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DAILY 05.22.12

DAILY 05.22.12

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Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 22, 2012.
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 22, 2012.

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By NATASHA WEASER
DESK EDITOR
With a new, 823,000-square-foot Stanford Hospital, which willbe partially funded by a recentlyannounced $1 billion fundraisingcampaign, Stanford Medicineaims to connect “science and hu-manity in a caring and dignifiedmanner,” according to School of Medicine Dean Philip Pizzo.President John Hennessy an-nounced the Campaign for Stan-ford Medicine two weeks ago aspart of an initiative to build thenew hospital and invest in medicalteachings and research.Stating that the “the new hos-pital is not just about technology,”Pizzo said that the specific needsfor the fundraising campaignrange from meeting state buildingcodes to pioneering patient care.“The reasons for building thehospital are multiple,” Pizzo said.“It begins with the need for it tofollow seismic regulations, butmore importantly, it is for the ben-efit of the community.”“Providing the most advancedhealth care possible to people —locally, nationally and globally —will be one of the great challengesof this century,” Hennessey said inhis campaign launch speech onMay 7. “The Campaign for Stan-ford Medicine draws upon ourparticular strengths the prox-imity of the University to its hos-pitals and clinics — to focus onthis issue and better serve thepublic. It will allow us to seek so-lutions to some of medicine’smost daunting problems, and itwill begin in our own communitywith the new Stanford Hospital.”Pizzo said that the $1 billioncampaign does not reflect thetotal cost of the hospital — whichcould amount to more than $2 or$3 billion — but just the goal of the present fundraising campaign.Half the amount the campaignhopes to acquire has already beenraised through both corporateand private donations. To date, theUniversity has received corporatedonations from Apple, Hewlett-Packard, eBay, Oracle, Intuit,Nvidia and Intel. In total, thesecompanies have pledged over$175 million under the StanfordHospital Corporate Partners Pro-gram.Additionally, three families the Tashia and John Morgridgefamily, the Anne Bass M.A. ’07and Robert Bass MBA ’74 family,and the Christopher Redlich ’72family have each contributed$50 million.Stanford Medicine intends forthe new hospital to become a pio-neer in the medical field by incor-porating state-of-the-art technol-ogy, such as integrated medical fa-cilities, advanced imaging,genome sequencing and more ef-fective emergency care.Pizzo highlighted the adapt-
Index 
Features/3 Opinions/4 Sports/5 Classifieds/6
Recycle Me
SPORTS/5
IN THE HUNT
Stanford places fourth,qualifies for NCAAs
FEATURES/3
FARM ON THE FARM
Tomorrow 
Mostly Sunny 
7050
Today 
Mostly Sunny 
7351
 An Independent Publication
 www.stanforddaily.com
 The Stanford Daily T
TUESDAY Volume 241
May 22, 2012Issue 65
 
NEWS BRIEFS
RESEARCH
Researchers use DNA as digital data storage
Gates Foundation CEO toserve on Board of Trustees
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
The Board of Trustees elected JeffreyRaikes ’80, CEO of the Bill & MelindaGates Foundation, to be its newest member,the University announced Friday. Raikeswill begin his five-year term on June 1.After receiving an undergraduate degreefrom Stanford in engineering-economic sys-tems, Raikes worked at Apple Computerand, later, Microsoft Corp. He became CEOof the Gates Foundation in 2008.Raikes has remained a part of the Stan-ford community both by serving on Uni-versity committees in particular, theSchool of Engineering’s Strategic Counciland the Major Gifts Regional Committeeof The Stanford Challenge — and by estab-lishing a scholarship fund with his wife forStanford students from rural and inner-cityschools.“Jeff is a dedicated Stanford alum whohas been involved in and supportive of many areas of the University,” said LeslieHume, chair of the Board of Trustees, to theStanford Report. “With a remarkable ca-reer in both the corporate and not-for-prof-
By MATT BETTONVILLE
DESK EDITOR
