysChapel Church, 501 W. LineAve.The race is being held to im-prove the impoverished neigh-orhood o South o CaliorniaAvenue (SOCA).Ater the race ends a blockparty will be held at DuncanPark, 1311 Arlington Street.Race day registration be-gins at 8:30 a.m. and only thosewishing to run or walk the racemay participate.For more inormation con-tact Kevin Singh, CommunityDesign Activism Center em-ployee, at 318-257-5267 orsingh@latech.edu.
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GRACE MOORE
Staff Reporter
Dawgs 4 Dogs was hosted byTech students Wednesday wheretheir canine riends wore neck bandanas that read, Adopt meand I will love you orever.”The Applied OrganizationalCommunication class required itsve students to choose a singletopic, increase understanding orthat issue and make a measurableimpact.“Our goals are to raise aware-ness or spaying and neuteringcats and dogs, and the adoptiono them,” said Bryan Babcock,a senior speech communicationmajor. “Along with these eorts,we hope to establish a dog parkin Ruston.”In preparation or this event,the class contacted several busi-nesses or donations.Ruston’s 4 PAWS organizationoered seven dogs or adoptionor oster care, as well as studentcoupons or discounted spayingand neutering.Greco Pet Supplies o BatonRouge and the Houston Hu-mane Society donated dog ood,dog treats and toys to ll “doggy bags” or each new owner to getthem started. In addition, theRuston Sonic Drive-In restaurantdonated hot dogs or the event’sattendees.Babcock said the class alsomet with Ruston Mayor Dan Hol-lingsworth and Wes Barton, thedirector o Parks and Recreationin Ruston, to move closer towardits goal o implementing a publicdog park. There was a petition atthe event students could sign tosupport the cause.Ashley Birch, a senior speechcommunication major, is o theve in charge o the event.“We are just trying to make thecity aware that this is a problem,and it needs to be addressed,”she said.The class chose approximate-ly ve potential locations or thepark. Its initial idea was Cook-town Park, Babcock said, but theclass is still exploring each optionthoroughly.“We are in the process rightnow o writing a proposal to getthe park established or get it inmotion,” he said. “The Rustoncommunity doesn’t really showawareness or animals in ourarea.”Though the students primar-ily work as a group, Birch saideach student was responsible orcontacting certain organizationsto make this event possible andprogress urther in establishing apark.David Miller, a senior mechan-ical engineering major, said hethinks the City o Ruston is lack-ing in several areas, moreover orpet owners, which is reason to build a dog park.“I think it doesn’t really eelwelcoming or dog walkers,” hesaid.Beyond the prospective dogpark, Birch said the key issueremains the lack o spayed andneutered cats and dogs aroundTech’s campus and in Ruston.“Obviously the cat popula-tion at Tech is very large, so weencourage o-campus studentsto take in the animals on campusto give them shots and a goodhome,” Babcock said.The local agency, 4 PAWS,is a non-prot organization thataims to limit the number o stray and mistreated dogs in theLincoln Parish area, by rescuingand adopting them out to betterhomes.Ruth Logan, a 4 PAWS boardmember and volunteer, said shehas eight oster dogs and has been ostering dogs or approxi-mately our years.She said too oten animals areabused, neglected and thrownaway.“The most important thingis or people to be aware o theproblem,” she said.Without organizations like 4PAWS, several dogs would beeuthanized each year to controlthe growing population o strays,Birch said.“I think pet owners need tounderstand the responsibilitieso taking in an animal,” she said.And i everything ully aligns, youshould adopt or oster animals.”
Email comments to gmm008@latech.edu.
