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P. 1
I Remember Nothing

I Remember Nothing

Ratings:

3.38

(190)
|Views: 648|Likes:
Published by VintageAnchor
Nora Ephron returns with her first book since the astounding success of I Feel Bad About My Neck, taking a cool, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, bemoaning the vicissitudes of modern life, and recalling with her signature clarity and wisdom everything she hasn’t (yet) forgotten.Ephron writes about falling hard for a way of life (“Journalism: A Love Story”) and about breaking up even harder with the men in her life (“The D Word”); lists “Twenty-five Things People Have a Shocking Capacity to Be Surprised by Over and Over Again” (“There is no explaining the stock market but people try”; “You can never know the truth of anyone’s marriage, including your own”; “Cary Grant was Jewish”; “Men cheat”); reveals the alarming evolution, a decade after she wrote and directed You’ve Got Mail, of her relationship with her in-box (“The Six Stages of E-Mail”); and asks the age-old question, which came first, the chicken soup or the cold? All the while, she gives candid, edgy voice to everything women who have reached a certain age have been thinking . . . but rarely acknowledging.Filled with insights and observations that instantly ring true—and could have come only from Nora Ephron—I Remember Nothing is pure joy.
Nora Ephron returns with her first book since the astounding success of I Feel Bad About My Neck, taking a cool, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, bemoaning the vicissitudes of modern life, and recalling with her signature clarity and wisdom everything she hasn’t (yet) forgotten.Ephron writes about falling hard for a way of life (“Journalism: A Love Story”) and about breaking up even harder with the men in her life (“The D Word”); lists “Twenty-five Things People Have a Shocking Capacity to Be Surprised by Over and Over Again” (“There is no explaining the stock market but people try”; “You can never know the truth of anyone’s marriage, including your own”; “Cary Grant was Jewish”; “Men cheat”); reveals the alarming evolution, a decade after she wrote and directed You’ve Got Mail, of her relationship with her in-box (“The Six Stages of E-Mail”); and asks the age-old question, which came first, the chicken soup or the cold? All the while, she gives candid, edgy voice to everything women who have reached a certain age have been thinking . . . but rarely acknowledging.Filled with insights and observations that instantly ring true—and could have come only from Nora Ephron—I Remember Nothing is pure joy.

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Publish date: Nov 9, 2010
Added to Scribd: May 09, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780307595621
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04/12/2014

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bettyandboo reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I Remember Nothing is narrated by Nora Ephron herself - so given her recent passing, hearing her distinctive voice is kind of bittersweet at first.

Jarring, even.

But the humor more than makes up for it, of course, and listening to this three CD recording is like listening to an old friend (or a new one who feels like an old friend). In this audiobook, Ephron peppers her personal essays with phrases such as "I have to tell you," and "I am not proud of this."

I Remember Nothing almost has the feeling of being two books in one. The first part is Nora recounting all the everyday as well as significant and historical happenings in her life that she can't remember or may only remember trivial details of.

And we're talking MAJOR events. Things like meeting Eleanor Roosevelt, being outside the White House on the evening Nixon resigned, and covering the Beatles as they performed on The Ed Sullivan Show.

"On some level, my life has been wasted on me. After all, if I can't remember it, who can?" she says.

These recollections (or, what Ephron can recall about them) are among the best part of I Remember Nothing. The rest is more along the lines of reflections and musings on various topics such as divorce, email (a section that feels a little dated), thinning hair, and other vestiges of growing older. The essay about having a meatloaf named after her in a restaurant is especially well-done, and there's a poignant story about her plans for a potential inheritance from an uncle that will resonate with every writer. (Ephron was struggling with a screenplay at the time and the windfall from the uncle would have made that go away. We would have also not have had one of our most classic movies.)

There is a passage about her being on her deathbed, which is just downright eerie now. And the ending of I Remember Nothing, two lists of "What I Won't Miss" and "What I Will Miss" (after she has gone) is bittersweet and prompts a bit of reflection on what one will miss (and not miss) of one's own life.

