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Biological and Health Effects of Exposure Jet Fuel

Biological and Health Effects of Exposure Jet Fuel

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Published by Rosario Marcianò

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Published by: Rosario Marcianò on May 14, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/05/2014

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Biological And Health Effects OfExposure To Kerosene-Based JetFuels And Performance Additives
Authors:
Glenn Ritchie
a
; Kenneth Still
b
; John Rossi III
b
; Marni Bekkedal
b
; Andrew Bobb
b
; Darryl Arfsten
b
 
Affiliations:
a
Geo-Centers, Inc., Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, USA.
b
Naval Health Research Center Detachment-Toxicology, Wright-Patterson AirForce Base, Ohio, USA.
DOI:
10.1080/10937400306473
Publication Frequency:
8 issues per year
Published in:
 
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B
, Volume
6
,Issue
4
July 2003 , pages 357 - 451
Subjects:
 
Environmental & Ecological Toxicology
;
Environmental Health
;
Environmental Studies & Management
;
Toxicology
;
Number of References:
429
Formats available:
PDF (English)
Also incorporating:
 
Comments on Toxicology
 
View Article:
 
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Abstract
Over 2 million military and civilian personnel per year (over 1 million in the United States)are occupationally exposed, respectively, to jet propulsion fuel-8 (JP-8), JP-8 +100 or JP-5, or to the civil aviation equivalents Jet A or Jet A-1. Approximately 60 billion gallons ofthese kerosene-based jet fuels are annually consumed worldwide (26 billion gallons in theUnited States), including over 5 billion gallons of JP-8 by the militaries of the UnitedStates and other NATO countries. JP-8, for example, represents the largest singlechemical exposure in the U.S. military (2.53 billion gallons in 2000), while Jet A and A-1are among the most common sources of nonmilitary occupational chemical exposure.Although more recent figures were not available, approximately 4.06 billion gallons ofkerosene per se were consumed in the United States in 1990 (IARC, 1992). Theseexposures may occur repeatedly to raw fuel, vapor phase, aerosol phase, or fuelcombustion exhaust by dermal absorption, pulmonary inhalation, or oral ingestion routes.Additionally, the public may be repeatedly exposed to lower levels of jet fuel vapor/aerosolor to fuel combustion products through atmospheric contamination, or to raw fuelconstituents by contact with contaminated groundwater or soil. Kerosene-basedhydrocarbon fuels are complex mixtures of up to 260+ aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarboncompounds (C 6 -C 17+ ; possibly 2000+ isomeric forms), including varyingconcentrations of potential toxicants such as benzene, n-hexane, toluene, xylenes,trimethylpentane, methoxyethanol, naphthalenes (including polycyclic aromatichydrocarbons [PAHs], and certain other C 9 -C 12 fractions (i.e., n-propylbenzene,trimethylbenzene isomers). While hydrocarbon fuel exposures occur typically at
Pagina 1 di 2Biological And Health Effects Of Exposure To Kerosene-Based Jet Fuels And Per...25/02/2010http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a713850771&db=all

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