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The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway

The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway

Ratings:

4.25

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Published by Simon and Schuster
THE ONLY COMPLETE COLLECTION BY THE NOBEL PRIZE-WINNING AUTHOR

In this definitive collection of Ernest Hemingway's short stories, readers will delight in the author's most beloved classics such as "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," "Hills Like White Elephants," and "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," and will discover seven new tales published for the first time in this collection. For Hemingway fans The Complete Short Stories is an invaluable treasury.
THE ONLY COMPLETE COLLECTION BY THE NOBEL PRIZE-WINNING AUTHOR

In this definitive collection of Ernest Hemingway's short stories, readers will delight in the author's most beloved classics such as "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," "Hills Like White Elephants," and "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," and will discover seven new tales published for the first time in this collection. For Hemingway fans The Complete Short Stories is an invaluable treasury.

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Publish date: Aug 3, 1998
Added to Scribd: May 17, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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07/31/2014

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Activity (106)

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beabatllori reviewed this
I went to a large bookshop today in order to get a bunch of books from my to-obtain shelf.

I returned with this.

*sigh*

I have a TBR problem.
pessoanongrata reviewed this
Rated 5/5
His best work. This is where his true legacy resides.
jaylehnertz reviewed this
Rated 5/5
In spite of its title, this collection published in 1987 does not include all of Hemingway’s short stories. With the possible exception of some of the Nick Adams stories—that were published in a separate volume in 1972—the stories not included are probably not among Hemingway’s best, however. For the most complete compendium of the short stories to date, there is a 1995 volume introduced by James Fenton and published in the United Kingdom by Random House.