Stanford researchers have developed away to use DNA as rewritable digital datastorage. Keeping data in cells could havewidespread applications in future studies,according to the team, which was led bypost-doctoral researcher Jerome Bonnetand Drew Endy, an assistant professor of bioengineering.“It’s a tool to study processes whereyou need to track history of cells,” Bonnetsaid.“Most of the questions in biology arequestions about history,” said Ton Sub-soontorn, a graduate student who workedon the research team. “You ask, ‘Why doesthis cell become a cancer cell?’ and ‘Whydoes this cell stay a normal cell?’”Just as a computer chip stores data byflipping an electrical bit or magnetic fieldon or off, the DNA system flips the orien-tation of a section of DNA to indicate anon-or-off bit.The team’s research involved establish-ing precise control over two enzymes —integrase and excisionase — that work inopposition to manipulate proteins withinbacterial cells. The team built on previousresearch that showed how to irreversiblyflip a stretch of DNA about 500 base pairsin length.“We needed to reliably flip the se-quence back and forth, over and over, inorder to create a fully reusable binary dataregister,” Bonnet said. “So we neededsomething different.”The team had lots of early success flip-ping the sequence in either direction inde-pendently, but struggled to make both sys-tems work within the same cell to createre-writable data. Endy said that the chal-
$1 billion campaign for Stanford Hospital toset global example of top patient care
New hospital tomodel future care
STUDENT LIFE
Tubbs receivesdonation fromOprah Winfrey 
By MATT BETTONVILLE
DESK EDITOR
Michael Tubbs ’12, currently running toserve as a council member in his hometownof Stockton, Calif., after graduation, receiveda significant boost to his campaign when hebecame the third political candidate ever toreceive a donation from renowned talk showhost Oprah Winfrey.Twenty-one-year-old Tubbs, a Democ-rat, is campaigningto oust 52-year-oldRepublican incum-bent Dale Fritchenfor the District 6city council seat. In-cluding the dona-tion from Winfrey,Tubbs has raisedover $30,000 fromover 225 donors,who have rangedfrom five-dollar do-nations to Winfrey’s$10,000 donation,according to Tubbs.Fritchen’s mostrecent campaign fi-nancial disclosurestates he has raised$36,372, according to Stockton’s The Record.“It’s very encouraging to have someonelike Oprah understand the need to re-inventStockton, to go back and to bring Stanfordresources and knowledge back home and re-ally affect change,” Tubbs said. “I have a re-sponsibility to use the resources and oppor-tunities I’ve been given at Stanford backhome in a place that really needs it.”The other two campaigns to receive finan-cial support from Winfrey were both success-ful: Cory Booker’s 2006 campaign for mayorof Newark, N.J., and Barack Obama’s 2008campaign for U.S. President.Tubbs said he is running for the seat be-cause Stockton is currently facing majorproblems he wants to help address. Accord-ing to Tubbs, the city broke its record forhomicides last year and is on pace to breakthat record again this year.Forbes magazine ranked Stockton sev-enth on its 2011 list of the most dangerouscities in the United States, and the city hasbeen consistently near the top of those rank-ings for the last decade. The city has highrates of violent crime and low rates of educa-tion, in additional to significant financialwoes and widespread foreclosures.“All of these are issues, but I think they’re
Rendering by Rafael Vinoly Architects
The Campaign for Stanford Medicine, a $1 billion fundraising campaign to create a new Stanford Hospitaland School of Medicine, is underway. The campaign seeks to create a model of patient care for the future.
Please see
HOSPITAL
, page 2
Multifaith melodies
MEHMET INONU/The Stanford Daily
Stanford’s Raagapella a capella group performed in the Old Union courtyard Monday evening as part of the Multifaith Concert. Theconcert, a capstone event to the Interfaith and Community Service Campus Challenge, also featured Testimony, STAMP and others.
Please see
BRIEFS
, page 2Please see
TUBBS
, page 2
 Senior is third political candidate ever to receive fundsfrom Winfrey
Courtesy of Michael Tubbs
Michael Tubbs ‘12 is acandidate for city coun-cil in his hometown ofStockton, Calif. Winfreygave $10,000 to hiscampaign.
