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DAILY 04.26.12

DAILY 04.26.12

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Published by coo9486
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published April 26, 2012.
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published April 26, 2012.

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FEATURES/3
FADI QURAN
From Stanford backto the West Bank
SPORTS/6
CALL ME MAYBE
Prospects await their NFL draft fates
Tomorrow 
Mostly Sunny 
6650
Today 
Mostly Sunny 
6247
By ALEXIS GARDUNO
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
Stanford’s Global Climate andEnergy Project (GCEP) has award-ed $8.4 million to seven Stanford re-search teams for developing high-efficiency energy technologies de-signed to reduce greenhouse gasemissions.“These awards support funda-mental research on a broad range of potentially game-changing energytechnologies,” said GCEP directorSally Benson, according to the Stan-ford News Service.The GCEP, an industry partner-ship supported by five firms ExxonMobil, GE, Schlumberger,Toyota and DuPont — and based atStanford, has in total supported 93research programs with $113 mil-lion in grants since the project’s2002 launch.The GCEP portfolio includes re-search grants in fields ranging fromphotovoltaic energy to carbon cap-ture.While GCEP’s grants are wellknown in the scientific community,they are only accessible for Stan-ford faculty. GCEP grants are ex-plicitly targeted at funding researchin its earliest stages, to counter the
Index 
Features/3 Opinions/4 Sports/6 Classifieds/7
Recycle Me
Stanford teams develop efficient energy tech to combat greenhouse gas emissions
 An Independent Publication
 www.stanforddaily.com
 The Stanford Daily T
THURSDAY Volume 241
 April 26, 2012Issue 47
SPEAKERS & EVENTS
Faculty panel talksopportunities,challenges of 2020
SPEAKERS & EVENTS
Warsh discussesDodd-Frank reform
By NATASHA WEASER
DESK EDITOR
“Some will say it’s a bad thing and others will say it’s agood thing but too few will say ‘Dodd-Frank risks the fol-lowing bad things, but there is an alternative,’” said KevinWarsh ’92, former member of the Federal Reserve Boardof Governors, Wednesday.Throughout his talk, Warsh emphasized what hedeemed the “three fundamental pillars” of the economy —regulators, market discipline and capital standards — andhow they should be applied to government legislation.Warsh, currently a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institu-tion and a lecturer at the Graduate School of Business(GSB), spoke to an audience of approximately 70 people atPaul Brest Hall Wednesday evening, in a talk titled “RealRegulatory Reform: A Practitioner’s Perspective.”The regulation in question, the Dodd-Frank Wall StreetReform and Consumer Protection Act, is a federal statutesigned into law by President Obama in July 2010 and in-tended to provide more extensive regulation of financialinstitutions following the recession in the late 2000s. TheDodd-Frank Act has come under extensive criticism for itscomplexity and, for some, excessive regulation.Although Warsh joked that his experience practicing
GCEP grants $8.4mfor green research
NEWS BRIEF
 Speaker encourages dialoguewithin Jewish community
UNIVERSITY
Senator scrutinizesclaims by JudicialAffairs co-chair
 Statements at meeting were misleading, created confusion among ASSU reps
By BRENDAN O’BYRNE
DEPUTY EDITOR
Michele Dauber, Stanford law professorand co-chair of the Judicial Affairs Committee,made misleading statements to an assembly of student representatives last Wednesday re-garding the new Alternative Review Process(ARP) for sexual assault cases on campus.ASSU Senator Ben Laufer ’12 said at the Sen-ate’s Tuesday meeting, at which Dauber wasnot present, that he felt she “misled to the pointwhere she even actually might have lied to us.”Laufer later apologized for saying Dauber mayhave lied.The misleading statement came whenDauber was discussing how sexual assaultcases handled by Judicial Affairs are civil cases,which she incorrectly said never require unan-imous agreement among jurors.