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Liberty Newspost May-15-2012

Liberty Newspost May-15-2012

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Published by: Liberty Newspost Corp. on May 16, 2012
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Curated News Editionhttp://www.LibertyNewspost.com- 16/05/12
Submitted at 5/15/2012 5:34:55 PM
By Melissa Nann Burke, The(Wilmington, Del.) News JournalUpdatedIf you're reading this story onyour smartphone while walking,you're looking in the wrong place.The (Wilmington, Del.) NewsJournal A pedestrian looks at hercellphone at an intersection inNewark, Del.The (Wilmington, Del.) NewsJournalA pedestrian looks at hercellphone at an intersection inNewark, Del.A growing number of communities are trying to get thatmessage across to stave off pedestrian accidents that canhappen when people walkingbecome too engrossed with theirphones.This spring,Fort Lee, N.J., policebegan issuing $85 fines forcareless walking, and theUtahTransit Authoritymade distractedwalking around trains punishableby a $50 fine.Delaware has taken a differentapproach, placing about 100 largestickers with the words "LOOKUP" on sidewalks near crosswalksin Wilmington, Newark andRehoboth Beach, urgingpedestrians to pay less attention totheir phones and more to what'sgoing on around them."Delaware may be breaking somenew ground," says JonathanAdkins, spokesman for theGovernors Highway SafetyAssociation, which tracks statehighway safety campaigns. "It'sreally an emerging issue."By Wade Malcolm, The(Wilmington, Del.) News Journal"Look Up" stickers are placed onsidewalks at busy intersections onthe University of Delawarecampus in Newark to remindtexting pedestrians to pay closerattention to traffic.Nabree Tilghman, 18, slowed hiswalk slightly to check his Androidsmartphone as he approached anintersection this week inWilmington, Del."If you're aware of yoursurroundings, it's safe. You justhave to be smart about it." saidTilghman, a student at DelawareTechnical Community College.Tilghman admits he has, onoccasion, tripped while textingand crossing the street, but sayshe hasn't run into anyone or hadclose calls with a moving vehicle.Others haven't fared as well.Research fromOhio StateUniversityshowed cellphone useby pedestrians led to more than1,000 emergency-room visitsnationwide in 2008.In March, a 45-year-old womanhad to be rescued fromLakeMichiganafter she fell off a pierwhile texting and walking, policesaid."When people are talking oncellphones, texting or evenlistening to music, unfortunately,they're not as aware of what'sgoing on around them," saidPolice Lt. Mark Farrall inNewark, Del. For moreinformation aboutreprints &permissions, visit our FAQ's. Toreport corrections andclarifications, contact StandardsEditor Brent Jones. Forpublication consideration in thenewspaper, send comments toletters@usatoday.com. Includename, phone number, city andstate for verification. To view ourcorrections, go tocorrections.usatoday.com. USATODAY is now using Facebook Comments on our stories and blogposts to provide an enhanced userexperience. To post a comment,log into Facebook and then "Add"your comment. To report spam orabuse, click the "X" in the upperright corner of the comment box.To find out more, read theFAQandConversation Guidelines.This entry passed through theFull-Text RSSservice — if this isyour content and you're reading iton someone else's site, please readthe FAQ atfivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.FiveFiltersrecommends:Donate toWikileaks.[unable to retrieve full-textcontent][unable to retrieve full-textcontent][unable to retrieve full-textcontent]
 