Please see
DNA 
, page 2
 
lenge took 750 trials over threeyears before the team succeeded.“We now have enzymes whichcan bind to the sequence, cut it,flip it and paste it in the new ori-entation,” Bonnet said.The enzyme system that Bon-net’s team produced was adaptedfrom the behavior of a virus, ac-cording to Subsoontorn. Certainviruses attack bacteria by splicingtheir own DNA into the genomeof the bacteria. The researchteam’s work used enzymes fromthose viruses for its manipula-tions.According to Subsoontorn,the DNA region being flipped is apromoter, meaning it signals forthe expression of another geneticregion. In one example, Subsoon-torn said the team placed a genethat makes the bacteria glow pinkand another that make the bacte-ria glow blue on either side of thepromoter. Flipping the promoterthen allowed the team to changethe bacteria’s color.Long-term applications for theidea are far more practical than just color change, the team said.For example, if the system is ex-panded to have more bits, a cellcould record data about its ownlife cycle, which would be crucialfor research on aging and cancer-ous cells.“[A cell] can detect arsenic,heavy metals and stuff like that,”Bonnet said. “So you can makebasically sensors with memory.Subsoontorn likened cells tocomputing systems. He said thatinputs such as light, sugars andother factors determine a cell’sbehavior in predictable ways.“You can think of a cell as aninformation processing unit,”Subsoontorn said. “You takesome input, and it does some kindof logical computation, and it spitsout some output.”He said that keeping datacould help bioengineers in partic-ular because they could use thedata to learn the behaviors of cellsin a system.The DNA system also repre-sents an advance because siliconcomputer chips are not yet smallenough to fit within cells to takedata. However, Bonnet said theDNA system still has advantagesin the long term.“This idea is not trying to com-pete with silicon memory,” Sub-soontorn said. “This is data stor-age that can operate inside a liv-ing cell.”He said that some cells growand divide so rapidly that siliconchips would not function, anyway.DNA, however, can grow andmultiply along with its cell.The team said it next hopes toexpand the capability of the datastorage to a multi-bit system, pro-gressing toward a scale where itcan store practical amounts of data for real use.
Contact Matt Bettonville at mbet-tonville@stanford.edu.
DNA 
Continued from front page
2
N
Tuesday, May 22, 2012
 The Stanford Daily
it worlds, he brings to the Board abroad global perspective and adeep knowledge of the educationsector that will serve the Universi-ty well. We are very fortunate towelcome Jeff to the Board.”The Board of Trustees consistsof 35 members, including businessleaders, such as the CEO of J.C.Penney and the president of theKeystone Group, as well as theUniversity President, who servesas an ex officio member. Theboard’s responsibilities rangefrom managing the endowmentand setting the budget to settingUniversity policies.
 — Kurt Chirbas
WebLogin phishingscam targetsStanford users
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
A “particularly disturbing”email phishing scam has recentlytargeted the Stanford communi-ty, according to Matt Riley, direc-tor of information technology inthe School of Humanities andScience Dean’s Office. The emailentices individuals to give awaypersonal information by direct-ing them to an Internet site thatappears to be the StanfordWebLogin page.Riley warned administrators inan email Monday to always “dou-ble-check that you are squarely ona Stanford URL (web address) be-fore typing in your information.”He also advised anyone who feelsthey might have entered their in-formation into this site to file aHelpSU ticket.Nic Dahlquist ’14, a residentialcomputer consultant (RCC) inCrothers, also sent an email Sun-day to warn his house’s residentsabout the scam.“Some of you may have re-ceived an email like the one below,with a link that directs to a fakeStanford WebLogin that will stealyour password,” Dahlquist wrote.“Do NOT enter your credentialsinto the phishing site.“As a reminder, it is good prac-tice to verify a site’s URL before en-tering any information,” he added.
