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DAILY 05.16.12

DAILY 05.16.12

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Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 16, 2012.
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 16, 2012.

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05/18/2012

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SPORTS/5
COMEBACK KIDS
Four-run eighth inninggives Card win over USF
FEATURES/3
WATER INTHE WEST
Tomorrow 
Mostly Sunny 
6744
Today 
Sunny 
7449
By SARAH MOORE
STAFF WRITER
Thirty-three transfer studentsreceived offers of admission thisyear out of a pool of more than1,500 applicants, according to Assis-tant Director of Admission KateShreve. This year’s 2.2 percent ac-ceptance rate is nearly half of lastyear’s 4.1 percent rate, when 58 of about 1,400 applicants were admit-ted.“We reduced the transfer admittarget by 20 given the higher thanexpected freshman matric[ulation]rate,” wrote Richard Shaw, dean of undergraduate admission and fi-nancial aid, in an email to The Daily.According to Shaw, 17 of thetransfer students are from commu-nity colleges, while 11 are from four-year universities and five are inter-national.“We did see an increase in thenumber of applications for transferadmission this year,” Shreve said.“However, due to the diverse na-ture of the transfer applicant pooland its relatively small size, it is diffi-cult to characterize the pool as awhole and to describe how it differsfrom year to year.”Nonetheless, Shreve said shethinks transfer students differ fromstudents admitted during regularadmissions in some ways.“While we do seek many of thesame qualities in transfer studentsas in freshmen, [such as] a strong ac-ademic record and intellectual vi-tality, there are also some differ-ences,” Shreve said. “With transfers,we look for students who are aca-demically mature and prepared to jump into Stanford’s rigorous cur-riculum mid-stream. We also have astrong commitment to our U.S.Armed Services Veterans and tostudents with non-traditional edu-cational backgrounds.Shaw added that the transfersare “a different population with dif-ferent kinds of experiences and per-spectives. We believe the transferperspective does add to the am-biance of the campus and in theclassroom.”Transfers bring various uniquebackgrounds that diverge fromthose of the typical Stanford stu-dent who comes to campus directlyafter high school. For example,Emma Wood ’14 transferred lastyear from Williams College afteralso spending a year in Italy and Ar-gentina.This time was not only produc-tive for academic growth, she said,but was also a way to develop herpassion for food, wine and tangodancing.Even though not all transfer stu-dents belong to the same graduat-ing class, they still form their ownsense of community, Wood said.Transfers participate in theirown version of New Student Orien-tation, and this year, most transferstudents live in Kimball Hall orPaloma in Florence Moore Hall,making it easier for transfers to
Index 
Features/3 Opinions/4 Sports/5 Classifieds/6
Recycle Me
 An Independent Publication
 www.stanforddaily.com
 The Stanford Daily T
 WEDNESDAVolume 241
May 16, 2012Issue 61
UNIVERSITY
Bike crashhighlightshelmet use
 
By ERIN INMAN
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
Stanford’s Bicycle Program, inconjunction with the Departmentof Public Safety, is working to im-prove traffic control and conges-tion on campus by installing bike-specific stop signs and ridingguidelines on the roads. Two re-cent bicycle-related accidents,however, contribute to this exist-ing call for increased focus onbiker safety and responsibility,according to those involved.Stanford undergraduateAnna Polishchuk ’15 was hitbroadside by a car while bikingon Monday, May 7. Polishchukhit the windshield of the car,which was going about 10 milesper hour through an intersectionby Florence Moore (FloMo)Hall. She was thrown uncon-scious two car lengths away intothe bushes.