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Scott Fullwiler: What Should Economists Have Learned from the Crisis?

Scott Fullwiler: What Should Economists Have Learned from the Crisis?

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Published by Mitch Green
In this free and public lecture, Dr. Scott T. Fullwiler will assess where the profession has been and where it is headed, and most importantly, whether it has learned anything at all since the crisis.

The event is scheduled for 7pm, May 4 in Haag Hall Room 301 on the Volker Campus of the University of Missouri- Kansas City, 5120 Rockhill Rd, Kansas City, MO 64111. The event, a partnership between the Bernardin-Haskell Lectures Fund, the UMKC Economics Department, and the UMKC Economics Club is free and open to the public.
In this free and public lecture, Dr. Scott T. Fullwiler will assess where the profession has been and where it is headed, and most importantly, whether it has learned anything at all since the crisis.

The event is scheduled for 7pm, May 4 in Haag Hall Room 301 on the Volker Campus of the University of Missouri- Kansas City, 5120 Rockhill Rd, Kansas City, MO 64111. The event, a partnership between the Bernardin-Haskell Lectures Fund, the UMKC Economics Department, and the UMKC Economics Club is free and open to the public.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Mitch Green on May 02, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/08/2012

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 Bernardin-Haskell Lecture
 
Wartburg Economist Dr. Scott T. Fullwiler to present a Bernardin-Haskell lecture:
“What Should Economists HaveLearned from the Crisis?”
 
Kansas City, MO
Nearly four years after the worst financial crisis in decades the worldeconomy is still struggling to recover. Since the crash, millions of people have lost their jobs, homes, and savings. Government revenues have fallen sharply at the federal, stateand local levels, resulting in
perceived or real “solvency” crises.
While many arestruggling to recover from the Great Recession, large corporations, especially within thefinancial industry, are reaping record profits and huge executive bonuses. Dismay in theseeming disparity between the return to normal for big business versus everyone elsehas sparked powerful protest movements, such as Occupy Wall Street and The TeaParty. Interestingly enough, despite the failure of mainstream economic theory inpredicting the recent global financial crisis or providing effective policy prescriptions tohelp with the recovery, the majority of the profession appears to have returned to
“business as usual” following a brief period of uncharacteristic humility.
In this free andpublic lecture, Dr. Scott T. Fullwiler will assess where the profession has been and whereit is headed, and most importantly, whether it has learned anything at all since the crisis.The event is scheduled for 7pm, May 4 in Haag Hall Room 301 on the Volker Campus of the University of Missouri- Kansas City, 5120 Rockhill Rd, Kansas City, MO 64111. Theevent, a partnership between the Bernardin-Haskell Lectures Fund, the UMKCEconomics Department, and the UMKC Economics Club is free and open to the public.
About the Lecturer:
Scott Fullwiler holds the James A. Leach Chair in Banking and Monetary Economics andis an Associate Professor of Economics at Wartburg College in Iowa. He is also the Co-
Director of the College’s Social
Entrepreneurship Program. At Wartburg, he teachescourses in financial management, investments and financial markets, bankmanagement, financial modeling and valuation, advanced macroeconomics, socialcapital markets, social entrepreneurship, and the modern monetary system.Fullwiler's research background has been largely in the field of monetary economics,particularly where financial institutions, central banks and governments interact, such asin money markets, national payments systems, government debt operations and centralbank operations. His research in these areas has been required reading in some PhD

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