 — Kurt Chirbas
Researchers demofirst invisiblephotodetector
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
A team of Stanford and Uni-versity of Pennsylvania engineerscarried out the first experimentaldemonstration of a plasmoniccloaking sensor, a device that ma-nipulates scattered light to renderitself invisible across much of thevisible light spectrum.The device, a photodetector, ismade up of semiconductors coveredby a thin layer of metal. The experi-ment used silicon nanowires coatedin gold, but researchers state thataluminum and copper could be sub-stituted for gold to the same effect.Adjusting the ratio of silicon tometal creates the cloaking effect.When light interacts with the metal-lic nanostructure, tiny electrical cur-rents produce scattered light wavesthat separate charges in both mate-rials. Carefully engineering themetal coat to create an equal but op-posite electric charge to the silicon’scharge allows the charges to canceleach other out, creating invisibility.The charges must align perfectlyfor cloaking to occur, which requiresmeticulous balancing of the amountof materials in the device. The cloak-ing effect, however, works regard-less of shape and placement of thesemiconductor and metal, as well asregardless of the angle of light.“These structures can find appli-cation in broadband, chip-scale nan-odevices that naturally interfacewith the outside world and as build-ing blocks for transmissive metama-terials,” the paper reads. For exam-ple, the device can be used in digitalcameras for sharper images.The researchers described thedevice as part of a “new class” of chip-scale devices that combine thegeometrical properties of a devicewith its materials selection toachieve both electric and opticalfunctions.The experiment’s results werepublished on May 20 in the journalNature Photonics. Materials sci-ence and engineering doctoralcandidate Pengyu Fan served aslead author, and Mark Brongers-ma, Keck Faculty Scholar in theSchool of Engineering was thesenior author. Linyou Cao Ph.D.’09 and materials science and engi-neering doctoral candidateFarzaneh Afshinmanesh con-tributed to the research.
 — Marwa Farag
BRIEFS
Continued from front page
awesome opportunities to roll upmy sleeves to get to work to bringgreat change,” Tubbs said.Tubbs met Winfrey at a lunch-eon when she visited campus lastmonth. Tubbs said Winfrey tookimmediate interest when some-one at the luncheon mentionedhis candidacy.“She was really excited,”Tubbs said. “She kept comingback to Stockton asking, ‘Do youthink you could win?’”“Finally she asked, ‘Where canI send my check?’” he added.Tubbs attributed Winfrey’s in-terest in his campaign to his pas-sion for addressing the challengesfacing the city.“I think she’s more inspired bythe fact that there wasn’t a lack of hope,” Tubbs said. “For all the stuff that’s happening [in Stockton], wecan change it; we have to change it;we will change it. I think that’s veryin line with her and her own per-sonal story . . . and I think that’sreally captivated her.”Tubbs and Fritchen will faceoff in Stockton’s June 5 primary.Regardless of the outcome of thatvote, the two will both advance tothe general election on Novem-ber 6.Tubbs will be the first chal-lenger to Fritchen’s seat since hetook office in 2008.
Contact Matt Bettonville at mbet-tonville@stanford.edu.
TUBBS
Continued from front page
able nature of the new hospital,which he said “will have the besttechnology, but will also enablethe introduction of new technolo-gy in the years and decades tocome.”He emphasized that while thenew hospital will be a leader inmedical technology, it will alsolead the way in patient care. Fea-tures to improve the quality of lifefor patients, such as healing gar-dens and private rooms for visit-ing families, will be incorporatedinto the facility, which will beginconstruction in 2013 and be com-pleted in 2018.“We want to be able to deliverthe absolute best care to that nextpatient who walks through ourdoor,” said Amir Dan Rubin,president and CEO of StanfordHospital and Clinics, to the SanJose Mercury News. “We need todeliver care that leverages inno-vation and technology, but that isalso patient- and family-orient-ed.”Even though the new hospitalwill directly benefit the local com-munity, Pizzo said it will also serveas a model for hospitals world-wide.“When something has impactat Stanford, it will travel in the na-tion and the world,” he said. “Ouradvancements will cross bound-aries.”Medical students, who spend asignificant portion of their timeworking at a hospital for the finaltwo years of their degree, will alsobe able to take advantage of thenew hospital’s resources.According to Luz Silverio, afourth-year medical student, fu-ture students will appreciate thework environment in the newhospital.“Medical students are essen-tially trapped in the basement for80 to 90 hours a week,” Silveriosaid. “It’s nice to rest your eyes ona beautiful painting or look out-side. I think the University hasdone a great job overall rejuve-nating the facilities for med stu-dents. I’m really jealous I won’t bearound when [the new hospital]opens.”
Contact Natasha Weaser at nweas-er@stanford.edu.
HOSPITAL
Continued from front page
Rendering by Rafael Vinoly Architects
The new Stanford Hospital will offer state-of-the-art imaging equipment. The facilities have been designed toaccommodate future techonological changes, while maintaining a comfortable, humanistic environment.