“There is no such thing as a unanimous re-quirement in any civil case anywhere, ever,”Dauber told the assembly last week. “We justdon’t have unanimous requirements in civilcases.”According to a Department of Justice Sta-tistics Special Report on civil justice in statecourts from 2004, 27 states require unanimousconvictions in civil cases. Only 11 require athree-fourths majority and all others, exceptfor Montana, require a higher percentage of agreement (Montana only requires two-thirdsagreement).Dauber responded in an email to The Dailythat the 2004 report is accurate, but warned of intricacies in the legal process, as differentcourts have different rules across states. Nosuch nuance or qualification was included inher original statement at the meeting.In addition, Dauber said that by “we,” shewas referring to the State of California, whichshe felt was clear given Stanford’s location.Laufer, Senator Alon Elhanan ’14 and Stan-ford Daily Senate reporter Julia Enthoven ’15all stated that no such clarification was con-veyed during that part of the meeting. All threestated that they were under the impression
Website inefficiencies causebattery drainage
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
Research on the battery-crippling effect of free apps, watching video or playing games on asmartphone is well known and highly publicizedbut, according to researchers at Stanford andDeutsche Telekom, even browsing popular web-sites can cause rapid battery drainage.Researchers suggest that the inefficiency —caused by bloated and redundant code — canbe reduced by almost 30 percent without induc-ing a diminished user experience, and noted thatincreased website energy efficiency will becomeincreasingly important as smartphone usagecontinues to increase.Stanford computer scientist Narendran Thi-agarajan and her research team measured theenergy usage of an Android phone when down-loading and rendering 25 popular websites overa 3G connection. The team discovered that load-ing the mobile version of Wikipedia consumedover 1 percent of the phone’s battery, as did theApple homepage, which offers no mobile ver-sion for smartphone users.The team repeated the measurements withlocally saved versions of tested websites — re-moving the energy requirement posed by down-loading the page — and rewrote the websitecoding to reduce energy usage by nearly a third.
 — Marshall Watkins
By AARON SEKHRI
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
“Visions of Tomorrow” was the theme at Wednesdayevening’s Stanford 2020 Symposium, which includedseven 15-minute presentations by notable Stanford facul-ty on a host of subjects ranging from global democracy toa food revolution.The event, financially supported by the ASSU, theSpeaker’s Bureau and the Vice Provost for Undergradu-ate Education, and co-sponsored by 18 other campusgroups, united seven faculty members of diverse special-ties to discuss fundamental future trends and problemsgleaned from their own research, and the multidiscipli-nary approaches to their solutions.The event was kicked off by David Kennedy, professorof history, who spoke about the potential for a water short-age in the American West in the near future, which he at-tributed to climate change, land subsidence and a flawedplumbing infrastructure.“The tremendous success story that is the develop-ment of the American West was made possible by massiveirrigation,” Kennedy said.He warned that ongoing trends mean the future supplyof water for humans is far less certain than a generationago. Kennedy concluded by discussing the global scope of the problem and sharing his hope for the audience to worktoward a solution.Larry Diamond ’73 M.A. ’78 Ph.D. ’80, director of theCenter on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL), presented on the topic of a more demo-cratic world, and shared his optimism for this trend to be-come the norm.This hope was compounded by his observation that“there exist many now functioning democracies despiterelatively modest economic growth,” in contrast with theprevailing narrative that freedoms are closely connectedto economic performance.“You don’t have to be a part of the middle class,” he as-serted, “to believe in dignity, or in human rights.”The “clock is ticking for authoritarian regimes,” Dia-mond concluded, asserting that 2020 will be a much freerand more democratic time than today.Stan Christensen, a lecturer in civil and environmentalengineering and a partner at Arbor Advisors, proceededwith the topic of negotiations, their importance, theirunder-appreciation and common misconceptions on thesubject.
M.J MA/The Stanford Daily
Please see
2020
, page 5Please see
 ARP
, page 2
IAN GARCIA-DOTY/The Stanford Daily
Kevin Warsh, a former member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors and afellow at the Hoover Institution, discussed financial reform Wednesday evening.Warsh expressed concern that Dodd-Frank is inadequate in regulating finance.