AUSTIN VINING
Staff Reporter
Ater Union Board’s springconcert, “Don’t Trust Me”resonated in many students’minds as more than just thetitle o the second single re-leased by headlining band,3OH!3.Union Board budgeted$80,000 or its annual springconcert, which eatured bands Shayli, Red JumpsuitApparatus and 3OH!3. UnionBoard President Je Bou-dreaux estimated less than7 percent o Tech’s student body was in attendance.Jason Greer, a College o Business senator in the Stu-dent Government Associa-tion, said he is amiliar withcontrolling student-allocatedunds because SGA andUnion Board use similar strat-egies.“Every time we have a billthat comes to vote, we haveto step back and attempt to justiy i we can spend thestudents’ money fat out,” hesaid. “We have to decide i enough o the student bodywill benet per dollar spent.”An event such as thespring concert has the poten-tial to attract a much largerpercentage o students, Greersaid.Greer said with an evento this stature, he does notquite understand where eachportion o the budget went.“I don’t believe UnionBoard can rationalize thelarge amount they spent ontheir biggest event, springconcert, in terms o atten-dance,” Greer said.Bryan Babcock, a seniorspeech major, said he wouldlike to see Union Board putorth more eort to nd outwhat students want and whatis going to benet them.“It’s a student-driven or-ganization, and they’re hereto make decisions or the stu-dents,” he said.Union Board does whatthey want as an organizationand not necessarily what thestudents want, Babcock said.“I would like to see UnionBoard venture out rom thatand do a poll or maybe asurvey to get what studentswould actually want to see,”he said.Je Boudreaux, presidento Union Board, said UnionBoard’s unding comes solelyrom a student assessmentee, which charges ull-timeundergraduate students $10per quarter. Other studentsare charged an amount basedon the number o hours theytake.Boudreaux said approxi-mately 1,200 people attendedthe concert with roughly two-thirds being Tech students.Compared to other univer-sities like Louisiana State Uni-versity and the University o Louisiana at Monroe, UnionBoard’s budget is very lim-ited, he said.“Ater speaking with thepresident o ULM’s CAB(Campus Activities Board),their organization has a bud-get o $400,000 each year,”Boudreaux said. “One canonly imagine the budget o LSU’s related organization.”Union Board is aced withthe dicult task o provid-ing entertainment to a verydiverse student body, he said.“The quality and diversityo the programming that wesponsored this year has beencollectively the best com-pared to that o recent years,”Boudreaux said.In this manner, UnionBoard aims to appeal to thelargest variety o studentspossible, he said.“Our history o sponsor-ing diverse entertainmentthroughout the year in ad-dition to the all and springconcerts creates an overallwell-balanced collection o programming,” Boudreauxsaid.As a result, he said, UnionBoard cycles through multiplegenres in order to cater to theinterests o most students.“It is impossible,” Bou-dreaux said, “to please everystudent with one concert.”
Email comments to acv001@latech.edu.
Union Board Spring budget examined
Dawgs 4 Dogsdebuts at Tech
 
Photos by Jessica Van Alstyne
Above: Puppies at Dawgs 4 Dogs were dressed to impress the students.Below: Students were more than happy to pet puppies in between classes. The Dawgs for Dogspet adoption opportunity was held Wednesday in the Quad.
 
April 26, 2012
The Tech Talk
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KALEB CAUSEY
Staff Reporter
Klingons, cheering compe-titions, and Nirvana were notaround in William Shakespeare’stime, but that’s what someonewould have seen i they were atthe Shakespeare Birthday Festi-val held on Tuesday.Sigma Tau Delta, an Englishhonor society, has put this eventon or the past six years in theShakespeare Garden in the cen-ter o George T. Madison Hall.The theme or the sixth an-nual event was Shakespearit andeatured ourteen perormances y various students and acultymembers. Missy Wallace, a sec-ond year English graduate stu-dent, said Shakespearit was anexpression o dierent spiritsound in Shakespeare’s writings.“The ghosts that appear inhis plays, enthusiasm or the bard and his work, and the al-coholic beverages are appropri-ate aspects when consideringShakespearit,” Wallace said.The estival eatured eventsinvolving renaissance music, arewriting o a popular Nirvanasong to involve Shakespearit,puppeteers and presentationsrelating Shakespeare’s writings.Dorothy Robbins, aculty ad-visor to Sigma Tau Delta, saidthe estival never has a dull mo-ment by having students andaculty members read Shake-speare’s sonnet sequence in the breaks between perormances.“We welcome audiencemembers to partake in thesonnet reading,” Robbins said.“There are times when we have200 people crunched into thegarden and other times wherewe only have a dozen.”She also said that no mat-ter how big or small the crowd,people enjoy the opportunity toparticipate in the estival.Matt Rich, vice-president o Sigma Tau Delta, said that his a-vorite part is the sonnet reading.“I enjoy listening to peopleread the sonnets, as well asreading them mysel,” Rich said.“It’s a way or academics to bemore accessible and it’s a moreconversational way o learningwithout lectures or a notebook.”Wallace said that her avoritepart was the aculty presenta-tions rom English proessors.“The music and sword ght-ing are crowd pleasers,” Wallacesaid. “However, I love hearingthe English proessors talk aboutaspects o Shakespeare I neverconsidered.”Kenneth Robbins, director o the school o perorming arts,was one o the speakers in Tues-day’s estival and gave a lecturetitled “Zombies & Other DeadThings”.“It was a un piece to work onand was most unusual,” K. Rob- bins said. “I had a lot o un andI hope the audience did too.”D. Robbins said the estivalwas started as a way to makeSigma Tau Delta more knownon campus.“We needed an identity oncampus,” D. Robbins said. “Sowe thought, what better waythan to honor an icon o Eng-lish.”Larkin Culpepper, a juniorspeech pathology major, saidher avorite event was the pup-pet show taken rom “A Mid-summer Night’s Dream”.All o the English proes-sors did a great job o engagingthe audience and keeping themlaughing,” Culpepper said.She also read one o Shake-speare’s sonnets during the es-tival.“Reading a sonnet gave memore o perspective o howShakespeare elt when he wroteand read his work,” Culpeppersaid.D. Robbins said that the eventcould relate to anyone whostopped by or a perormance orsonnet reading.“There really is somethingthat everyone can take awayrom the poems, music, andtalks,” D. Robbins said.
