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Foreign Born Report May2012

Foreign Born Report May2012

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American Community Survey Reports 
U.S. Department o Commerce
Economics and Statistics Administration
U.S. CENSUS BUREAU
The Foreign-Born Population in theUnited States: 2010
INTRODUCTION
This report presents a portrait o theoreign-born population in the UnitedStates. The U.S. Census Bureau uses theterm
oreign born
to reer to anyone whois not a U.S. citizen at birth. This includesnaturalized citizens, lawul permanentresidents, temporary migrants (such asoreign students), humanitarian migrants(such as reugees), and undocumentedmigrants. The term
native born
reers toanyone born in the United States, PuertoRico, or a U.S. Island Area, or those bornabroad o at least one U.S. citizen parent.
1
Inormation on the demographic, social,economic, and housing characteristicspresented in this report is based on datarom the 2010 American CommunitySurvey (ACS).
2
 In this report, data on the oreign bornare presented by broad region o birth,including Arica, Asia, Europe, LatinAmerica and the Caribbean, NorthernAmerica, and Oceania. More detail isshown or Latin America and theCaribbean—including Mexico, OtherCentral America, South America, and theCaribbean. For this report, the categoryOther Central America excludes Mexicobut includes the remaining countries o Central America.
3
In the graphs display-ing inormation by nativity and place
1
The terms
native
and
native born
are used inter-changeably in this report. U.S. Island Areas includeGuam, American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands, andthe Commonwealth o the Northern Mariana Islands.
2
Additional inormation about the ACS is avail-able on the Census Bureau’s Web site at
www.census.gov/acs/www/ 
.
3
Other Central America includes the countries o Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras,Nicaragua, and Panama.
o birth, data on the total, native, andoreign-born populations as well as theregions o birth are shown in light green,while the areas within Latin America areshown in light blue.
4
Data are shown or population (e.g., age,marital status, occupation) and house-hold (e.g., size, type, income) character-istics. A household is a person or a groupo people who occupy a housing unit astheir current residence. College residencehalls, military barracks, correctional acili-ties, and other group quarters are notincluded. A householder is usually theperson, or one o the people, in whosename the home is owned, being bought,or rented. A amily household consists o a householder and one or more peopleliving together in the same householdwho are related to the householder bybirth, marriage, or adoption. It may alsoinclude people unrelated to the house-holder. The nativity status and place o birth o a household are determined bythe nativity status and place o birth o the householder. A household with aoreign-born householder may alsocontain native residents, and a house-hold with a native householder may alsocontain oreign-born residents.The 2010 ACS estimated the number o oreign born in the United States to be
4
The term
Latin America and the Caribbean
 includes countries in Central and South America andthe Caribbean. Throughout the remainder o thisreport, the term
Latin America 
is used to reer toall o these areas. A complete list o the countriesincluded in the regions and subregions is available onthe Census Bureau’s Web site at
www.census.gov  /acs/www/Downloads/data_documentation /CodeLists/Foreign_Country_Code_List_062310.pd 
.
Issued May 2012
ACS-19
ByElizabeth M. Grieco,Yesenia D. Acosta,G. Patricia de la Cruz,Christine Gambino,Thomas Gryn,Luke J. Larsen,Edward N. Trevelyan,andNathan P. Walters 
 