Please see
GRANTS
, page 5
SPEAKERS & EVENTS
Ben-Amiadvocates two-state solution
By MARWA FARAG
MANAGING EDITOR
Jeremy Ben-Ami, founder andpresident of advocacy group JStreet, advocated for a two-statesolution to the Israeli-Palestinianconflict and open discussion on Is-rael within the American Jewishcommunity in a talk Wednesday atthe Black Community ServicesCenter.Ben-Ami discussed three areasof challenge facing Americans onsubjects related to Israel — the fu-ture of the Israeli state, Israel inU.S. politics and how the Ameri-can Jewish community can holdconversation on both subjects. Hecriticized Israel’s current path as“simply not sustainable.”“I start by acknowledging allthat Israel has accomplished, butwe have to be honest and ac-knowledge all of the challengesand the threats,” Ben-Ami said.He went on to detail the exter-nal and internal threats facing Is-rael, including “a terrible neigh-borhood” and the “extremefringes of Israeli society.These challenges, Ben-Amiposited, complicate the questionof supporting Israel today.“Back when I was growing upin the ’60s and ’70s, supporting Is-rael was a really straightforwardproposition: You simply stood
Please see
 WARSH
, page 5Please see
BEN-AMI
, page 2
 
2
N
Thursday, April 26, 2012
 The Stanford Daily
with Israel,” he said. “Israel wasDavid, a small country, facingdown Goliath . . . Today the storyis far less simple.”“The question of what it meansto be pro-Israel is far more com-plex and the heart of the challengetoday is the need to find a resolu-tion to the longstanding conflictwith the Palestinian people,” headded.Being pro-Israel today, as Ben-Ami argued and J Street advo-cates, means embracing a two-state solution to the Israel-Pales-tinian conflict, whereby a territo-rial compromise is the “only waythat Israel can remain both a truedemocracy and retain its Jewishcharacter.”“For those who care deeplyabout the future and security of anational homeland for the Jewishpeople in the land of Israel . . . theissue of a Palestinian state and theestablishment of an accepted bor-der between Israel and that stateis an existential necessity,” Ben-Ami said.While acknowledging that Is-rael’s own citizens are ultimatelyresponsible to make the choice tochange the country’s course, he as-signed a role to American Jews, aswell.“We [friends of Israel] have tohelp our cousins in Israel to recog-nize the need to change course be-fore it’s too late,” Ben-Ami said.Moving to the subject of Israelwithin American politics, Ben-Ami held that the United Statesmust act as mediator between Is-rael and the Palestinians, compar-ing the relationship between thelatter two parties to a “bad mar-riage” and arguing against directnegotiations.“This conflict is like a bad mar-riage, in which a couple needs a di-vorce and they need to come toterms on how to separate,” hesaid. “In my experience, you don’tlock an angry husband and angrywife into a room by themselvesand ask them to divide up their as-sets . . . You need a mediator.”“That’s the role that the U.S.and the international community,perhaps through the Quartet orsome new entity need to play,” hesaid, adding that the conflict is an“American national security in-terest.”Ben-Ami outlined the parame-ters for a solution that will form“the framework for a deal if thereever will be a deal.” These includedthe establishment of two statesbased on pre-1967 lines with landswaps, a capital for both states inJerusalem with an international-ized Holy Basin, a demilitarizedPalestinian state with an interna-tional presence on the borders andcompensation rather than right of return for Palestinian refugees.“Pro-Israel advocacy in thiscountry needs to support and pro-mote strong presidential actionsnow, to put these ideas forwardand to press both parties to reachan agreement before it’s too late,”he said.Ben-Ami then touched on the“rules that govern the conversa-tion about Israel within the Amer-ican Jewish community,” particu-larly in regards to toeing the linebetween criticism of Israeli gov-ernment policies and the “de-le-gitimization” of the state of Israelitself.“I would argue that it isn’t crit-icism of Israeli policy that threat-ens the health of the state of Is-rael,” Ben-Ami said. “It is the poli-cies of Israel’s present govern-ment that threaten its future.”To this end, he called for openand respectful discussion withinthe American Jewish community.“To the extent that any of thedoors of the Jewish communityare barred . . . to those who ques-tion conventional wisdom on Is-rael, I think that those who aredoing the barring within theAmerican Jewish establishmentare putting the future of this com-munity at risk,” he said.Audience member SerenaEisenberg, Hillel executive direc-tor, inquired about the boundariesof the conversation J Street hopesto engender.“I don’t like the phrase ‘one statesolution’ . . . I refer to it as [a] ‘onestate nightmare,’” Ben Ami said.Other audience membersposed questions on the polariza-tion of the American Jewish com-munity and the right of Americansto comment on Israeli domesticpolitics.The event kicked off the newStanford chapter of J Street U, anational student-driven networkof activists providing an alterna-tive approach to Israel advocacy.
