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Pell City Squadron - Apr 2012

Pell City Squadron - Apr 2012

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Civil Air Patrol - Alabama Wing
Civil Air Patrol - Alabama Wing

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Published by: Civil Air Patrol - Unit Newsletters on May 01, 2012
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05/07/2012

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Vol. 3, No. 4 April 2012
Inside this issue:
Commander’sCorner 
 
1
 
Calendar 
 
2
 
Safety
 
3
 
Standards and Eval
 
4
 
Senior’s Corner 
 
5
 
ProfessionalDevelopment
 
6
-
8
 
“Did You Know?”
 
9
 
Volunteer Magazine
 
Cadet Staff 
 
10
 
Character Development
 
Internet Sites
 
11
 
Cadet Corner 
 
12
-
14
 
W,E.S.S.
 
15
-
17
 
Trivia
 
18
 
COMMANDER’S CORNER . . .
 
From the Commander:
 
Time for growth………
 
 As the temperatures start to warm, we can see thebeginning of a new growing season.
 
Do we ever wonder if we are growing?
 
We should always be growing. Personal or professional growth is very important to us as individuals and as an organization.Growth keeps us active. Growth keeps us up to date. Growth keeps us involved.Where are opportunities for growth? They are all around us. There are severalupcoming CAP Professional Development activities in addition to our regular squadron training. The CAP Professional Development Weekend, South EastRegion Staff College, NESA, or the NCPSC are a few upcoming activities. Thereare several online courses on the CAP website that are challenging andrewarding. The Aerospace Education or “Yeager” test is one example. There areother options that are also available. You could take on additional responsibilitiesat the Squadron or Wing level. You could work to get qualified in a new aircraft.You could work on an additional FAA rating.
 
There are many opportunities out there to grow. Don’t miss the growing season.
 
Most people practice until they get it right. That is not enough.
 
We need to practice until we don’t get it wrong.
 
Jim Gosnell
 
Commander AL
-
118
 
SquadronCommander—Maj. Jim Gosnell
 
Deputy Commander for Cadet Programs
-
Capt. Cindy Bennett
 
“To serve America by developing our Nation’s youth; accomplishing
local, state and national emergency and humanitarian missions; and
educating our citizens on the impact of aviation and space.”
- CAP Mission Statement
2nd Lt. Elizabeth Shurbutt,
 
PAO and Newsletter Editor 
 
LTooney@cableone.net
 
 
 
Sun
 
Mon
 
Tue
 
Wed
 
Thu
 
Fri
 
Sat
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
Cadet Mt.
 
18:00
 
PT at LakesidePark
 
Seniors Mt.
 
18:30
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
HappyBirthday,Roy Smith
 
10
 
HappyBirthday,Alan Furr 
 
11
 
12
 
HappyBirthday,Ron Turner 
 
Cadet Mt.
 
18:00
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
IncomeTaxes Due
 
17
 
18
 
HappyBirthday,RichardBurke
 
19
 
Cadet Mt.
 
18:00
 
Seniors Mt.18:30
 
20
 
HappyBirthday,JonathanWatkins
 
21
 
22
HappyBirthday,Jerrod Finlay
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
Cadet Mt.
 
18:00
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
HappyBirthday,Daniel Iddins
 
30
 
April 2012April 2012 
Calendar . . . Page 2
 
Cadet Schedule and Uniform for April 2012:
 
 April 5 — PT, Safety Brief, Practice Drill at Lakeside Park
-
(Uniform—P.T.)
 
 April 12— Leadership (Dress Blues)
 
 April 19— Character Development (BDU’s)
 
 April 26— Aerospace (BDU’s)
 
 April 20
-
22—WESS
 
WESS
 — 
Vigilant Warrior
WESS
 
 
Safety . . . Page 3
 
-
Reminder: Read the newsletter and receive a Safety Briefing Credit.Please email Ron Harlan at
-
reh1685@aol.com
 
We all know March to be the month with strong winds and the time to get out your kites. But, as with much of our folklore, March is not the windiest month. No, April actually exceeds the average winds in March by 25%according to my Google of this phenomenon. So I don’t feel that I’m too late in talking about polishing our skills incross
-
wind landings. I was fortunate to fly quite a lot in March, and I will have to admit that I was challengedrepeatedly with strong crosswind components. Our flying is predominantly done into and out of single runwayairports so our probability of encountering a significant crosswind is actually fairly high. I read a lot of aviationpublications as I am sure you do too. I recently ran across an article by Chris Hope, an experienced andextremely well qualified instructor on cross wind landings and I would like to share some of his insights oncrosswind procedures.
 
“All of us had cross
wind landings mastered at one time. And, if you fly a plane with the third wheel at the back end instead of the front end, you have never lost that skill. But I find from the flight reviews I conduct, that many  pilots have let that skill drift away (similar to the way we let the centerline drift away on short final.) So here aresome techniques that you might have heard and forgotten, or that you might have heard slightly differently, tohelp you get the plane aligned with the centerline of the runway, and to keep it on the centerline while on final and through and after touchdown.
 
Since this column is looking at crosswind landings, let’s assume that you can figure out the glideslope and airspeed parts of the pattern, and look only at centerline placement, and aircraft alignment.
 
When I talk about looking at the runway, the runway picture I am talking about is the entire centerline. I want to visually line up the far end of the runway with the near end of the runway. Then I want the point on the airplanenose that is in front of my eyes (not the center of the cowling) lined up with both the near end and far end of therunway. It is nonsensical to talk about lining up with the approach end of the runway. No matter where you are inspace, if you are flying to a single point, you are lined up with that point. You are only lined up with the runway centerline if you have all three points lined up.
 
Some pilots like to fly in a crab all the way down the final approach course, and then align the aircraft with therunway at the last instant. And some pilots like to align the aircraft with the centerline as soon as they roll out theturn from base to final. Both systems work, but both have some drawbacks.
 
Looking first at the “crab
on
final 
and 
kick 
it 
out 
at 
the
end” technique. Plus side – the airplane is incoordinated flight all the way down the final approach course. No slips, no skids and therefore no extra power requirements. Also, this is the same technique you use in flying rectangular courses. Down side – lots of changesto the airplane at the last minute to get the plane pitched correctly and on centerline and maintaining the runway alignment. It can be done, and it is beautiful when it works well. But there is definitely some quick movement going on here.
 
Now let’s look at the infamous “wing 
low’ method. Plus side
we can get the correct rudder and aileron figured out when still away from the runway. Down side – we are in a slip, which is a drag producer, which requires anincrease in power. But I generally teach my students to use this technique initially because I believe the plussesoutweigh the minuses. From the time you roll out on final, if you are lining up the far and near ends of the runway over the point on the cowling, the changes in the flare will be minor. But, yes, you probably need a bit more power on final to overcome the drag.
 
So as you are beginning to flare, continue to look all the way down the runway, watching for the aircraft drift and for the nose to slowly turn (usually left). And consciously tell yourself that you will probably need more aileronand rudder at the end so you can ready for it. Don’t be nervous about touching down first on the up
wind mainwheel. Count yourself as an expert the first time it happens. Just leave the controls in (and increasing) all the way through the rollout and you will start to see the centerline right in front of you, straight ahead. Happy landings, fly safe!” 
 
Whichever method you are accustomed to, April will be a great month to practice your technique. If you feel youneed a little refresher on the whole concept, grab one of our CFI’s and go out and find a crosswind!
 
Fly Safe, Ron Harlan,118 Safety Officer 
 

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