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The Refuge That You Need.

The Refuge That You Need.

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Published by glennpease
Thou hast been a Stronghold to the poor, a Stronghold to the needy in his distress, a Refuge from, the storm, a Shadow from the heat. — IsA. xxv. 4.
Thou hast been a Stronghold to the poor, a Stronghold to the needy in his distress, a Refuge from, the storm, a Shadow from the heat. — IsA. xxv. 4.

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Published by: glennpease on May 18, 2012
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05/18/2012

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THE REFUGE THAT YOU EED.BY ALEXADER MACLAREThou hast been a Stronghold to the poor, a Stronghold to the needy inhis distress, a Refuge from, the storm, a Shadow from the heat. — IsA. xxv. 4.writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews describes theRefuge as " the hope set before us." ow ! by"hope" there, he obviously means, not the emotion, but the Object uponwhich it is fixed. For it is something "set before" him — that is to say,external to him, and on which, when it is set before him, he can lay anappropriating hand, so that by the hope here is meant the thing hoped for.That, of course, is a very common usage, in v/hich we transfer the nameof a feeling to the thing that excites it. So here it is the thing thatChristians have laid hold of which is called "the hope set before us."That thing set before men as the object of hope is the great and faithfulpromise of God, confirmed by His oath long ago to the ancient patriarchs,the promise of Divine blessings and of a future inheritance. And, says thewriter, away down here, in the very latest ages, we have the very samesolid substance to grasp and cling to that Abraham of old had. For Godsaid to him, " Blessing, I will bless thee," and He says it to us ; and that isa "Refuge." God said to him, "Thou shalt have a land for an inherit-ance," and He says it to us ; and that is a Refuge. The presence of God,and the promise of a blessed inheritance, are the elements of the hope of which the writer is speaking. Then, in his rapid way, he crowds figureupon figure, and, not content with two, the asylum and the strong stay,he adds a third, and likens this hope to the anchor of the soul, givingsteadfastness and fixity to the man who clings, being in itself "sure" sothat it will not break, and "steadfast" so that it will not drag. He goeson to say that this object of hope enters "into that within the veil." Butnotice that in the very next verse he speaks of some one else that enteredwithin the veil — viz. , Jesus Christ. So, as in a dissolving view, you have,first, the figure of Hope, as the poets have painted her, calm and radiant andsmiling ; and then that form melts away, and there stands instead of theabstraction Hope, the Person Jesus Christ. Which, being translated intoplain words, is just this, the Refuge is Christ. Jesus Christ is our Hope — and Refuge, because He is our Priest. Ah, dear brother, all otherenemies and ills are tolerable, and a man may make shift to bear them allwithout God, though he will bear them very imperfectly ; but the deepestneed of all, the most threatening enemy of all, can only be dealt with andovercome by the Gospel which proclaims the Priest whose death is theabolition of Death, whose sacrifice is the removal of sin.How utterly different all the inevitable ills and sorrows of this mortal

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