“I was biking home from thedining hall, and then I find myself waking up on the ground,” Pol-ishchuk said.Despite the severity of hercrash, Polischuk escaped withminor injuries because she waswearing a helmet.Stanford undergraduates arenotorious for not wearing hel-mets, and this reputation has notgone unnoticed by Stanford hos-pital’s emergency department(ED), according to Robert Nor-ris, the ED doctor who treatedPolischuk.“I told her she could not be aStanford undergrad because shewas actually wearing a helmet,”Norris said.Polishchuk heard similar com-ments from more of the ED staff.“I was shocked by their shockat my wearing a helmet,” Pol-ishchuk said. “It was unsettlinghow amazed they were.”Norris commented on thevalue of wearing a helmet.“This $20 investment [the hel-met] saved her life. Period,” Nor-ris said. “Without the helmetthere’s no doubt in my mind thatshe would have been an organdonor or dead upon arrival.”The University has been try-ing to fight the stigma behindwearing helmets.According to Ariadne Scott,bicycle program coordinator, theBicycle Program — under theumbrella of Parking and Trans-portation Services (P&TS) continues to offer resources suchas a New Student Orientation
By NATASHA WEASER
DESK EDITOR
Graham Brown, director of the Center for De-velopment Studies at the University of Bath,warned against generalizing regional conflicts ascaused by one factor, such as religion or nationality,during a talk Tuesday morning.Brown said that individuals he called “identityentrepreneurs” often frame conflicts in terms of re-ligious and national identity so that they can mobi-lize support for their cause. According to Brown, thisis a problematic phenomenon because people face arange of “overlapping and intersecting identities toframe their struggle.“Looking at the dynamics of conflicts in Asia,when it comes to a choice between selecting a na-tional versus religious identity, there is a payoff ma-trix,” Brown said, referring to the main theme of hispresentation. His talk focused on local conflicts inSoutheast Asian regions, such as the Aceh region inIndonesia, the Sabah region in Malaysia and theMoro National Front in the Philippines.
Transfer class cut by nearly half tocompensate for high yield rate
UNIVERSITY
Freshmandies fromleukemia
SPEAKERS &EVENTS
Brown critiquesidentity framing
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ASSU seeks to fill Univ. committee spots
By JULIA ENTHOVEN
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
The ASSU Undergraduate Senate ad-dressed Tuesday a pressing need to form an in-terim commission to solicit applications, inter-view and nominate student representatives formore than 40 University committees before aJune 1 deadline.Senators described the process as “notideal,” “tough” and even “shitty” during theirsecond full-length meeting in office.Nanci Howe, director of Student Activitiesand Leadership (SAL), expressed concernabout the administration’s frustration with theASSU’s perceived incompetency if it cannotmeet the deadline for nominations.“The last three to five years, the ASSU hasbeen late every year,” Howe said. “Particularlythe Board of Trustees and the Faculty Senate[are] quite unhappy with the performance of the ASSU . . . I worry about the credibility of ASSU as an organization.Senate Chair Branden Crouch ’14 said thatthe 13th Senate told this year’s NominationCommission (NomCom) that the commission’sresponsibilities were going to be dissolved atthe end of this academic year. As a result, theSenate did not recruit new NomCom membersafter the commission’s term ended.The premature anticipation of the previousASSU Senate may have been due to an expec-tation that an updated ASSU Constitution, de-veloped by the Governing Documents Com-
Please see
 ASSU
, page 3
Realizing the DREAM
NICK SALAZAR/The Stanford Daily
Stanford students and community members attended a panel Tuesday evening titled, “Activism: What Can You Do?” The event was part of the2012 Undocumented Students Teach-In at which speakers and panelists talked about obstacles and opportunities for undocumented students.
NICK SALAZAR/The Stanford Daily
Graham Brown, the 2012 Lee Kong Chian NUS-Stanford Distinguished Fellow at Stanford, spokeTuesday afternoon on the “Global Dynamics ofCulturalized Conflict in Southeast Asia.”