 
By NICOLE KOFMAN
T
he fountain, previouslymasked by constructionwork, where the Terman En-gineering Center stood,combined with 77-degreeweather in recent weeks, has given riseto an increase in fountain-hopping talkaround campus.“Have you seen that fountain? It’slike it was
made 
for fountain hopping!”students exclaim, referring to the pool-length fountain located across thestreet from Roble, with tall, slopinggrass hills clearly made with studentsunbathing needs in mind.My first experience was everythingthat fountain hopping is supposed tobe, or at least what I thought it was sup-posed to be based on the endless hoursof “Stanford stalking” I partook in dur-ing the last, lonely three weeks of sum-mer when all my friends had alreadybegun their college adventures. Likemany of my other freshman peers itch-ing to get to campus, I read every bit of literature ever published about Stan-ford before arriving in late September,which both whetted my appetite forschool and increased my fluency inStanford abbreviations.I was in a group of seven in a mini-van on the way back from HooverWilderness after a Stanford Pre-Orien-tation Trip (SPOT), and after six days of bonding over summer sausage, hikingand sleep deprivation, we had re-gressed to acting like 7-year-olds, stuff-ing muddy handkerchiefs in ourmouths and sticking sweaty socks ineach others’ faces.Our SPOT leader tried to get us allto “simmer down” and act our age, but,in the end, the only thing that could sa-tiate us was a much-needed nap. Luck-ily, the painful, five-hour car ride madeour arrival to Stanford even sweeterthan it would have been otherwise. Wewoke up to the staggering site of themillion or so palm trees leading straightinto the heart of campus, hushing us asour designations as Stanford studentshit us for the first time.Immediately following our arrival,we were able to fully initiate ourselveswith an inaugural fountain hop as asubstitute for showering after ourcamping trip. Our SPOT leader, veter-an fountain hopper Charlie Johnson’12, had the brilliant idea of going foun-tain hopping instead of just sitting inthe hot dust of the Eucalyptus Grovewhile waiting in line for the showers.Fully prepared in river sandals, westarted sprinting for the red fountain infront of Green Library. After stubbingour toes on the lights at the bottom of the fountain, we ran to our next desti-nation, the small fountain in front of Old Union, where we made a whirlpooland tried to scramble up onto its top,the rough surface cutting up our el-bows, and in my case, leaving a scar.Instead of moving onto the Claw,which was closed for renovations, wefinished our fountain-hopping coursein the small fountain outside the BingWing of Green Library, piling into ituntil it overflowed.By then we were exhausted fromsprinting, so we sat out on the grass inthe Quad to enjoy each other’s compa-ny for what would be one of our lasttimes as a SPOT group before NewStudent Orientation (NSO) began.I remember distinctly the goldenlight filtering through the palm frondsabove us and illuminating the campusas we dried off and relaxed under theafternoon sun. As we gazed throughthe glowing archway into the barrenexpanse of the Quad that last evening,it was as if we could see the next fouryears of our lives stretched before us,with our first fountain-hopping experi-ence serving as a mark of its beginning.Taking part in a Stanford traditionwith the small group of friends that Ihad grown so close to in just a few daysgave me a glimpse of what the next fewweeks, months and years had in storefor me.At one point or another, fountainhopping plays a part in most students’collections of “I’m the luckiest personin the world to be at Stanford” mo-ments. This year’s freshmen from allover campus list their first fountain-hopping experience as one that helpedshape their first year on campus.“It was one of the first things that wedid as a dorm, and it was a very forma-tive bonding experience,” said NoamRosenthal ’15. “We had a boom boxblasting, and when we got back to thedorm, we were all wet and we just had adance party in the hallway.”“I felt initiated into the Stanford ex-perience,” said Atticus Christensen ’15,of his freshman dorm’s NSO fountain-hopping excursion.While fountain hopping plays a keyrole in so many Stanford students’ ex-periences, there’s always the studentwho still has not gone fountain hop-ping, perhaps because he or she is notinterested in dealing with chlorine-in-fused hair or running around with wetclothes, supposedly looking foolish infront of tourists.Caitlin Byrnes ’15 said the reasonshe has yet to fountain hop is becauseshe “didn’t have the right sassy bathingsuit” for most of the year. Fortunatelyfor her and the fountain-hoppingtradition — she recently acquired one.As my freshman year finishes up, Ican look back at my first fountain-hop-ping experience — or down at the scaron my elbow and remember thequintessential Stanford tradition withfondness as the first time I felt I be-longed on campus.
