Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
BHR Spending Ans

BHR Spending Ans

Ratings: (0)|Views: 10|Likes:
Published by AffNeg.Com

More info:

Published by: AffNeg.Com on Dec 21, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/17/2009

pdf

text

original

 
HBR 
AT: Spending DA
AT: Spending DA .........................................................................................................................................................................................1AT: Spending [1/3] .......................................................................................................................................................................................2AT: Spending [2/3] .......................................................................................................................................................................................3AT: Spending [3/3] .......................................................................................................................................................................................41AR Spending Ext 1 Econ Low ................................................................................................................................................................51AR Spending Ext 2 Aid Now ..................................................................................................................................................................61AR Spending Ext 3 Other Spending .......................................................................................................................................................71AR Spending Ext 6 Deficit Spending .....................................................................................................................................................81AR Spending Ext 7 No Impact ...............................................................................................................................................................91Hooch 4 Life
 
HBR 
AT: Spending [1/3]
1. The Economy is crashing – housing market, oil, and health careSanders 7/10
/08 San Francisco Chronicle
 
]
 America's sky is falling. A
Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll conducted last month found that
78 percent of Americans think that the country isheading in the wrong direction.
Of course, almost 4 in 5 Americans think the country is heading to heck in a handbasket. The news media are stuck in one gear 
when itcomes to reporting economic news - Armageddon.
As Hillary Rodham Clinton supporters so aptly noted, many journalists are besotted with Barack Obama. Thatmakes them open to any bad news that can be tacked onto Republican George W. Bush. But
it's more than liberal bias. Journalists are convinced that theAmerican economy is collapsing and going down the tube, because our industry is collapsing and going down the tube.
So if you saythe economy is "slowing," as Republican presidential candidate John McCain has said, you're insensitive. If you are in touch, you are supposed to ignore the 0.6-percent GDP growth inthe fourth-quarter of 2007 and 1 percent growth in the first-quarter of 2008, because that belies the belief that the U.S. economy is in recession. Remember the "misery index" - thecombined rate of unemployment and inflation that peaked at 22 percent under President Jimmy Carter? Forget it. Not enough misery. In 2004, Democratic presidential candidate JohnKerry had to throw in extra statistics to inflate the Bush misery index, because the combined unemployment and I nflation rate was about 8 percent. Lately, news stories report onAmerican fears about inflation, without reporting the rate of inflation. It's about 4.2 percent. With the unemployment rate at 5.5 percent, the "misery index" is just under 10 percent. Yes,gasoline prices are up. Granted, higher 
prices at the pump are forcing some Americans to cut back and have had a ripple effect throughout theeconomy.
After years of arguing that greener energy policies don't hurt the economy, but instead create jobs, Democrats and talking heads should be cooing about the new economichorizons unfolding
. The housing bubble burst.
A lot of 
people -
including this writer 
- have seen the value of their homes drop,
and those who have tosell quickly won't get the price they expected two years ago. Is there anyone who did not think that eventually housing prices would deflate? Is there a new law of economics that says:What goes up cannot come down? The boost in the foreclosure rate to close to 2.5 percent shows the raw side of a market correction made worse by shabby lending practices that luredsome people to buy homes they could not afford. Some families will experience the heartbreak of losing those homes, but also some families, who had been priced out of the market, nowcan reach for that dream. Thanks to improved federal regulations, they stand a better chance of holding onto it. Yes, there is bad news
. The stock market is down and thehousing market probably won't begin to bounce back this
year. The federal deficit is expected to hit $400 billion this year. Worse yet, Washington has promisedSocial Security and Medicare benefits without paying for them. As a result, according to former Comptroller General David Walker, every American owns a $175,000 share of UncleSam's unfunded liabilities.
Health care costs have soared - and that has made it more expensive for businesses to operate and governmentsto provide services.
It doesn't matter that people with cancer and other serious illnesses stand a better chance of beating the disease, and enjoy a higher quality of life. Americansexpect health care costs to rise more slowly, even if they are getting considerably more effective care. And it doesn't help when some adults have to work two part-time jobs to make endsmeet, but don't qualify for health care insurance at either. Do I worry about where this country is headed? Who doesn't? But what concerns me is that
Americans keepexpecting more goodies from their government - with someone else always paying for it.
The other thing that worries me: We have no idea howgood we have it.
2. Alternative Energy Aid Now – Hydro PowerNHA 6/25
/08 National Hydropower Association
[House Appropriations Committee Approves Substantial Funding for DOE Waterpower Program,http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/partner/story?cid=3340&id=52886] 
Washington, DC (June 25, 2008) - The National Hydropower Association is pleased to report that the House AppropriationsCommittee has allocated $40 million to the Department of Energy's R&D waterpower program. The measure represents a 400 percent increase over the previous allocation and represents a $37 million increase over the administration's budget request. "TheAppropriations Committee showed tremendous leadership today by significantly increasing funding for the DOE waterpower R&D program," stated Linda Church Ciocci, NHA's executive director. "This funding revitalizes the federal program and pavesthe way for bringing new, clean hydropower technologies online in the next 20 years."
3. Federal Spending on other issuesA. IraqSchenwar 6/21
/08 Scoop Independent News
[Maya, Congress Funds Another Year of War, http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0806/S00300.htm
 