By BRENDAN O’BYRNE
DEPUTY EDITOR
Akash Dube, a freshman fromDubai, died Friday, May 11, due tocomplications from acute lym-phoblastic leukemia (ALL). TheArroyo resident spent most of win-ter and spring quarter in StanfordHospital and the M.D. AndersonCancer Center in Houston, Texas.“He was a really strong, reallyenthusiastic, extremely resilientkid,” said Lena Potts ’12, Dube’s res-ident assistant in Arroyo. “He was ahuge member of this community,even though he was only here for afew months.Dozens of friends posted onDube’s Facebook page followingnews of his passing, expressing theirgratitude for being able to get toknow him.“I have always been so amazedby the way you care for other peopleand the way you take such genuineinterest in the lives and feelings of others,” wrote Austin Block ’15. “It’sso easy to see why we all love you.”“You were never here for onlyone quarter, Akash. You’ve beenhere ever since the fall, as a part of the Arroyo family, and will alwaysbe in our hearts,” said Janhavi Var-tak ’15.Even after his leukemia re-turned, Potts said Dube remainedupbeat.“He was still strong. He was thesame little Akash; he was still strongand hopeful,” she said. “He alwaysreally believed [in himself]. That wasone of the best things about him.”“When I saw Akash in the hospi-tal he was not only smiling and opti-mistic, but his primary concern wasto make sure that I was entertainedand not hungry,” said Adam Gold-berg ’15, a fellow Arroyo resident.“If you’re battling cancer, andyou’re preoccupied with the com-fort of your guests, it really justspeaks to how amazing of a person
Please see
DUBE
, page 2Please see
 ASIA 
, page 2Please see
BIKE
, page 2Please see
TRANSFER
, page 2
 Freshman life saved by bike helmet, ED chief says
 
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Wednesday, May 16, 2012
 The Stanford Daily
bond in the dorms.“There is definitely a transfercommunity, and it’s really wellmixed,” Wood said. “I think therecan be this fear that transfers willgroup off according to where theycame from, but there’s no segrega-tion along those lines.Wood said she doesn’t feel asmuch of a connection with the Classof 2014 even though she is technical-ly a sophomore, feeling closer tothose in her academic classes.“I feel like we’re in this interest-ing place where we’re betweenbeing a freshman in some senses,and being practically graduated inothers,” said Jesse Clayburgh ’13,who transferred from a communitycollege in San Francisco.Aside from this sense of separa-tion from one’s graduating class, thetransfer experience has its own chal-lenges. Ronaldo Esparza ’13 trans-ferred after two years at a communi-ty college in Miami.“You’re not sure what yearyou’re in,” Esparza said. “For exam-ple, I was in community college fortwo years, but that doesn’t mean I’mnecessarily a junior.”“It all depends on what classesthey accept,” he added. “That way,it’s good to have people from differ-ent grades that you can identifywith.”Stanford’s learning environmentwas also distinct from what Esparzawas accustomed to at his formerschool.At community college and othercolleges, you have to work by yourself and ace a test,” Esparza said. “Here,you have to work together to be suc-cessful. The challenging part is that it isnot only way more difficult [academ-ically] than my previous college, butyou also have to live and develop yoursocial skills.Wood also said that she had toadjust to Stanford’s active socialscene after coming from an institu-tion where academics seemed to bethe school’s only focus.The Office of UndergraduateAdmission hopes to continue tomake these transitions manageablefor incoming transfers through pre-established programs like New Stu-dent Orientation.“We remain deeply committed totransfer students and look forwardto welcoming a vibrant and diversetransfer class to the Farm in thefall,” Shreve said.
Contact Sarah Moore at smoore6@ stanford.edu.