2Curated News Edition
Submitted at 5/15/2012 4:25:43 PM
SANAA (AP) – Al-Qaeda'sleader has released a 17-minuteaudio address aimed at swayingpublic opinion against Yemen'snew president, calling him aU.S.agent and a traitor.AP Video image purports toshow al-Qaeda's leader, Ayman al-Zawahri, in a still image from aweb posting by al-Qaeda's mediaarm, as-Sahab, earlier this year.APVideo image purports to show al-Qaeda's leader, Ayman al-Zawahri, in a still image from aweb posting by al-Qaeda's mediaarm, as-Sahab, earlier this year.Ayman al-Zawahri attackedPresident Abed Rabbo MansourHadi for serving as vice presidentduring the "corrupt rule" of deposed leaderAli AbdullahSaleh.Hadi took over from Saleh earlierthis year in a U.S.-backed powertransfer deal that Washingtonhoped would allow Yemen toincrease operations against al-Qaeda, which seized control of much of the country's south."Out went a (U.S.) agent and incame an agent," al-Zawahri says.The audio was put onlineTuesday, the same day thatYemen's military announced thatU.S. troops were working directlywith them in a major offensiveagainst the militant network.Copyright 2012 The AssociatedPress. All rights reserved. Thismaterial may not be published,broadcast, rewritten orredistributed. For moreinformation aboutreprints &permissions, visit our FAQ's. Toreport corrections andclarifications, contact StandardsEditor Brent Jones. Forpublication consideration in thenewspaper, send comments toletters@usatoday.com. Includename, phone number, city andstate for verification. To view ourcorrections, go tocorrections.usatoday.com. USATODAY is now using Facebook Comments on our stories and blogposts to provide an enhanced userexperience. To post a comment,log into Facebook and then "Add"your comment. To report spam orabuse, click the "X" in the upperright corner of the comment box.To find out more, read theFAQandConversation Guidelines.This entry passed through theFull-Text RSSservice — if this isyour content and you're reading iton someone else's site, please readthe FAQ atfivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.FiveFiltersrecommends:Donate toWikileaks.
Submitted at 5/15/2012 4:07:00 PM
Three things are apparent fromPresident Obama's annualfinancial disclosure statement,released today:He is a wealthy man, with assetsof as much as $10 million.He has a hefty stake in JPMorgan Chase, the megabank that just made a bad $2 billion bet.Obama has an account worthbetween $500,000 and $1 million.Despite the nation's $15.6 trilliondebt, he is a believer ingovernment paper. More than half his assets are in Treasury bills andnotes.The disclosure statement listsassets and liabilities in dollarranges, so pinpointing thepresident's net worth is difficult.His assets appear to tally between$2.6 million and $9.9 million. Heholds a mortgage on his Chicagohome of $500,000 to $1 million.As was clear from Obama'sincome tax filing, much of hisincome continues to roll in frombook royalties. The disclosureform lists $100,000 to $1 millionin royalties from Dreams fromMy Father, $100,000 to $1million from Of Thee I Sing: ALetter to My Daughters, and$50,000 to $100,000 from TheAudacity of Hope.Vice President Biden, on theother hand, isn't all that wealthy.His financial disclosure statementincludes less than $1 million inassets -- and as much as $1.5million in liabilities, includingbetween $500,000 and $1 millionon his Wilmington home.This entry passed through theFull-Text RSSservice — if this isyour content and you're reading iton someone else's site, please readthe FAQ atfivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.FiveFiltersrecommends:Donate toWikileaks.
