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High Tide Issue 7, May 2012

High Tide Issue 7, May 2012

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Published by The Hi-Tide

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Published by: The Hi-Tide on May 04, 2012
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01/25/2015

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Volume LXXVVVIII Issue 6 - May 4, 2012
La Jolla High School • 750 Nautilus Street • La Jolla • 92037
Celebrating La Jolla High
s 90th Year
ASBUpdate
In This Issue
Race to the Top: A Look at Classroom Diversity

the Bands
Tonight, 7 p.m.Parker Auditorium
News 1, 10Genome MappingOpinions 2-3

Features 4-5

Student Focus 6-7

Sports 8-9

Ceramics Feature
 V 
ikings,Interested in leadership op-portunities while having a greattime sharing rewarding expe-riences with a unique group of friends? ASB applications forthe 2012 to 2013 school yearcan be found online under thetab “ASB Forms.” Anybody iswelcome to apply. There is amandatory meeting May 8 at7 a.m. before school when ap-plications are due.The school’s First AnnualFilm Festival is this month onMay 11. Come Friday eve-ning at 7 p.m. to watch La Jolla High’s up and coming 
filmmakers share their lat
-est works. A requirement wasto include a potato, so expectto see interesting uses of thespud. It will be an entertaining evening packed with surprisesand prizes, so make sure tocome and support all of theparticipants!Seniors! Prom is approach-ing quickly on May 25 at thePrado. Tickets for non-se-nior dates go on sale May 11for $55. We hope to see youthere.Thanks for your time andapply for ASB for next year!Sincerely,
Erik Vanstrum
 ASB President 
By Owen Miller
Staff Writer 
Dodgeball is a true spectatorsport, brutal and grueling. It isa simple game: throw, catch,and dodge. If done successful-ly, a team can be unstoppable.The sport is not usually of-fered in high schools, exceptfor the occasional game inP.E.However, students (as well asteachers) at La Jolla High hadthe opportunity to participatein a dodgeball tournamenthosted by ASB last week.Many teams participated butthe two teams that prevailed
and made it to the finals were
teams composed of studentathletes: one of water polo and volleyball boys and the other of basketball and football boys.Throughout the week, theexcitement surrounding thetournament escalated untilit peaked on Friday in threeheated games in which the wa-ter polo and volleyball playersdominated.The coalition of water poloand volleyball players did notlose a single match during theentire series and defeated theircompetition with ease.
Dodgeball comes to LJHS
By Wendy Nettleton and Jordan Linsky
Copy Editor and Staff Writer 
Walking the halls of La JollaHigh School, it is apparentthat the racial diversity withinthe individual classrooms is notrepresentative of the studentpopulation as a whole. Out of the 1,526 students attending La Jolla High School, 449, or29%, are Hispanic. However,these numbers are not repre-sentative of the AP classes.The AP program was de-signed to give students anopportunity to earn collegecredits and stand out in thecollege admission process. Ina random selection of four APclasses, the number of Hispan-ic students within the classes is26 out of 402, or 6%. Whenlooking into the numbers forthe regular counterparts of thefour AP classes, it was discov-ered that 41% of the studentsare Hispanic. The data revealsa staggering deviation in La Jolla High School’s academicprograms.Cindy Santana, a Hispanicsenior in regular economicsand British literature, sharedher thoughts. “In this class
[British Literature] specifi
-cally...it’s a mix between whitekids and Mexican kids. But, inan AP class, I’ve noticed thatsometimes there [are] morewhite kids than Mexicans. Ev-ery now and then you see onetry-hard Mexican...but mostof the time you never really seethem: it’s just white kids.”She continued to elabo-rate about why this is occur-ring, saying that “I do notknow whether it’s because theMexican kids aren’t trying, orif they’re intimidated by thecompetition... Most of [thewhite kids] are really smart,and even then, if they aren’tsmart, they are still white kids.It is majority versus minority,so I’m guessing that is why[Mexicans] aren’t there.”Andy Hill, a Caucasian se-nior, has a schedule with bothAP and regular classes.Hill responded to the ques-tion of whether he noticed aracial difference between APclasses and regular classes bystating, “Yeah, I think it is lessabout race than it is about peo-ple that want to be there anddo not want to be there. But,there is a race difference. It isentirely someone’s decision totake an AP class or not.”Adding to that, Hill said, “Ihave seen plenty of minori-ties in AP classes, and theywork hard and do well. But,there is a stereotype and I feellike people feel comfortableblending into that stereotypeof minorities and they do notwant to take AP or higher levelclasses.”Take for example, AP versusregular Biology. Biology is arequired course for all studentsat La Jolla. For the two AP Bi-ology classes, three out of 68,or 4%, are Hispanic students.On the other hand, the regu-lar biology classes have 117Hispanic students out of 243students, or 48%.Mrs. Tenenbaum, who hastaught AP and regular biologyfor many years, does notice thedifference. “I do not know that[Hispanic students] are being directed to take AP Bio, even if they do well in the regular bioclasses…They are not alwaysadvised by teachers or counsel-ors to take AP classes…and somaybe they should be encour-aged more, especially if theydo well. I also think there is afriend thing. If your friend isn’ttaking the class or is taking theclass, there is more likelihoodthat you will take that class.”She continues, “Everyoneneeds to make a better effort.Kids at La Jolla need to work on being more inclusive…youhave these cliques, and thesecliques are really hard to break through.”One Hispanic student inan AP class (and the only His-panic student in this particularclass) felt as though he had theadvantage. He said that he wasable to represent Hispanicsand that when he did well in
the class it was a good reflec
-tion on him as a student. Thisstudent, who prefers to stay
anonymous, definitely notices
that he is the only one and he

May 11, 7 p.m.Parker Auditorium
eventually come to an end.We are pleased to pass onour positions to current juniorsSarah Devermann and Tim
Rayner. We are confident in
Sarah and Tim’s abilities andare sure that the
 Hi-Tide
willcontinue to capture the spiritof La Jolla High. In fact, weare sure all of the upcoming staff members for the 2012 to2013 year will strive to bring  you an improved publication.As always, we thank you for your readership. Many latenights were spent creating each issue, and we hope thatall of the time we placed intothe paper was apparent.Our time to shape and cre-ate the paper may be coming to an end, but we look forwardto the evolution of the
 Hi-Tide
 in years to come.Sincerely,
Olivia Polger and Ashley Wei
 Editors-in-Chief 
RememberingJunior Seaupg. 9
Letter from the Editors
Dear Readers,Another year of school andof the
 Hi-Tide
has come and
gone; we have reached the fi
-nal issue of this academic year.As senior staff members, weare preparing to say farewellto room 501 as graduation ap-proaches ever nearer. Journalism has been a largepart of our lives for the pastthree years. We can still recall joining the paper as staff writ-ers, ascending to page editors,and eventually taking on theEditor-in-Chief positions.All of these roles have taughtus about how integral everymember of the staff is to thepaper’s success. The paper hastaught both of us a tremen-dous amount about leadershipand commitment, and we areleaving it behind with greatpride in what we have learnedand achieved.Though we wish we couldremain Editors-in-Chief foranother year, all things must
 Photo Courtesy of Daniel HamiltonContinued on pg. 10
 
 Photo Courtesy of Hi-Tide Staff 
AP Biology students in Mrs. Tenenbaum’s sixth period class.

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