Contact Marwa Farag at mfarag@stanford.edu.
BEN-AMI
Continued from front page
 
IAN GARCIA-DOTY/The Stanford Daily
Jeremy Ben-Ami, founder and president of advocacy group J Street,spoke Wednesday at the Black Community Services Center on the futureof Israel and United States policy toward the Middle Eastern state.
Dauber was speaking generallyabout the United States.The ARP represents a changein theJudicial Affairs Commit-tee’s procedure regarding trialsof students who are accused of sexual assault, sexual violence,relationship violence and stalk-ing.Under the new ARP, three of the four “reviewers” would be re-quired to agree in order to decidea student’s case, which is consis-tent with current University poli-cy. The Senate and Graduate Stu-dent Council (GSC) are current-ly deliberating whether to ap-prove the pilot program ARP.Dauber commented on TheDaily website, accusing the publi-cation of publishing false accusa-tions against faculty membersafter The Daily included Laufer’squote in a Wednesday article(“Senate debates use of leftoverfunds,” April 25). Dauber wrote inthe comments that the informa-tion she gave the Senate andGraduate Student Council was“entirely correct.”A 2004 report from the Amer-ican Bar Association states that,“In civil cases, jury decisionsshould be unanimous whereverfeasible. A less-than-unanimousdecision should be accepted onlyafter jurors have deliberated for areasonable period of time and if concurred in by at least five-sixthsof the jurors.”The report qualifies that a less-er number of jurors is acceptableif agreed upon by both parties.Laufer, Elhanan and En-thoven all said that the overallmessage of Dauber’s commentswas that nowhere in the UnitedStates are civil cases required tobe decided by unanimous vote.It is unclear whether the ARPseeks to conform to Federal orCalifornia guidelines or employsa hybrid of the two. The recom-mendation to lower the standardof proof to preponderance of evi-dence came from the U.S. Depart-ment of Education Office of CivilRights, yet federal guidelines forcivil jury cases require unanimousagreement.In California a simple three-fourths majority is required,though juries on California civilcases consist of 12 jurors, while Ju-dicial Affairs currently uses four jurors. No state currently usesfour jurors for civil court cases.
Contact Brendan O’Byrne at bob yrne@stanford.edu.
 ARP
Continued from front page
 
MEHMET INONU/The Stanford Daily
Erica Castello ‘12 from the Spoken Word Collective read her poem, “Genius,” which describes the ex-perience of a victim of sexual assault. One line of the poem reads, “Rape is an active word turned pas-sive,”describing the transition of the mental state of the victim, who initially feels rage against her attack-er and then begins to question the blame of the assault, wondering if she too is culpable.“That’s one of the big steps, is letting a victim define their own experience,” said Mona Thompson ’13,publicity coordinator for the Women’s Community Center. “Understanding that somebody did somethingto you that was wrong.”Castello’s performance was part of Take Back the Night, a national and international vigil that takes placeannually in protest of sexual assault and in support of sexual assault victims. Stanford’s vigil at theWomen’s Community Center on April 25 was organized by the Peer Health Educator (PHE) program.
