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Documents From the U.S. Espionage Den v16

Documents From the U.S. Espionage Den v16

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Published by Michael Best

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Published by: Michael Best on May 10, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/10/2012

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IN
THE
NANE
OF
GOD,THE
#ERCIFUL
AND THE COMPASSIONATE
.
TELEGRAMS NO. TEHRAN 10 752 ,TEHRAN
10.3
42
,!10Sr3W
I
221
56
,TEHRAN 09503 ,TEHRAN
9891
6
,USICA
50253 AN0TEHRAN
58831
WERE THE LAST COPIES
OF
THEIR ORI-GINAL TEXTS AND,THUS,VERY DULL IN COLORPTHEREF-
ORE
THEIR
PRINTING
AND
PHOTOGRAPHING
IN
BOOKSWERE NOT
FAYDRABLY
POSSIBLE.FOR
THIS
REASON,THJABOVE-MENTIONED DOCUMENTS
WERE
R&-TYPED.
1
 
CONFIDENTIALMEMORANDUM TO THE FILESSUBJECT: Alternative Views from the ProvincesSUMMARYNine letters, written in both Farsi and Erfglish, re-c~ived uring the past two months from as manyIranian friends
--
former students, colleagues(high school teachers), and close friends
--
livingin Shiraz and Khorasan portray post-Pahlavi Iranin a somewhat different light than American
Em-
bassy and American press reporting. Shiraz andcertain remote areas of Khorasan appear calm andpeaceful, generally free of violent incidents.Inhabitants of these two areas have welcomed thedemise of the Pahlavis and the establishment of anIslamic Republic, and yet criticize freely and fear-lessly their new leaders, including Khomeini. Al-though high school students throughout Iran, eventhose in the remotest towns, were greatly politi-cized, schools were running normally by Now Ruz.Although a sense of betrayal and hyprocrisy ofCarter's human rights policy led most to lividlycondemn the
USG,
affection and respect remained forindividual Americans. While the Correspondentsrecognized the great problems confronting post-Pahlavi Iran, few desire to flee. On the contrary,most of these nine correspondents, inspired by theundreamed of quick success of the Revolution intoppling the Shah, seek to participate actively inthe transformation of their society. In short, thesepredominantly young, lower-to-middle class "provincials"remain optimistic six months after the Shah's departure.The diversity In correspondents is great: in education, fromeleventh graders in high school to two masters degree holders;in age, from sixteen to about fifty-five; in experience, froman isolated villager who has only traveled to Mashhad onceor twice in his life to an urbane Shirazi who has traveledwidely in Europe (but not the US); in social class, fromtribal lower class to urban upper middle class.In only two respects can the correspondence of such a variedgroup be generalized.First, all now approve wholeheartedly
of
the
overthrow of the Shah. Several students participatedCONFIDENTIAL

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