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3Curated News Edition
Submitted at 5/15/2012 6:13:34 PM
ByPatricia ZengerleWASHINGTON| Tue May 15,2012 7:11pm EDTMay 15 (Reuters) - For PresidentBarack Obama's re-election team,it's sort of like threading a needle.While trying to defineRepublican Mitt Romney as aninsensitive job-killer during histime as a private equity executive,the Obama campaign also israising money from private equityexecutives on Wall Street - andhoping voters don't see that ashypocritical.The Obama campaign's politicaldexterity was evident on Monday,as it released a blistering video adrecounting how Romney's BainCapital laid off 750 workers froma steel mill in Missouri. Hourslater, the campaign raked in about$2 million at a Manhattanfundraiser held by Tony James,president of the BlackstoneGroup, a huge private equity firm.The Blackstone Group had beenon the Obama campaign's radarbefore - as a target for criticism.Last month, the campaignidentified a Blackstone partner,Paul Schorr, as one of "eightwealthy individuals" who donatedto Romney's campaign after"betting against America" in "less-than-reputable" deals that led tooutsourcing and layoffs.So on Tuesday at the WhiteHouse, Obama spokesman JayCarney faced several questionsabout whether the president'scampaign was setting a doublestandard in dealing with WallStreet, where some executives seeObama as anti-business.Carney rejected the notion thatObama's team, in criticizingRomney and Republican donorsin private equity, had been criticalonly of executives who had notcontributed to Obama's campaignand that only those who supportthe president were "totallykosher," in the words of ABC'sJake Tapper.Carney said that Obama'scampaign was being critical of individuals, not an industry."There is absolutely a place for avibrant and successful financialsector ... that includes privateequity," Carney said.NOT 'AGAINST PRIVATEEQUITY'Carney's words were echoed byBill Burton, who heads PrioritiesUSA Action, a pro-Obama "SuperPAC" that is spending $4 millionto put out its own version of theanti-Romney ad released byObama's campaign."The president isn't runningagainst the private equityindustry, he is running againstMitt Romney," Burton said. "Ourads ask whether the decisions MittRomney made creating incrediblewealth for himself and hispartners would make him a goodpresident of the United States."Not surprisingly, conservativesdo not see it that way.The Wall Street Journalpublished an editorial on Tuesdaythat chided Obama for attackingRomney's private equity work andthen fundraising on Wall Streetthe same day.The newspaper, an influentialvoice in conservative politics, saidthat those at the fundraiser, "manyfrom the private equity world,paid $35,800 a head for theprivilege of dining with thepresident who purports to loatheWall Street when he isn't askingits greedy denizens to redistributetheir wealth to his campaign."FIRST IMPRESSIONSAnalysts said the attacks byObama's campaign - and thecounter-punching by Romney'steam, which released a video adshowing workers from anotherBain-owned steel plant praisingRomney - were not surprising.Although the election is morethan five months away, theanalysts said, this is a critical timein the campaign - especially forRomney.Voters who were not focused onthe Republican primaries maynow be getting their first longlook at Romney. So bothcampaigns are eager to create alasting first impression of theRepublican challenger to Obama."Some voters are just taking a firstlook at Romney, so the Obamacampaign wants to shape thenarrative," said Greg Valliere of Potomac Research group, whichtracks political developments forinvestors. "Negative ads work.Romney should know, since heeviscerated (Republican rivals)Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum with withering attack ads in the primaries."Valliere questions whetheraccusations that Obama is beinghypocritical toward the privateequity industry were unlikely togain much traction with voters,who he said already are deeplydistrustful of politics - andpoliticians."I think the irony is lost on thepublic," Valliere said. "Besides,he's a politician - what would youexpect?"Romney's campaign, whichwants to focus the conversationon Obama's handling of thesluggish economy, said thepresident is trying to distractvoters from his own record.In a speech in Iowa on Tuesday,Romney blasted Obama as anoverspending, "old-school liberal"whose economic policies aredamaging the country anddelaying critical decisions aboutgovernment spending and debt."What President Obama is doingis not bold," Romney said. "It'sold."There were new signs onTuesday of the challenge Obamacould face at a time when thenation's unemployment rate ishovering at just above 8 percentand the economy is growing, butgrowing slowly.A new USA Today/Gallup pollfound that 55 percent of Americans expect the economy toget better during the next fouryears if Romney wins theelection, while only 46 percentsaid it would improve if Obama isre-elected.And 27 percent expect theeconomy to get worse under aPresident Romney, compared with37 percent who expect thingswould become more sour if Obama wins a second term.(Additional reporting by KayHenderon in Iowa, GregoryRoumeliotis in New York andEric Johnson in Chicago; EditingbyDavid LindseyandPhilip Barbara)This entry passed through theFull-Text RSSservice — if this isyour content and you're reading iton someone else's site, please readthe FAQ atfivefilters.org/content-
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