Still, at the risk of seeming to speaking ill of the dead, I Remember Nothing feels a little ... disjointed. If you're familiar with Ephron's movies and her writing, you won't find much new ground here. What you will find is Ephron's trademark snark and sardonic wit, some good entertainment and laughs if you're in a bit of a funk and need a quick hit of humor to relieve you ... and an ironic, bittersweet reminder that despite her feeling of growing old, Ephron really wasn't as old as she thought she was.
sirroger reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I enjoyed it. Yes, it's light and short, and yes, there is more profound writing out there. But sometimes it's fun to read humorous little stories about meatloaf or Lillian Hellman. And when you're in the mood for that lighter fare, you can read Mindy Kaling's book, and you can read Nora Ephron's "I Feel Bad About My Neck" and "I Remember Nothing." And they will be enjoyable.
nivramkoorb reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Having read a couple other books by her, I wanted to read this. It was sad because I know that she wrote this while she was dying. Still it had her usual humor and although not all of the essays worked, it was worthwhile as a short quick read. For those who haven't read her other essays I strongly suggest them. We need more clever humorous writers to help bring a smile and a laugh to our daily lives. Nothing wrong with that.
tloeffler_3 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This is Ephron's last book, a collection of essays, most of which had been printed elsewhere. I haven't read much of her stuff; there is a recollection stuck in my head that I read something of hers once and didn't like it, but I can't elaborate any further than that. I'm not even sure how this ended up on my shelf to start with, but it won the lottery for the next "kitchen book" so I read it. I really enjoyed it. I could relate to so many things in her essays, and some of them had me laughing out loud. When I read the last two chapters, titled "What I Won't Miss" and "What I Will Miss," I remembered that she had died this year, and it made me sad. Still, an enjoyable book, and recommended for a light & amusing read.
pollgott reviewed this
Rated 2/5
It probably isn’t fair of me to criticize this book, since its genre is one that I’m predisposed not to like: semi-humorous reflections on the banalities of life, with an occasional recipe thrown in for good measure. I read it only because it was the selection for my neighborhood book club. And it didn’t change my opinion of the genre. The book has some poignant moments, in particular near the end where the 69-year Ephron comtemplates the fact that she has only a relatively short time left and lists the things she’ll miss and the things she won’t. (As it turns out, she died less than two years after the book’s publication. ) But overall, Ephron’s essays on meatloaf and Teflon and the way her hair twist up in the back just struck me as insubstantial and not that interesting.
deadgirl_1 reviewed this
Nothing spectacular; light and enjoyable. There were some bits in there that shot straight into my heart, but that's only because I have had similar experiences with what the author wrote. So at least I have that.I bought this only after she has died, so her two lists at the end of the book, "What I Won't Miss" and "What I Will Miss" made me feel quite sad. Sad but inspired.
kitber reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Well worth reading, funny, and true to life.
karenmerguerian reviewed this
Rated 3/5
There's one really good essay in this--the one about how she falls in love with journalism. All the rest seemed kind of throwaway to me, I didn't feel she had anything new to say.
periodista_1 reviewed this
Rated 1/5
Ephron has exhausted readers' patience with this phony book. What were the editor and publisher thinking? Was there an editor?I borrowed this from the library, where it was on display, and I'm still embarrassed to say I read most of it. It must have taken me 30 minutes.The essay on her start in journalism is well written and witty, but haven't I read it before in one of her oldest books? Perhaps I'm thinking of a profile of the female publisher of the NY Post.Was she ever really a journalist? That is, was she ever capable of writing about something other than herself? The evidence here is not pretty.
meggo_2 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I like Ephron's style of storytelling - crisp and light, irreverent and sassy. This is another volume of autobiographical sketches from her life, told in a snappy way that made for a quick read. Entertaining, and perfect weekend reading. As I shelved this I noted that Ephron's books tend to be of a size - slim - that makes for a very fast read.

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P. 1
I Remember Nothing