TRANSFER
Continued from front page
Brown is the 2012 Lee KongChian National University of Sin-gapore (NUS)-Stanford Distin-guished Fellow at Stanford. Thefellowship is awarded to onescholar annually to conduct re-search at both Stanford and NUSfor up to six months.During his talk, Brown warnedagainst legitimizing or misinter-preting the goals of certain groupsof separatists, citing the Filipinogroup Abu Sayyaf, which he calls“pirates and war profiteers.He emphasized the need to dis-tinguish between greed and griev-ance as causes for conflicts.“Many times conflicts are notreally caused by religion, but thenit turns out to be in the process,” hesaid. “People invent causes andframe them into their identities.”As a researcher, Brown saidone of the fundamental problemsis how social scientists conducttheir research in the field.“Political scientists and schol-ars working on religion face theproblem of re-labeling religiousconflicts, which feeds into narra-tives that become accessible togroups [involved in the conflict],”he said.Citing ethnic conflict in SriLanka, Brown argued that schol-ars such as Samuel Huntington in-correctly labeled the Sri Lankanconflict as a religious one, and thusgave “identity entrepreneurs” theopportunity to manipulate theirliterature.Brown further argued the ideaof a “relationship between de-mand and supply and identity,”stating that not all of these identitynarratives stick.“Attempts to ‘Islam-ize’ theFree Aceh movement fall on deaf ears,” he said. “There is somethingabout the nature of Acehneseidentity that is strong and cohe-sive. People know what it means tobe Acehnese, and Islam is part of the project, but jihadization isn’t.”He contrasted this exampleagainst that of the Moro NationalFront in the Philippines, which hesaid is “a relatively new and delib-erately put-together bunch of eth-nic groups, and therefore there is a‘demand’ for more of a ‘jihadized’identity.”Donald Emmerson, director of the Southeast Asia Forum at theWalter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacif-ic Research Center, provided afew comments at the end of thetalk.Even though he agreed withmost of the points presented, Em-merson noted, “Identity is not aclinical choice and people canidentify with multiple identitiesand have a choice.“I am interested in Islam inSoutheast Asia and the idea of Eu-rarabia and whether or not there isa globalized connection of radical-ized Islam,” said audience mem-ber Jane Miller Chai ’60.“The talk was ambitious, but Ifelt that the idea of Eurarabia wasnot spelled out clearly,” she added.
Contact Natasha Weaser at nweas-er@stanford.edu.
BIKE
Continued from front page
(NSO) program on bicycle edu-cation for freshmen, free bikesafety classes offered twice amonth for the entire campuscommunity and a bike safetyweb page. Additionally, the pro-gram tries to increase helmetusage by collaborating withP&TS to offer discounted hel-mets.Despite these resources,much of the campus continues tobike without helmets, and whena collision does occur, accidentprotocol can get hazy.Last month, a fellow in theStanford Department of Pathol-ogy, Ellen Yeh, was crossing thestreet as a pedestrian betweenSerra Mall and the Main Quadwhen a bicyclist hit her.“I saw him coming really fast,stopped to let him pass,” Yehsaid. “He swerved into me fromthe front, and I fell onto my back.Both my arms hit the ground.”A witness had called 911, butYeh refused the ambulance, asshe “didn’t suspect bad injury.”Yeh reports that the bicyclistwas “unapologetic” and claimedthat he had the right of way.According to Scott, bikersshould yield to pedestrians onshared paths.Upon noticing swelling andpain in her arms, Yeh went to theER, where she was informed of three fractures in her arms, twoin the left arm and one in theright.“You can get really hurt bygetting hit by a bicyclist,” Yehsaid. “It’s not trivial — it’s dan-gerous.”Yeh said her injuries havecompromised her ability to per-form daily functions, as well ascaused her to postpone her med-ical research trip to Thailand.“There’s a hazy part to beinghit by a bicyclist rather than acar,” Yeh said, in reference to dif-ficulties in contacting the bikerwho hit her and the reluctance of police to get involved.“The police say there’s noreason for them to be involved,and I can’t force him [the biker]to talk to me,” Yeh said.“I just want him to realize hisspeed, safety and be somewhatcompassionate . . . which is hardto achieve with a bike accidentapparently,” she added.To reduce accidents in the fu-ture, bicyclists must “get in themindset that they are ‘driving,’”Scott said. “They should be pre-dictable and visible. Bicyclistsshould be 100 percent focused onriding their bike.”Finally, to reduce the traumaassociated with said accidents,Norris encouraged helmet usage.“I’ve seen too many youngadults cut off in the prime of lifefor not having a helmet,” Norrissaid.