Contact Nicole Kofman at nkofman@ stanford.edu.
 The Stanford Daily
Tuesday, May 22, 2012
N
3
F
EATURES
By MARY HARRISON
STAFF WRITER
I
n the heart of Silicon Valley, less thantwo miles from the Stanford NationalAccelerator Laboratory (SLAC) andstate-of-the-art computer science build-ings, is the Stanford Farm. With irises,roses and lettuce all spilling into one another,the farm is totally insulated from the fast-paced, high-stress world that surrounds it (itdoesn’t even have Wi-Fi), making it a campusrarity in more ways than one.“It’s kind of ironic that people call Stan-ford ‘The Farm’ and this is as much of a farmas we have,” said Amanda Martinez ’14, headvolunteer on the farm, the small, one-acreplot.The farm is made up of two distinct parts:the Community Farm and the EducationalFarm. The Community Farm is made up of small individual plots managed by professors,graduate students and other affiliates of theStanford community.The Community Farm was first char-tered in 1996 when Brian Halweil ’97 re-quested a small plot of land near the golf course and equestrian center to be dedicat-ed to giving students and community mem-bers a place to learn and practice agricul-tural methods. The Educational Farm is asmall strip of land at the edge of the farmarea — technically the Earth Systems Pro-gram’s plot on the Community Farm. Theplot hosts melons, tomatoes, peas, beans,leafy greens, cucumbers and squash, as wellas herbs and other plants.“It’s really important for students . . . tohave access to something like [the farm]where they can grow their own goods andmeet other students who are also interestedin food issues and where they can get dirty,Martinez said.Patrick Archie, a professor of earth sys-tems who also holds the title of farm educator,agreed that it is important for students to en-gage in hands-on learning on the farm.“The farm is a place where people can getexperiential education that I think is the fun-damental ingredient that ties everything to-gether,” Archie said.Archie currently teaches two classes, onein the winter called Food Matters, about rep-resentations of food and agriculture in film,and another called Practices and Principles of Sustainable Agriculture.In the latter, according to Archie, students“learn the basics of everything that you needto do to take a little patch of earth and growfood for yourself . . . they also have the confi-dence to be able to understand at a fundamen-tal level the ecological principles behind sus-tainable agriculture.”There are six classes using the farm’s facil-ities this quarter, including a couple of stu-dent-initiated courses. Martinez co-teachesone of these courses, Grow it, Cook it, Eat It,withJenny Rempel ’12, a Daily columnist.Martinez cites her own course as an excellentexample of the strong relationship betweenthe farm and Stanford Dining.“Stanford Dining is completely in supportof my class and the whole farm program outhere,” Martinez said.Cynthia Liu, administrative programmanager of Stanford Dining, said in an emailto The Daily that the Stanford Farm Project,a student group that supports farm initiatives,and the Stanford Educational Farm regularlywork with Matt Rothe, the Stanford Diningsustainable food program manager, to helpstudent groups interact more with StanfordDining. Rothe also manages a plot of land onthe Community Farm.“I would say [Stanford Dining] is at the cut-ting edge of food movements among universi-ties around the country,” Archie said. “They’vereally been thinking about meals that theyserve as an educational opportunity.”Although the farm does not currentlyhave enough land to supply Stanford Diningwith produce, Archie said they hope to beable to grow food that will be eaten in dininghalls when they move to a new two-acre plotof land in about a year.In addition to connections with student-initiated courses and Stanford Dining, thefarm also has connections to classes in sever-al disciplines. The devices on the farm thatlook like they’d be more at home in an engi-neering lab than on an organic farm are theproduct of classes such as Design and Con-struction for Sustainability in Extreme Envi-ronments, a class offered by the Civil Engi-neering Department that tests out productson the farm.Among the projects being tested on theEducational Farm are pumps for low-costirrigation for farmers in Myanmar, solarpanels that electrify fences for farmers inIndia and underground seed storage tech-niques that could protect seeds in the caseof a natural disaster.Martinez added that in the past therehave been groups making use of the farmfrom other engineering departments, theGraduate School of Business and the HassoPlattner Institute of Design (d.school).“No matter what they’re doing, whetherthey’re in graduate school or if they’re un-dergraduates, there’s just so many fields thatconnect to food and to farming that every-body can find something that intereststhem,” Archie said, commenting on the ex-pansion of student involvement on the farmbeyond the Earth Systems Program.Leaders of the farm have noticed an in-creased level of community interest. In thepast, the Community Farm has experiencedproblems with careless visitors tramplingtheir plants, leading certain communitymembers to be more wary of publicity. TheEducational Farm, on the other hand, wel-comes their increasing visibility.“There are more and more food relatedgroups popping up on campus, which is verypromising for the Stanford food movement,Martinez said.She added that the Educational Farm hada few large groups of at least 50 ProspectiveFreshmen (ProFros) come tour the spaceover Admit Weekend.“It was really great to have that much ex-posure with new students at the farm,” Mar-tinez said.
