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INTERACTION BETWEEN DUCKWEEDS AND THEIR DIATOM EPIPHYTES

INTERACTION BETWEEN DUCKWEEDS AND THEIR DIATOM EPIPHYTES

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Published by Nina Desianti
The majority of epiphytic diatoms are not specific for particular plants. One exception is Lemnicola hungarica (Grunow) Round and Basson 1997 and the duckweeds, small floating aquatic plants in the family Araceae. This research was conducted to examine the habitat specificity of Lemnicola, which involved both a field survey of natural habitats and an experiment in a University of Oklahoma Aquatic Research Facility pond. From the field survey, Lemnicola occurred on three all encountered duckweeds, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza and Wollfia sp., from eleven sites in Oklahoma. Lemnicola was always present but not always the dominant species, and particular species (Cocconeis placentula, Diadesmis confervacea and Nitzschia perminuta) were also commonly present. The experiment used different nutrient enrichment and shading treatments in small floating chambers with duckweeds and plastic artificial substrates. Nutrient treatments were phosphorus, nitrogen, a combination of phosphorus and nitrogen and an un-enriched control, and the shading treatments were shaded and un-shaded. Among nutrients, phosphorus (either alone or in combination with nitrogen) altered diatom assemblage composition. Lemnicola was more abundant with phosphorus enrichment and under shade. Lemnicola colonized floating artificial substrates when phosphorus was enriched, indicating a nutrient interaction with duckweeds involving phosphorus. Color of plastic (light transmission) of the artificial substrates had no effect, indicating that refracted light is important to duckweed epiphytes. This research supported the occurrence of a characteristic diatom flora for duckweeds and demonstrated that Lemnicola hungarica may colonize other substrates, given appropriate conditions (i.e., high phosphorus and shade).
The majority of epiphytic diatoms are not specific for particular plants. One exception is Lemnicola hungarica (Grunow) Round and Basson 1997 and the duckweeds, small floating aquatic plants in the family Araceae. This research was conducted to examine the habitat specificity of Lemnicola, which involved both a field survey of natural habitats and an experiment in a University of Oklahoma Aquatic Research Facility pond. From the field survey, Lemnicola occurred on three all encountered duckweeds, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza and Wollfia sp., from eleven sites in Oklahoma. Lemnicola was always present but not always the dominant species, and particular species (Cocconeis placentula, Diadesmis confervacea and Nitzschia perminuta) were also commonly present. The experiment used different nutrient enrichment and shading treatments in small floating chambers with duckweeds and plastic artificial substrates. Nutrient treatments were phosphorus, nitrogen, a combination of phosphorus and nitrogen and an un-enriched control, and the shading treatments were shaded and un-shaded. Among nutrients, phosphorus (either alone or in combination with nitrogen) altered diatom assemblage composition. Lemnicola was more abundant with phosphorus enrichment and under shade. Lemnicola colonized floating artificial substrates when phosphorus was enriched, indicating a nutrient interaction with duckweeds involving phosphorus. Color of plastic (light transmission) of the artificial substrates had no effect, indicating that refracted light is important to duckweed epiphytes. This research supported the occurrence of a characteristic diatom flora for duckweeds and demonstrated that Lemnicola hungarica may colonize other substrates, given appropriate conditions (i.e., high phosphorus and shade).

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Nina Desianti on May 05, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/09/2012

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UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMAGRADUATE COLLEGEINTERACTIONS BETWEEN DUCKWEEDS AND THEIR DIATOM EPIPHYTESA THESISSUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE FACULTYin partial fulfillment of the requirements for theDegree of MASTER OF SCIENCEByNINA DESIANTINorman, Oklahoma2012
 
 INTERACTIONS BETWEEN DUCKWEEDS AND THEIR DIATOM EPIPHYTESA THESIS APPROVED FOR THEDEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND MICROBIOLOGYBY______________________________Dr. Elizabeth A. Bergey, Chair______________________________Dr. Wayne J. Elisens______________________________Dr. Rebecca Sherry
 
 © Copyright by NINA DESIANTI 2012All Rights Reserved.

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