 The Stanford Daily
Thursday, April 26, 2012
N
3
Palestinian activist Fadi Quran ’10 seeks nonviolent path tofuture in Middle East
By STEPHEN COBBE
A
t its core, quantumphysics is a science of probabilities. Whendealing with particle un-certainties and ambigu-ous dualities, a calculated likelihoodis the closest thing to certainty. FadiQuran ’10 believes there is a lessonin this concept that can be applied tohis work in social activism.“The paths that particles takehave multiple histories, each of which you must add together inorder to predict the probabilities of where the particles may land,”Quran said. “In much the same way,as a social activist, every time I tryand plan a strategy in advance, I takeall the possible scenarios on thatpath and add them up to approxi-mate what needs to be done toachieve the most successful result.”Quran, 24, has bachelor’s de-grees in both physics and interna-tional relations from Stanford. Heis a leading figure in the burgeoningPalestinian youth movement com-mitted to achieving “freedom, jus-tice and dignity” for the Palestinianpeople. The movement, accordingto Quran, is not associated with anypolitical factions, and categoricallyrejects the use of violence to achieveits goals.Growing up in Ramallah in theWest Bank, Quran witnessed first-hand the destructiveness brought onby violent protest during the SecondPalestinian Intifada, which began in2000.“Your whole worldviewchanges,” Quran said, as he recalledbullets flying through his sister’sbedroom.The devastation of the uprisingimpressed upon him a feeling of re-sponsibility for changing the statusquo in the Occupied Territories.In recent months, Quran and hismovement have risen greatly inprominence, receiving coveragefrom news organizations such as TheWashington Post, Time Magazineand Al Jazeera. The “FreedomRides” the group undertook last No-vember received especially strongmedia attention. Inspired by thefreedom riders of the 1960s civilrights movement who defiantly rodeon segregated buses through the JimCrow South, Quran and fellow ac-tivists boarded an Israeli commuterbus in the West Bank, hoping to endwhat they see as a discriminatorysystem.Shortly after the bus departedfor Jerusalem however, it wasstopped and boarded by Israeli po-lice. All six of the activists were ar-rested for trying to enter Jerusalemwithout the proper permits.Last February at a protest in He-bron, Quran was again detained byIsraeli authorities. This time, it wason charges of obstructing a law en-forcement officer, assault and resist-ing arrest. During the incident,Quran was pepper-sprayed by po-lice. Though he was released fivedays later on bail for lack of defini-tive evidence, Quran remains underinvestigation and is due for ques-tioning again on May 3, as The Dailyreported.Being in prison had a profoundeffect on Quran. He spent his firsttwo days in solitary confinement.“When they [Israeli securityforces] brought me in, I couldn’t seeanything because of the pepperspray — the only thing open was mymind’s eye,” Quran recounted.The pain and isolation forcedQuran to evaluate his priorities.“During that time, I thoughtabout the world I wanted to see, thelegacy I wanted to leave behind,” hesaid. “I was in pain and I was afraidfor the first hour or two, but it wasone of the most eye-opening experi-ences of my life.”Quran’s resilience comes from anumber of sources. As a teenager, hewas moved by books about NelsonMandela and Martin Luther King,Jr., two activists who also spent timein prison. The Palestinian communi-ty, too, inspired young Quran.As a 10-year-old boy, he wit-nessed the selflessness of those whorisked their lives to bring food to theneedy and to assist the elderly whocouldn’t leave their homes.“Usually when we think of men-torship, we think of individuals —here in Palestine, the whole commu-nity acts organically to grow andmentor young men and women,” hesaid.But Quran’s greatest source of inspiration continues to be his moth-er and grandmothers.“One of the things that I’velearned through my life experienceis that powerful women who workhard, who nurture and care for theirfamily, friends and community, arethe key to a successful society and togreat individuals,” he said. “They arethe greatest individuals.Quran would also develop aclose connection with the facultyand students at Stanford after hisarrival in 2006. While he was apply-ing to colleges, Quran hoped to pur-sue his interests in physics whilestudying a subject that could helphim change the situation in Pales-tine. After consulting with friendsand teachers, he discovered thatStanford was a place where hecould do both.Life in California, however, wasvastly different from the one Quranhad in Palestine.“I remember days during themonth-long curfews when I had tohelp my family and neighbors getbread,” Quran said. The dichotomyof those experiences and his life atStanford, a “land of milk and honey,”was an important motivational tool.