Contact Mary Harrison at maryhari@stanford.edu.
By CATHERINE ZAW
STAFF WRITER
W
ho knew that a desire to find an environ-mentally friendly alternative to the red plas-tic cup — a beer pong staple — on Stan-ford’s campus could spawn an entire storedevoted to selling sustainable products?The ASSU Green Store was founded to serve this exactpurpose, but since then, has expanded to sell a variety of sustainable goods, in addition to providing green educa-tion outreach. Through these efforts, this entirely student-run organization hopes to make it easier for Stanford stu-dents to live more environmentally sustainable lifestyles.In 2008, Susie Choi ’12 started the Green Store withthree other students, Elaine Albertson ’11 M.S.’12, JeffreySweet’12 M.S.’12 and Eric Knudson’12 M.S.’12, throughthe ASSU Green Cabinet. According to Choi, one of theteam’s first projects was finding a more sustainable alter-native to the ubiquitous red plastic Solo cup.“Our first challenge was finding a replacement forthose red plastic cups that everyone uses on the weekendsand at parties,” Choi said. “The problem is that StanfordRecycling does not have the ability to recycle the plastic[used to make] Solo cups. If people are going to be usingcups anyway, why don’t we introduce more sustainablecups that students can [recycle]?”The team introduced recyclable cups in December2008.The Green Store is currently run entirely online, andproducts sold include compostable plates and utensils,once-used paper, eco-friendly laundry detergent andSmart Strips — power strips that shut off power to an elec-tronic device when it is not in use to prevent electricityleakage.“For all compostable [items], we work with StanfordDining and were able to get a wholesale contract so we getall the products for cheaper,” said Allison Fink ’12, a cur-rent Green Store team member. “We stock up on theseproducts and sell them for as cheap as possible.”The Green Store makes no sales profits and receivesfunding from the student services division of the ASSU.This money is used to stock up on sustainable products andsubsidize costs for large orders.“Our prices are pretty competitive with [other] pricesout there, especially because you order online and we de-liver it right to you,” Choi said. “Obviously, buying non-sustainable red cups is cheaper, but when we compare withother sustainable options, our prices are great.”While the Green Store website provides an explanationof how their environmentally friendly products can beused most effectively, the team said students sometimesare not aware of the information. For instance, Choi statedthat very often, students don’t realize that the recyclable
NICK SALAZAR/The Stanford Daily
The Stanford Community and Educational Farms provide a one-acre plot of land on campus where students and community members can learn and practice agricultural methods.
Students get their hands dirty at Stanford Community and Educational Farms
T
HEFARMONTHE
F
 ARM
F
ROLICKING
IN
FOUNTAINS
G
REEN
S
TORE
:
S
HOPPINGSUSTAINABLY 
T
HEFARMONTHE
F
 ARM
It was one of the firstthings that we did as adorm, and it was a veryformative bondingexperience.
NOAM ROSENTHAL ‘15
Please see
GREEN
, page 6
M.J MA/The Stanford Daily

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