Contact Erin Inman at einman@stanford.edu.s
TRANSFER
Continued from front page
NEWS BRIEFS
Caterpillar outbreak prompts night spray 
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
In response to an outbreak of oak moth and tussock moth cater-pillars, Buildings and GroundsMaintenance sprayed oak treesaround Crothers Hall, BrannerHall and Toyon Hall Tuesdayovernight.The diluted “Conserve” solutionused on the trees should help pro-tect them from the furry visitorsthat have already caused trees nearCrothers to lose a significantamount of leaves. The Universityimplemented this solution twoyears ago, but the caterpillar popu-lation has continued to spike duringspring.The spray will provide aid tomore than just oak trees, accordingto an email sent out to residents of the affected houses.“Pedestrians also typically donot enjoy having the caterpillarsdrop down on them as they walkby, so benefit from this treatmentprogram as well,” wrote Craig Har-bick, Crothers Hall front desk co-ordinator.The spraying is part of the Uni-versity’s integrated pest manage-ment system implemented thismonth, which aims to address thisseasonal phenomenon of the cater-pillar outbreak on campus whilecausing minimal damage to the en-vironment.The caterpillars are a devastatingnatural threat to the local oak trees,according to a pest control notice onthe Student Housing website. TheUniversity has created a map of which oak trees will be treated.
 — Ileana Najarro
Palo Alto approvesretail and affordablehousing structure
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
After rigorous debate, the PaloAlto City Council voted 7-2 onTuesday to approve the construc-tion of — and rezoning for — a new“gateway” building on the corner of Lytton Street and Alma Street ac-cording to an article in the San JoseMercury News.The three-story, 50-foot-tallbuilding would include officespaces, retail and a 70-foot-tall cor-ner tower. These approved plans area reduction of the initially plannedfive-story building, followingmonths of debate between PaloAlto’s planning commission andLytton Gateway LCC.The negotiations also require thenew building to make space for 14affordable housing units.While the council officially ap-proved moving forward with theproject’s construction, speakers atthe council meeting raised issuessurrounding a possible parkingstrain. Many argued that the build-ing’s location would only contributenegatively to the existing traffic con-gestion problem due to a reductionof parking space.In response to these claims, thecouncil also approved Vice MayorGreg Scharff’s proposal to allocatesome of the funds behind the build-ing’s affordable housing project tothe issue of parking and traffic con-gestions. The $2 million in questionwould potentially go toward a park-ing garage for city use, but detailsare yet to be confirmed.
 — Ileana Najarro
you are.”Diagnosed his senior year of high school, Dube organized theTerry Fox Charity Run in Chennai,India, in 2009. Dube went toschools in Chennai and urged stu-dents to run, in addition to sharinghis own experience with cancer.The race, which takes place in loca-tions all over the world, helps raisefunds for cancer research.The Arroyo lounge now hosts amemorial to Dube, and a white-board features written memoriesfrom Arroyo residents and friendsof Dube surrounding photos of thefreshman.
Contact Brendan O’Byrne at bobyrne@stanford.edu.