“Seeing how challenging life ac-tually is for some people gives yousomething to prepare for, to worktoward,” he said.Through classes and on-campusactivism, Quran quickly developedhis argumentative skills and ce-mented his place in the Stanfordcommunity.“One of the great things aboutStanford is that you can debate is-sues without the sense of fear thatmight be created at other places,”Quran said.As a freshman, Quran becamean active participant in the debateover whether Stanford should di-vest from companies allegedly as-sociated with the Israeli militaryoccupation of the West Bank. Tak-ing a strong stance on this contro-versial issue ensured his position atthe center of numerous campus de-bates. According to faculty mem-bers and peers, he always conduct-ed himself with restraint, open-mindedness and tolerance.“Fadi [Quran] has an incrediblecapacity to empathize with the per-spectives of others,” said AllenWeiner, senior lecturer in law, whotaught a conflict resolution semi-nar in which Quran was a student.Weiner remembers moderating adebate in one of his classes whenQuran came under substantialpressure from students on the pro-Israel side of the argument.“What was really impressiveabout Fadi was how committed hewas to finding areas of commonground and mutual understanding,while still being very staunch in hisdefense of the interests of his com-munity,” Weiner said.Joe Gettinger ’11, who be-friended Quran at Stanford, ad-mired Quran’s insistence on un-derstanding the other perspectiveon the divestment issue, but saidhe believes the most telling aspectof Quran’s character was his per-sonal efforts to bridge the gap be-tween communities.“I remember he would come toShabbat dinner to get to know peo-ple and to learn about their per-spective,” Gettinger said. “That re-ally said a lot because there wasvery little to gain politically fromsuch a move, it was really about get-ting to know the community. That’swhat makes Fadi so special.”Being at Stanford also taughtQuran important lessons in inno-vation and entrepreneurship thathe would later apply to his start-upin alternative energy, Tayara Ener-gy. Running the business, which islocated in the West Bank, requiresQuran to tap into his interdiscipli-nary education, making use of hisskills as both a community organiz-er and a scientist. Quran sees thestart-up as one step toward fulfill-ing the goal of Palestinian self-suf-ficiency.Currently, Tayara Energy’smajor projects include designing ahigh altitude wind generator toprovide electricity to rural com-munities, setting up programs totrain young people in proper recy-cling procedures to benefit refugeecamps and integrating affordablesolar panels into more constructionprojects in the Middle East.When Quran is not participatingin protests or running his company,he studies constitutional law andrevolutions at Birzeit University inRamallah, where he is pursuing hismaster’s degree. Balancing ac-tivism, entrepreneurship and aca-demics can often present a heavyload.The way Quran sees it, though,“it is not so much a question of bal-ancing as it is a question of integra-tion.”“A lot of the time at Stanfordyou’re taught to make compart-ments . . . something I’ve learned isthat actually in most cases, I can in-tegrate everything togetherthrough an interdisciplinary ap-proach,” Quran said.But that doesn’t mean life isn’tfull of stress for Quran. The day be-fore his interview with The Daily, afriend of Quran’s was arrested inBahrain. Quran spent an anxiousnight worrying about the fate of hisfriend and writing a paper due thenext day.His community, he says, has be-come accustomed to arrests.“There is always a sense of fearand anxiousness when a familymember or friend is arrested,” hesaid. “Sometimes there is a fleetingsense of despair, but it is not as rawas the first time was.”Regarding the future, Quran iscautiously optimistic, not only forthe Palestinians, but for the wholeregion. All around him, he said, hesees a new generation of MiddleEastern youth focused on socialand business entrepreneurship. Healso sees young Arab academics inunprecedented numbers pursuing“science and truth.”All this, he believes, points to-ward a tipping point in the near fu-ture in which acts of nonviolencegenerate more acts of nonviolenceuntil the Palestinian youth move-ment and others like it become full-fledged nonviolentuprisings.“Then, we will achieve peace,” hesaid.
Contact Stephen Cobbe at scobbe@ stanford.edu.
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Taking back the night
Courtesy of Fadi Quran
Inspired by the freedom riders of the 1960s civil rights movement whorode on segregated buses throughout the Jim Crow South, Quran, hold-ing a sign stating “We shall overcome” boarded Israeli buses along withfellow activists in the West Bank last November. The group was arrested.
Courtesy of Fadi Quran
Growing up in Ramallah duringthe Second Intifada inspiredQuran to change the status quo. After graduating from Stanford, hereturned home to lead a nonvio-lent youth resistance movement.
W
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