Email comments to ktc013@latech.edu.
CHAD MERRITT
Staff Reporter
Though they were taking onthe added adversary in a stom-ach bug, the Tech Debate Teamstill managed to do well in com-petition.The International PublicDebate Association’s NationalTournament was held at SamHouston State University April12-15.Tech competed against 71niversities rom across theUnited States and our oreigncountries’ teams.Dr. Web Drake, the IPDAGoverning Board Chair, said thistournament is the largest tour-nament o the year, and thatthis tournament was the largesttournament in its history.Trey Avant, a senior politi-cal science and sociology ma- jor, placed the highest amongTech’s debaters. Avant won theth top speaker in the nation orteam debate, and placed in thetop our in team debate.“Being that I started on thedebate team at the beginning o the year, now that I am one o the best debaters in the nationmeans a lot,” he said.A wide range o topics werediscussed at the tournamentthis year, ranging rom issueslike hydraulic racturing meth-ods and US/Syrian relations totopics like sports and why themovie “Bridesmaids” shouldhave won more Oscars.David Hyde, a senior bio-medical engineering major, saysthere is a topic or everyone.“Many people think it’s a bunch o tough topics, but re-ally, the topics are broad enoughor any interest,” Hyde said.Hyde, who placed top six-teen in the nation, said debatingthe topic o whether herbivoresor carnivores were right was hisavorite topic during the tourna-ment.“Yelling at someone because you think herbivores are betterthan carnivores is pretty awe-some,” Hyde said.Members o Tech’s debateteam ranked highly among oth-er schools, beating out schoolssuch as Tulane, Texas A&M andRice.Kristin Farquharson, a seniorpolitical science and sociologymajor, won ourth best speakerin the nation at the tournament.She said the progress she hasmade since she joined the de- bate team makes her proud.“It’s really cool to see that ina couple months Shane couldmake me the ourth best speak-er in the nation,” Farquharsonsaid.Shane Puckett, director o debate, said he is proud o how ar Tech’s debate team hascome.“The team has accomplishedso much in the past ew years,”Puckett said. “The resources o Tech’s students, rom their criti-cal thinking skills to their inter-personal skills, makes them verywell-rounded as competitors.”Although the debate season just ended with the nationaltournament, Tech’s debateteam is already beginning prep-arations or next season.The debate team is open toany student willing to partici-pate, regardless o past partici-pation, knowledge or skill.“I was pretty bad when Istarted debate at the beginningo the year,” Avant said. Andnow I’m the orth best in the na-tion, which is really cool.”
Email comments to cam059@latech.edu.
“I thought it would be a good wayto bond with everyone and plus itsounded un,” she said.Hughes said she had a great time, but she wanted to play more gamesater her team was eliminated romthe bracket. She also said she par-ticipated because it was or a goodcause.“I think it showed that no matterour dierences, we all care abouthelping others, and that’s all that trulymatters,” Hughes said.Lori McAee, a senior businessmanagement major, was part o thewinning team, “Sets on the beach.”She said she decided to participatein swamp ball because o her successwith the tournament last year.“It always eels great to win,”McAee said, “It eels even better towin Swamp Ball back to back.”It was a great cause and there wasa great turnout, she said. It was a re-ally good idea, and she was happyshe was able to help raise money orphilanthropy, she said.“I’m glad it was earlier this yearso we didn’t have to play in the dark,”McAee said, “It was windy and coldin the morning, but other than that weenjoyed it.”