DUBE
Continued from front page
 
 The Stanford Daily
Wednesday, May 16, 2012
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EATURES
By JOSH HOYT
STAFF WRITER
M
any homesteaderscame to the Amer-ican West in the19th century withthe tragically mis-informed notion that “the rain fol-lows the plow,” a theory suggest-ing that human land occupationand agricultural production of anarea would beneficially alter theprecipitation and climate of thatsame region. Ironically, the home-steaders’ land, which is consid-ered to be the backbone of Amer-ican agriculture and produces 50percent of the nation’s fruits, veg-etables and nuts, is now known asthe “Arid Region.”“We face some really dire cir-cumstances when we look at thewater situation in the westernUnited States,” said AndrewFahlund, executive director of theStanford project Water in theWest.Water in the West, formed inJanuary 2010, is a joint programby the Woods Institute for the En-vironment and the Bill Lane Cen-ter for the American West. It aimsto engage in research and policyinitiatives from various academicdisciplines in order to deliver so-lutions for the key water chal-lenges in the western UnitedStates.In particular, the program fo-cuses on three aspects: groundwa-ter management, water recyclingand water system sustainability.Fahlund emphasized that he andhis partners are mobilizing all of the relevant expertise at Stanfordto create an interdisciplinary lookat the pertinent issues.“The quality of the engineeringdepartment here, coupled with theremarkable legal minds and theeconomists . . . then you bring inpeople from the history depart-ment and from journalism, and allof them have contributions to takeon a very complicated issue,”Fahlund said.Members of Water in the Westled a 2011 Sophomore Collegeclass on a two-week, 225-mile tripdown the Colorado River in theGrand Canyon in order to intro-duce undergraduates to the com-plexities of the water system in theregion.The Colorado River supplieswater and power to over 25 mil-lion people in seven states, as wellas to parts of Mexico. The water issupplied to a diverse range of peo-ple, from rural farmers to urban-ites in Los Angeles, and increasingdemand for this essential re-source, coupled with a decrease inwater volume, is causing majorconflicts. The river once ran all theway through Mexico and outthrough the Gulf of California butnow runs dry at many places. Ac-cording to a 2010 Smithsonian ar-ticle, the river is 130 feet lowerthan it was in 2000.Besides the effects of waterdiversion from dams and irriga-tion, Fahlund stressed that thedire situation of freshwaterecosystems in California can betraced to climate change. Snow-pack in California, a naturalwater storage system, is expectedto decrease by as much as 80 per-cent over the next 50 years, andgroundwater is being pumpedout of the ground faster than itcan be replenished.“Freshwater ecosystems acrossthe West are pretty stressed andthey are really at breaking point,and up until recently they werelargely ignored,” Fahlund said.“You don’t think about waterpolicy on a macroscopic level, andyou don’t think about things like[the fact] that L.A. only exists be-cause they have been swindlingwater,” said Andrea Acosta ’14,one of the 2011 Sophomore Col-lege participants.“Being aware of these bureau-cratic policy fights and being onthe river and seeing the peopleand places that policy actually af-fects made the ideas so much moremeaningful,” she added.While students of the Sopho-more College trip reflected thatthey had fun learning to raft andenjoyed being surrounded by thedramatic landscape, many cameaway with deep concerns aboutthefuture of the water in the area.“I am not really sure who wouldbe optimistic about this situation,”said Julia Barrero ’14, who alsoparticipated in the SophomoreCollege class. “Maybe I am opti-mistic just because we need to beoptimistic in the face of this crisis.Fahlund said he sees hope forimprovement by bridging thefields through communication andcooperation.“We held a meeting just a fewdays ago bringing in groundwatermanagers from around the state of California, as well as researchers,”Fahlund said. “I don’t think the re-searchers had historically given agreat deal of thought to what prac-tical questions groundwater man-agers have had, and groundwatermanagers had never bothered toask the question, ‘What could re-search actually do for me in mypractical challenges?’“Our job is like translating in asense,” he added.David Kennedy ’63, professorof history and faculty co-director of the Bill Lane Center, looks to thehistory of water in the West both asan explanation and guide to han-dling thecurrent water crisis.“It is just an incredible engi-neering accomplishment to put inplace the system we have, and itdidn’t just happen . . . it took gen-erations and it took focus and po-litical will and engineering inge-nuity,” Kennedy said. “So if priorgenerations had that much ambi-tion and ingenuity, then I don’t seewhy we in future generationsshouldn’t have something compa-rable to update the system.”However, he warned, “Wecan’t go on as we have been.”
Contact Josh Hoyt at jwghoyt @ stanford.edu.