]
In a step that sealed the fate of Iraq war funding until next June, the House of Representatives voted on Thursday to approve $162 billion for the occupation, with no strings attached. The vote follows a series of compromises and revisions over the past twomonths, ultimately resulting in major concessions from Democrats. [Continues] White House Budget Director Jim Nussle wasequally enthusiastic about the bill, telling Congressional Quarterly that the administration "obviously" approved of it. Thelegislation satisfies Bush's demands not only for fiscal year 2008 funding, but also for about half of the funding needed to supportstatus quo operations in Iraq for 2009.2Hooch 4 Life
 
HBR 
AT: Spending [2/3]
B. NASAPasadena Star-News 7/6
/08
[NASA: Don't blow support of Congress, http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/opinions/ci_9803622
 
]
 FOR NASA, after years of struggling for more funding, the planets finally may be aligning. It's vital that the agency not doanything to squander this chance. Last week a Senate committee recommended a big boost of $2.6 billion in NASA's budget,including an extra $1 billion to speed up its next manned space program, Constellation. The full House approved the sameincrease in legislation it overwhelmingly passed earlier in the month.
Accelerating Constellation's development is crucial. Otherwise, NASA is projecting afive-year gap between the retirement of space shuttles in 2010 and the launch of the next manned program. In that interim, U.S. astronauts would be stuck hitching rides aboard Russianspace vehicles. The U.S. space program would be vulnerable to the whims of an authoritarian regime and vehicles that have recently suffered mechanical failures. A longer gap also wouldlead to greater job losses - including at the Kennedy Space Center, where up to 6,400 jobs are on the line.
4. Disads not intrinsic – there no reason why a congressman can’t pass our plan and cut funding in another area to offset thefederal deficit5. No Link – Federal funding for alternative energy programs would be a tradeoff from other programsKRNV 7/9
/08 News Station
[Senator Ensign offers a compromise on renewable energy, http://www.krnv.com/Global/story.asp?S=8643877]
 Senator John Ensign offered a compromise Tuesday that would encourage the development of renewable energy, expedite passageof the Housing bill and end concerns over "paying for" his amendment. "We all agree that as a country we need to encourage thedevelopment of renewable energy," Ensign said. "It is becoming clear that Senate Democrats will not allow a vote on thisimportant amendment and, as a result, are blocking solar, wind and other renewable projects from moving forward." Ensign'scompromise would reduce spending across the board, except for veterans, to pay for $8 billion of renewable energy tax incentives.This would represent a tiny fraction of federal spending, approximately a twentieth of a percent reduction in the budget over 10years.
6. Deficit Spending is good for economic growthMitchell
3/15/
05
 
 Heritage's chief expert on tax policy and the economy, PHD, Heritage Foundation
 
[Daniel J, The Impact of GovernmentSpending on Economic Growth, http://www.heritage.org/research/budget/bg1831.cfm
 
]
The Keynesian Controversy. The economics of government spending is not limited to cost-benefit analysis. There is also theKeynesian debate. In the 1930s, John Maynard Keynes argued that government spending—particularly increases in govern mentspending—boosted growth by injecting purchasing power into the economy.[2] According to Keynes, government could reverseeconomic downturns by borrowing money from the private sector and then returning the money to the private sector throughvarious spending programs. This “pump priming” concept did not necessarily mean that government should be big. Instead,Keynesian theory asserted that government spend ing—especially deficit spending—could provide short-term stimulus to help enda recession or depression. The Keynesians even argued that poli cymakers should be prepared to reduce govern ment spending oncethe economy recovered in order to prevent inflation, which they believed would result from too much economic growth. They even postulated that there was a tradeoff between inflation and unemployment (the Phillips Curve) and that government officials shouldincrease or decrease government spending to steer the economy between too much of one or too much of the other. Keynesianeconomics was very influential for several decades and dominated public policy from the 1930s–1970s. The theory has since fallenout of favor, but it still influences policy discussions, particularly on whether or not changes in government spending havetransitory economic effects. For instance, some lawmakers use Keynesian analysis to argue that higher or lower levels of government spending will stimu late or dampen economic growth. 3Hooch 4 Life

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->