2
U.S. Census Bureau
nearly 40 million, or 13 percent o the total population (Table 1).
5
The oreign-born population romLatin America was the largestregion-o-birth group, accountingor over hal (53 percent) o alloreign born (Table 2). By compari-son, 28 percent o the oreign bornwere born in Asia, 12 percent inEurope, 4 percent in Arica, 2 per-cent in Northern America, and lessthan 1 percent in Oceania.
6
Amongthe 21.2 million oreign born romLatin America, 11.7 million, or overhal (55 percent), were born inMexico. O the total oreign-bornpopulation, 29 percent were bornin Mexico.
5
This report discusses data about resi-dents o the United States, including the 50states and the District o Columbia; it doesnot include data about residents o PuertoRico. Population totals shown in this reportare as o July 1, 2010.
6
The majority o the oreign born romNorthern America were rom Canada(99 percent). About two-thirds o the oreignborn rom Oceania were rom Australia andNew Zealand (48 percent) and Fiji(18 percent).
Table 1.
Population by Nativity Status and Citizenship: 2010
(Numbers in thousands. Data based on sample. For inormation on condentialityprotection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and denitions, see
www.census.gov  /acs/www/ 
)
Nativity and citizenshipPopulation
1
Margin oerror
2
(±)PercentMargin oerror
2
(±)
Total 309,350(X)1000(X)
Native 269,394115871Foreign born 39,956115129Naturalized citizen 17,4768256Noncitizen 22,48012073
(X) Not applicable– Represents or rounds to zero
1
Population as o July 1, 2010
2
Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability A margin o error is a measureo an estimate’s variability The larger the margin o error in relation to the size o the estimates, the lessreliable the estimate When added to and subtracted rom the estimate, the margin o error orms the90 percent confdence intervalSource: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2010
Table 2.
Foreign-Born Population by Region o Birth: 2010 
(Numbers in thousands. Data based on sample. For inormation on condentialityprotection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and denitions, see
www.census.gov  /acs/www/ 
)
Region o birthPopulationMargin oerror
1
(±)PercentMargin oerror
1
(±)
Total
2
39,9561151000(X)
Arica 1,607334001Asia 11,2844728201Europe 4,8174412101Latin America and the Caribbean 21,2249053101Mexico 11,7118329302Other Central America 3,053467601South America 2,730426801Caribbean 3,731429301Northern America 8071620Oceania 2171005
(X) Not applicable– Represents or rounds to zero
1
Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability A margin o error is a measureo an estimate’s variability The larger the margin o error in relation to the size o the estimates, the lessreliable the estimate When added to and subtracted rom the estimate, the margin o error orms the90 percent confdence interval
2
Excludes 181 persons who reported they were born at seaNote: Percentages do not sum to 1000 due to roundingSource: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2010
 
U.S. Census Bureau
3
SUMMARY HIGHLIGHTS
Geographic Distribution
While the oreign born residedin every state in 2010, over hal lived in just our states: Caliornia,New York, Texas, and Florida. Overone-ourth o the total oreign-bornpopulation lived in Caliornia.Caliornia, New York, and New Jersey had the highest oreign-bornproportions in their total popula-tions. Over 1 in 4 residents o Caliornia and over 1 in 5 residentso New York and New Jersey wereoreign born.
Age, Marital Status, Fertility,and Household Size and Type
Hal o the oreign born werebetween the ages o 18 and 44,compared with about one-third o the native born. The oreign bornwere also more likely than nativesto be married and less likely tobe divorced. Foreign-born house-holds were, on average, larger thannative households and were morelikely to be amily households, toinclude children under 18, and tobe multigenerational. Foreign-bornwomen were more likely to havegiven birth in the last 12 monthsthan native women.
Year o Entry, NaturalizationRate, and English-SpeakingAbility
Over hal o the oreign born cameto live in the United States since1990, with about one-third enter-ing the country in 2000 or later.Overall, about 2 in 5 oreign bornwere naturalized citizens. For thoseoreign born who entered beore1980, about 4 o 5 were natural-ized citizens. About hal o all or-eign born either spoke only Englishat home or spoke a language otherthan English at home and spokeEnglish “very well.”
Educational Attainment,Labor Force Participation, andOccupation
Compared with the native-bornpopulation, the oreign born wereless likely to be high school gradu-ates. However, over 2 in 3 oreignborn were high school graduatesand more than 1 in 4 aged 25years and older attained at least abachelor’s degree. The oreign bornwere more likely than the nativeborn to be in the labor orce. Overone-ourth o the oreign bornworked in management, business,science, and art occupations withan additional one-ourth working inservice occupations.
Household Income, HealthInsurance Coverage, andPercent in Poverty
About two-thirds o the oreignborn had some orm o healthinsurance coverage and, o those,three-ourths were covered by aprivate insurer. The median incomeo oreign-born households wasless than that o native households,and the oreign born were morelikely than the native born to livein poverty.

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