The hermit of Jasper Ridge
S
triding around under the fruit trees of histerraced garden, Domenico Grosso, the“hermit” of Jasper Ridge, was a familiarfigure to the first few generations of Stan-ford students. He lived beside an aban-doned mine shaftin a house he had built himself,surrounded by a chicken coop and stables, an out-door picnic area for his many guests and an orna-mental stream with carefully tended plants.“It’s impossible to have a complete picture of lifeas it used to be in the Portola Valley neighborhoodwithout knowing about one of its most intriguingand colorful early inhabitants,” said Nancy Lund, thePortola Valley town historian. “His life is the stuff of local legend.”Grosso, who lived in the Stanford-owned JasperRidge Biological Preserve in Portola Valley, Calif.,was the area’s unofficial guide. Especially after theUniversity opened in 1891, Grosso enjoyed the com-pany of many visitors. Hiking through maze of foottrails he maintained throughout the hills was a pop-ular Sunday afternoon community pastime. Stan-ford students hiked the trails often, and even JaneStanford is reported to have dropped in on occasion.Hospitable to the extreme, Grosso would sight visi-tors from afar and raise some combination of hisAmerican, Italian, French and Chilean flags.He offered visitors homemade wine, a vinegarywhite for strangers and his best red for regulars. Alsorenowned as an excellent cook, he would invite peo-ple over to “come on and eat a rabbit leg” as he putit. His pickled miniature corn on the cob was a par-ticular favorite.But if complimented on his cooking, Grossowould brush it off by saying, “Julia did it.” Or wheninviting friends over, he might say, “Don’t bring theJulia.” If someone played music, he would muttersomething about Julia and ask that it stop. While noone knows who Julia was, it is believed she was anItalian sweetheart he left behind or who died short-ly before he left Italy.All this could only come from speculation, how-ever, since Grosso was miserly with details of hisprior life. In an interview in 1952, well after Grosso’s1915 death, his friend Frank Bracesco revealed thathe had served as a soldier under Giuseppe Garibal-di and had been a valet to the Duke of Genoa.Grosso was most likely born near Genoa, Italy, inthe 1830s. He came to America in 1869 and hintedthat he had spent time in Panama and mining inChile prior to reaching the continental UnitedStates. He first worked for Hippolyte Belloc’s bank-ing company and later for Nicholas Larco as a ranchforeman. During this period, he is reputed to havediscovered silver in what is now Jasper Ridge, but heclaimed to have hidden the find by covering it withbrush and burning it.In 1875, when Larco became bankrupt, Bellocgave Grosso the prospecting rights to the land. Heimmediately moved there and set up his elaborateestate next to the 185-foot abandoned mine shaft inwhich he hoped to find silver. When the Stanfordspurchased the property, they unsuccessfully tried toevict Grosso, but with his prospecting right, he couldstay as long as he made attempts at mining.For the rest of his life, Grosso would remain ob-sessed with the idea that someone was trying to takethe mine from him. He went to great lengths to con-vince people he had found large quantities of high-grade silver, although records indicate that he neverfound anything worth more than one dollar per ton.Accounts differ, however, and some insist that hemade a fortune.“He kept mysterious bags under his house, whichhe claimed contained ore of the same quality as thatin his display jars,” Lund said. “About once a year,he’d take the bags to Redwood City in a rentedbuggy, presumably to cash them in.”It seems unlikely that the content of the bagsproved lucrative, since in his later days, after Belloc’swidow stopped providing him a pension — the rea-sons behind her financial support of Grosso are am-biguous — he basically lived off the generosity of others, walking around with a sack in which he wouldaccept vegetables and other necessities.He could not work the mine on his own and wastoo suspicious of potential investors to ever open itup again. Instead, he dug over 20 surface pits in thehope of finding his elusive treasure.In the spring of 1915, Gross suffered a stroke. Hewas discovered in his bed by Ida Bracesco a few dayslater. He died on May 18 in the San Mateo CountyHospital, at 85 to 90 years of age.In 1923, the Stanford Mining Department re-opened the “Hermit Mine” to use as a practice mine.By this time, most traces of Grosso’s stay there haddisappeared, even his house. But his story capturedthe interest of many students involved in the project.Who was this gentlemanly recluse who spoke fivelanguages and kept up an impeccable appearance?Did the lonely and mysterious figure, with a bearddown to his chest, ever actually make a “find?” Whatkept him up at night, sweeping his maze of paths inthe moonlight?The last official mention of the mine came in1941, when the head of the mining department stat-ed that it had not been touched in years. Today, thickhedges of poison oak guard the location of the mine,taking on Domenico Grosso’s legacy of protecting itfrom opportunistic hands.