This Finca Vigía edition is certainly more readily available in the United States and it does provide one place for all of Hemingway’s best known and valued short stories.
salmondaze reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This book is certainly a collection that outstrips The First Forty-Nine, but some of the "bonus stories" are fileted from other books instead of being short stories in their own true rights, making this collection a step away from "perfect" or "complete" as the title would indicate. I would get the Everyman Library Collected Stories instead of this for people who really want to dig into Hemingway's short story prowess.
dekesolomon reviewed this
Rated 5/5
In the whole body of literature about war, no story rings more true than Ernest Hemingway's A Natural History of the Dead. Readers will find that story in this volume along with The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber and dozens of other shorts, each of them vastly entertaining if somewhat less profound.Hemingway takes a beating in the Academy today, every day of the year. It's fashionable to denigrate his work as "racist," "sexist," "grotesquely macho," and many English professors -- anxious to garner high approval ratings from this, that, or the other set of politically correct but ardently bigoted children -- pile on. Hemingway endures regardless, a writer who produced a body of work so fine that it's proof against the worst the academy can throw at it. His critics are laughable, really: So dishonest are Papa's assailants that many of those who claim to dislike his works have never actually read them.Solomon sez -- Read Hemingway's short stories. Discover Hemingway for yourself. Then follow up with The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea. You will never be sorry.
bkohl_6 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
The Complete Short Stories consists of the First Forty-Nine (itself a compilation of stories from In Our Time, Men Without Women, Winner Take Nothing and The Snows of Kilimanjaro), 14 stories published after 1938, and 7 unpublished stories, some of which are actually drafts for a novel.I absolutely love Hemingway. I sometimes wish I didn't, as some of these stories are completely depressing, but there it is. I haven't read most of the novels, but the short stories are magnificent, and I'm going to stop there, give away my copies of The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and A Farewell to Arms, and let the stories stand on their own.
koconnell614 reviewed this
In Ernest Hemingway’s Hills like White Elephants, there are many notions to symbolic meanings behind the actual text. One instance is the idea of hills looking like a white elephant to portray the meaning that the girl in the story is pregnant. The hills are large, white, and round representing a woman’s stomach during pregnancy. However, this story isn’t about love rather one more of abortion. They are stuck in between two cities in the middle of nowhere. In one direction is Madrid while the other is Barcelona. Two choices of where they are heading, one of keeping the baby or another option is aborting it. There are a lot of symbols representing these two choices, at one point the girl “looks at the bead curtain, put her hand out and took hold of the two strings of beads”. Another symbolic message is near the end of the story when the man picks up the “two heavy bags (…)”. These small references bring to light the drama and tension this couple is facing. The “heavy bags” show a darker side to this decision instead of the rather light argument that is occurring. The tension can be felt through the tone of the story and how each character speaks to one another. One part in the story the couple goes back and forth between two ideas and yet the man’s response is continually “No, we can’t”. For such a short story, there is an extremely dark and heavy side that is only told through symbols, tone, and Hemingway’s text.
lampe102 reviewed this
In “Hills Like White Elephants”, Hemingway calls the characters “the girl” and “the American”. These names have significant meaning and quickly develop the characters. First, calling the pregnant girl merely “the girl” is very significant and encourages the theory that Hemingway is very chauvinistic. By calling her “girl” rather than “the woman” or “the lady” implies that the narrator believes that the girl is too young or stupid or uneducated to make the decision to have an abortion or not. This believe that she is uneducated or young, or both, is supported when the girl doesn’t know of what seems to be a fairly common drink, Anis del Toro. Also, she seems uneducated when she drinks a significant amount of alcohol while pregnant. This shows that she is either uneducated and doesn’t know about Infant Alcohol Syndrome or else she has already made her decision to have the abortion, but is childishly dragging the American into a dramatic discussion for no reason. The simple grammar rules of the two names also put the American as more important than the girl. Capitalization has always been a sign of importance in English grammar; in this short story, the narrator chooses a capitalized name for the American while “the girl” is lowercase. This shows that the narrator believes the American to be more important than the girl. Finally, although the narrator isn’t necessarily nice to the man as “the American” isn’t always considered to be a nice nickname when abroad, it at least implies that he is an adult. He is not called “the boy”, but treated instead as an adult citizen of a country while the girl is portrayed as an uneducated child. I wonder if the narrator and angry with the girl on behalf of the American because she got pregnant and ruined their trip in Spain and that is why he treats her so rudely.
mukai101 reviewed this
In “Hills like White Elephants,” Hemingway divulges little about the characters involved; however, the fact that he tells us so little is what makes this story interesting. He quickly sets up the story with the imagery of the white hills in Spain, which represent purity and fertility to give the reader a hint about the plot (through reading the whole story, we learn that they are discussing a possible abortion). We are then introduced to our characters – “the American” and “the girl,” who remain nameless throughout the whole story. Since Hemingway chooses to call one of the characters “the girl,” we can assume that she is fairly young. The girl’s uncertainty and naivety in the story also gives us a clue of her age. She seems like she does not know what she wants, and whatever the American wants to do is what she wants to do. However, it seems like the American is naïve as well because he believes the whole situation (abortion) is “perfectly simple” and once it is over they will be happy again. This short story is successful because Hemingway never hits the reader over the head with the plot. He engages the reader by letting them fill in the blanks for themselves.
danes102 reviewed this
Ernest Hemingway’s use of symbolism and subtle hints in the dialogue of his characters exemplify the hidden situation amongst the American and the girl in his short story “Hills Like White Elephants.” At a first glance I did not realize the story is actually about whether or not the girl is considering an abortion. Only after reading it again and thinking about the symbols it became apparent. The mountains resembling a “baby bump” on a pregnant mother is a main indicator that the girl is due. The American continually tells her that either way everything will be fine. This is an indication that he does not want to make the final decision and why he ultimately leaves it up to her. This uncertainty is displayed through the image of him standing at the train station with one train heading one way and the other heading the opposite direction. He is unsure of which direction to choose knowing that each way holds a different fate. The girl appears to have made her decision when she ventures out into the light. The American quickly asks her to come back into the shade before she makes a decision that is not good for them. This indicates that he wants her to think about her decision before she acts on impulse and makes the wrong one. Through the use of distinct symbols and dialogue Hemingway conceals the reality from his audience and almost invites them to look for the hidden meaning behind the actual text.

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