Email comments to acv001@latech.edu.
Sigma Tau Delta presents sixth annual Shakespearit
Debate team picks up individual wins
“The resources o Tech’s students, romtheir critical thinkingskills to their inter-personal skills, makesthem very well-round-ed as competitors.”
Shane Puckett
professor of speech
GRACE MOORE
Staff Reporter
For a stutterer, speaking is like amuscle. I they fex that muscle andspeak more oten, their speech will bestrengthened.In late March, a graduate studentestablished a Tech chapter or the Na-tional Stuttering Association to unitethose aected on common ground.Adam Grzybowski, a speech pa-thology graduate student, said his ex-periences in another support groupor stutterers prompted him to open achapter at Tech.“As a stutterer, I have insight thatother stutterers may respond to a littleit more,” Grzybowski said. “I knowwhat it’s like to know what I want tosay and not being able to say it. It’s re-ally rustrating.”He said the NSA group meetingsare not a therapy session, but a com-ortable setting or stutterers to shareexperiences, explore coping strategiesand improve sel-esteem.“By coming to a group with like-minded people, some social pressureis taken o,” said Christy Madix, theaculty adviser or the NSA.She said stuttering is no morenique than someone wearing glassesor a hearing aid.More than 3 million Americansstutter, according to stutteringhelp.org, which means more than 3 millionindividuals struggle with several dailyactivities.“Stutterers struggle with things likepublic speaking, talking on the phoneand ordering ood,” Grzybowski said.“[Stutterers] also struggle meetingpeople o the opposite sex, which isintimidating enough even i you don’tstutter.”He said stutterers oten eel like aninvisible hand is grasping their esopha-gus.“A guy back in Ohio took like eightminutes to tell us his name,” he said.Bill Willoughby, associate dean o liberal arts, said he becomes rustratedwhen he has clear ideas ormulated inhis head, but when he speaks he can’tget the ideas in his head out o hismouth.“Sometimes I will get stuck duringa lecture, but students have told me,‘your stuttering helps us listen to you,’”Willoughby said. “It’s a broken pattern,and that pattern helps.”Unlike some, he said his stutter doesnot hold him back; it is not a disability.Madix said she hopes a communitysupport group at Tech will encourageindividuals with a disfuency, an um- brella term under which stuttering iscategorized, to abolish personal limita-tions stemmed rom ear.Stutters are extremely situational,Madix said. It can be caused in resulto a traumatic event, neurological cri-ses like a stroke and most commonlythrough genetic links.However, she said everyone is dis-fuent to a certain degree, but individu-als with a stuttering problem cope withit 365 days a year.Whether a stutterer has a mild,moderate or severe case, every dayis exhausting because o talking andthinking about speaking the entire day,Grzybowski said.“I have trouble with R’s, W’s andS’s,” he said, “and I avoid the wordlemon.”Ordering lemonade rom a restau-rant is such a standard action, he said, but it may take him several extra sec-onds to put his request into words.Willoughby said, in his lectures orwhen talking to a small group, his stut-ter is trivial, but when he is caught o-guard and asked to introduce himsel,he has diculties.“One time, I was at a conerenceintroducing mysel, and I could notget my name out,” he said. “The manlooked at me like I had a disease; it washorribly rustrating.Some loopholes do exist as a recessor stutterers. Oddly enough, there isno disfuency in singing, Madix said.Additionally, Grzybowski said hecan speak or hours on end with a or-eign accent without any stuttering.“Honestly, or a kid who stutters, you would think I wouldn’t talk somuch,” he said.Willoughby said he oten connectsa stutterer’s speech to someone speak-ing in English with an accent.Grzybowski said his central goal isto inspire at least one person to raisetheir hand in the classroom or ap-proach a stranger. He said, i that hap-pens, the group will be a success.“Fear should not outweigh a per-son’s decision to make their lie better,”Grzybowski said, “and this group it tohelp build condence, one word at atime.”The NSA Tech chapter will hold itsthird meeting May 3 in Robinson HallRoom 311.
Email comments to gmm008@latech.edu.
Photo by Shradha Sharma
Union Board plays Landon’s Arms on Tech’s lower intramural felds.
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