 In addition to an interview with Nancy Lund, this in- formation was gathered from sources including“The History of Jasper Ridge: From Searsville Pio-neers to Stanford Scientists” by Dorothy F. Regnery,Volume 27 of the Stanford Illustrated Review in theStanford University Library Special Collections and“The Hermit Mine” by Merle Marion Repass.
 — Amrita Rao
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mission, would pass. The proposednew Constitution revised theprocess for committee nomina-tions, establishing a Joint Nomina-tions Committee made up of ASSU elected representatives in-stead of delegating the responsibil-ity to the external body, NomCom.This new document, however,unexpectedly failed to pass in thelast few weeks of the 13th Senate’sterm, leaving the ASSU with anoutdated Constitution and no newNomCom.ASSU President Robbie Zim-broff ’12 initially proposed Tues-day to nominate himself as the uni-lateral chair of an interim nomina-tions committee. Senator GarimaSharma ’15 noted, however, thatthis suggestion violated the bylawsof the Association, which say that“no member of the [Nominations]Commission shall, during her/histerm, hold an elected office of theAssociation,” disqualifying Zim-broff from such a position.For the Senate to approve Zim-broff’s self-nomination, represen-tatives would have been requiredto suspend the Senate bylaws andrules of order, an action opposedby several senators.Most senators said that whilethey viewed the idea of suspendingthe bylaws and giving the power of nomination to Zimbroff as flawed,the alternative — of losing studentinfluence in committees acrosscampus — would be far worse.“If this isn’t done, there will bevery drastic consequences,” Parlia-mentarian Kimberly Bacon ’15said in response to a suggestionthat the Senate have an open appli-cation process for a NomComchair. “I don’t really see a feasiblealternative in the time crunchwe’re in.”The senators also discussedhow their decision would affect theimage of the ASSU. Sharma saidthat she believed nominating theASSU president as the chair of NomCom, against the bylaws of the ASSU, would reflect badly onthe Senate in terms of checkingbias.Howe encouraged the senatorsto worry less about the details of their decision and focus more onproducing nominations efficiently.“We have more than just theimage at stake,” Jack Weller ’15said, supporting action rather thanmeticulous attention to procedure.“This is our duty; this is our respon-sibility. So we have to get it done.”The senators compromised byagreeing to reinstate those mem-bers of last year’s NomCom, whoaccepted a re-invitation. AlthoughCrouch, who served on the 2011-2012 NomCom, could only con-firm that one of the previous mem-bers would return, the senatorsvoted unanimously in favor of therevised bill, with both Zimbroff and the co-chairs of the GraduateStudent Council (GSC) serving asex officio members. The Senate didnot have to suspend the rules of order to approve the bill.Former GSC Chair Addy Satijaurged the Senate to ensure the exofficio status of the GSC chairs,without which the NomComwould not have a graduate repre-sentative. He said that the onlygraduate member on last year’sNomCom has already refused toserve again.“If there is a proposal for Nom-inations Commission with no grad-uate students on it, I know thatpeople would rather defer it andhave completely no appointmentsrather than go ahead with a com-mission that is entirely undergrad-uate,” Satija said.Satija also reported that theSenate budget, which the 13th Un-dergraduate Senate passed in itslast meeting, was rejected by theGraduate Student Council (GSC)the following day, leaving the Sen-ate without an operating budget.Funds for a retreat including Zim-broff, Vice President WilliamWagstaff ’12 and the senators—which Zimbroff estimated wasaround $700 for hotel rooms, foodand gas — came from the formerSenate’s budget. The current Sen-ate will discuss the approval of a re-vised version of the budget in fu-ture meetings.The senators also nominatedand confirmed Senator ChristosHaveles ’15 as treasurer.
Contact Julia Enthoven at jjejje@ stanford.edu.
 ASSU
Continued from front page
I worry about thecredibility of theASSU as anorganization.
NANCI HOWE,
Director of Student Activities and Leadership (SAL)

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